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US Anthem in Yiddish

 
 
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 05:51 am
This raises an interesting question. Is it possible to be a good American while being proud in ones heritage. I couldn't find a date for this... but I know that through history, groups have had to defend their ethnic identity against people who expect those who live here to fit into conformity.

I think this is a great way to declare that one can be both American and Jewish.

http://digital.library.mcgill.ca/fishstein/images/12_07%20Star%20Spangled%20Banner.jpg
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 3,851 • Replies: 17
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Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 06:18 am
Funny that you should mention that. There has been a whole brouhaha recently about the US national anthem being sung in Spanish. Personally, I think that it was written in English, and should be sung in English.

Quote:
Star-Spangled Banner in Spanish brings discord
By Holly Yeager
Published: April 28 2006 23:43 | Last updated: April 28 2006 23:56

In case there was any doubt, President George W. Bush made one thing perfectly clear on Friday: he thinks the US national anthem should be sung in English.


The presidential declaration may seem an odd one. But an intense debate on immigration - and the release on Friday of Nuestro Himno, a Spanish-language version of The Star-Spangled Banner - have prompted sudden discord over the song.

Organisers of the effort said they hoped the tune would become a rallying cry for immigrants across the country, who have planned a national boycott and marches on Monday.

But some advocates of immigrants' rights fear that the effort may instead lead to a backlash. Michelle Malkin, a conservative columnist, dubbed the song The Illegal Alien Anthem. And the president said he did not think the song would hold the same value if sung in Spanish.

"The national anthem ought to be sung in English," Mr Bush told reporters gathered in the Rose Garden to hear the president discuss the US economy.

"And I think people who want to be a citizen of this country ought to learn English, and they ought to learn to sing the national anthem in English."



http://news.ft.com/cms/s/f6e65bee-d6fc-11da-b64c-0000779e2340.html
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ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 06:33 am
Quote:

There has been a whole brouhaha recently about the US national anthem being sung in Spanish.


Oh.... really. What are the odds of that happening.

:wink:
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blueflame1
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 06:33 am
Oy vey can you see?
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Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 06:40 am
blueflame1 wrote:
Oy vey can you see?


Laughing
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 08:33 am
Let's sing it in Pig Latin.

Oh aysay ancay ooyay eesay?
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 11:30 am
Anyone want to demonstrate against flag burning? Let's go horsewhip some flag burners.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 11:59 am
I've heard, btw, that the composer of the National Anthem of the United States of America is a royalist Britton! That's really worse than flag burning.
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username
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 12:06 pm
If the headline to this topic is just meant as a comment, and doesn't reference some source that I can't figure out how to access, then it's just a tad late. The Star Spangled Banner" has already been translated into Yiddish years ago, one presumes for immigrants to sing, as a meaningful gesture of solidarity.

In 1919 the US Bureau of Education sponsored a translation into Spanish. And that was official government action. "Nuestro Himno" is nothing new.

During the Civil War there were several translations into German. There were a lot of immigrant troops in the Civil War when groups tended to enlist together. Germans and Irish were prominent among them.

Cajuns in Louisiana, who are American-born, translated it into French, and their families have been here since before the Revolution, and I don't see right-wing idiots demonstrating against them. Probably a good thing. The Cajuns would whup their asses.

Amd there is a verson in Tono O'Odham in Arizona, and they've been here for 10000 years, and I'd say they have the right to sing it in any language they want, considering their ancestors beat mine here by 9800 years.

The whole thing is just another stupid brouhaha cooked up by jingoistic zealots who are convinced they have the right to tell everybody else just how to live.
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Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 12:14 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
I've heard, btw, that the composer of the National Anthem of the United States of America is a royalist Britton! That's really worse than flag burning.


No, it's almost as bad as flag burning.
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username
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 12:29 pm
The guy who wrote the tune was English. It was originally a drinking song called "To Anacreon in Heaven". Francis Scott Key only wrote the words. Which means everytime the Air Force Band plays it, they're playing a pub song, albeit an ancient one. How appropriate for our ex-sot president.
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Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 12:50 pm
Francis Scott Key was not a royalist but he was aboard a British frigate as a commissioner to negotiate the release of some American prisoners at the time of bombardment of Fort McHenry. The song is written from the perspective of his view of the bombardment aboard the ship.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 01:00 pm
Francis Scott Key wrote the lyrics but didn't compose the music. :wink:

Quote:
The Star-Spangled Banner
national anthem of the United States. Francis Scott Key, a lawyer, wrote the lyrics after watching the British attack Fort McHenry, Maryland, in 1814, during the War of 1812. The melody was taken from "To Anacreon in Heaven," a drinking song of the Anacreontic Society (of London) that was written by the British composer John Stafford Smith.
source: Britannica.com

Quote:
John Stafford Smith was born in 1750 and christened in Gloucester Cathedral. After his education at the Cathedral School he was a choir boy at the Chapel Royal London. He also studied under Dr. Boyce. He gained a reputation as a fine organist and composer and gained membership of the select Anachreonic Society. Member have included J.S.Bach, Henry Purcell and James Boswell.

In 1780 he composed the music to the societies constitutional song. It was entitled " To Anachreon in Heaven ". It was inspired by a 6th century Greek poet and was about the pleasures of wine and love.

He played as organist at the Three Choirs Festival in 1790 at Gloucester. In 1836 he died at the age of 85.

His song became popular in England and America. During the war of 1812, the British fleet attacked Fort Mchenry which protected Baltimore. Frances Scott Key was aboard a British war ship trying to get the release of an American prisoner. He was held so that he could not pass on any warning about the attack. When the sun rose next morning he notice the Stars and Stripes was still flying. He then penned the following verse to the tune of John Stafford Smith.

Oh! say, can you see,by the dawns early light

What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last Gleamings

... ...
0 Replies
 
timberlandko
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 01:19 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
I've heard, btw, that the composer of the National Anthem of the United States of America is a royalist Britton! That's really worse than flag burning.


While the melody of the song derives from To Anacreon in Heaven, an old drinking song which was the anthem of an 18th Century British partying society, Francis Scott Key, composer of the lyrics of The Star Spangled Banner, eldest son of American Revolution hero John Ross Key, was anything but a Royalist.


One of the earliest available recordings (ca 1915) of The Star Spangled Banner, as sung by the daughter of then-President Woodrow Wilson (Note: Approx. 2.7MB .ogg-vorbis file, can be played as-is with Windows Media Player or WinAmp, other players may need plugins)
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 01:27 pm
This would be a great thread if the first page hadn't been stretched out of all proprtion by that wonderful Yiddish translation.

I know, I know. Bitch, bitch, bitch.
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username
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2006 02:16 pm
Ah, ha, I thought I was missing something--where's the first page with the Yiddish translation? The only translation I get on the first page is the "Oy, vey, can you see?" Or am I missing the joke (as usual).
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Apr, 2006 06:15 am
username wrote:
Ah, ha, I thought I was missing something--where's the first page with the Yiddish translation? The only translation I get on the first page is the "Oy, vey, can you see?" Or am I missing the joke (as usual).


Look here: http://www.able2know.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=2008878#2008878

PS Actually, I would think that translating the anthem would be Job One, in order to spread freedom around the world, a la Radio Free Europe and Radio Marti.

'Course it'll be really fun if someone gets it in their head to translate it into Farsi.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Apr, 2006 06:54 am
I thought they'd been playing a Spanish version for years at ball games.

Jose, can you see...{/i] etc.
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