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Christianity + Diet = Hallelujah Diet

 
 
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 08:55 am
Attention!: there are some serious warnings about the "Hallelujah Diet - God's Way to Ultimate Health"!


Quote:
Not Everyone Is a Believer in Faith-Based Diets

Medical Experts Warn of False Diet ProphetsFilling Personal Void With Jesus

Source



The Gen 1:29 Biblical Health movement is built on one single verse in the Bible, and sets itself at odds with the entire spectrum of Biblical teaching on diet. Although there is no moral harm in personal experimentation with the vegan diet, there is everything wrong with teaching the vegan diet as "God's Ideal Diet" that leads to "ultimate health." Source
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 2,384 • Replies: 15
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 09:01 am
Quote:
Saturday, April 23, 2005
Trendsurfing: Biblical diets (The Times)
By David Rowan

Diet not going too well? Maybe you're putting your faith in the wrong book. It's taken a few thousand years, but suddenly diets based on biblical teachings are hot. With names like the Hallelujah Diet and the Maker's Diet, these scripture-inspired regimes are attracting a growing following among evangelical Christians and anyone else looking for miraculous ways to shed the pounds. In the US, this has led to a pile of best-selling books, with such delicious titles as What Would Jesus Eat?, Slim for Him, and - wait for it - Moses Wasn't Fat. Although after 40 years wandering around the desert, you too would get into a size eight.

The goal is to take true believers on a path of nutritional righteousness. Some begin with Genesis 1:29, in which God brings the Israelites their menu: "Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the Earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat." In other words, stick to fruit, vegetables, nuts and seeds. Others take a more carnivorous interpretation, noting that later in the book the Lord suggests that "every moving thing that liveth shall be meat for you". Or, if the New Testament is more your scene, you might choose only food available in Jesus's time. Think goats' milk rather than double frappuccinos.

Sure enough, this emerging field has already produced its own gurus, offering not merely dietary advice, but also the nicely profitable supplements to accompany it. The Dr Atkins of biblical diets would probably be George Malkmus, a self-proclaimed "Reverend" whose Hallelujah Diet claims to be "biblically based, scientifically validated, personally evidenced".

Malkmus rejects all animal products apart from honey, advising that you stick to raw fruit and vegetables, which he claims healed his own colon cancer. Medical records testifying to this miracle cure have proved strangely elusive, but Malkmus carries on selling his supplements and seminars. After all, as he points out, raw foodists in the Bible could expect to live for 912 years - whereas after the flood, when they started cooking, that dropped to a mere 110. So who wouldn't want to munch a few raw sunflower seeds?

Equally controversial is another best-selling author, Jordan S Rubin, whose book, The Maker's Diet, requires a 40-day journey which includes regular fast days. Rubin takes his cue from Leviticus, warning against Malkmus's raw food, and instead urging meat and dairy. Honey is in (after all, the Promised Land was full of it along with the milk), and whereas wild salmon is fine, the farmed version is "contrary to the Maker's design". It goes without saying that Rubin underwent his own mystical experience, in his case finding the diet cured his Crohn's disease. Are you starting to see a pattern here?

It has not dented the vast profits of Rubin's business that US food regulators have condemned his supplements' unsubstantiated health claims, or that critics have questioned his non-accredited academic qualifications. Nor has Malkmus suffered from similar censure of "false statements" for the products he sells, or from nutritionists' claims that his Hallelujah Diet is unbalanced and can cause serious deficiencies. The faithful, after all, believe in a higher truth - even if they have to munch packs of Bible Granola to attain it.

(The Times Magazine, April 23 2005)


source via the author's own website
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 09:11 am
Quote:
Dr. Don Colbert, an evangelical Christian and Florida family doctor, read something that shocked him: Obseity, a 1998 Purdue University study concluded, was associated with strong religious participation. The firmer your faith, the study suggested, the flabbier your belly.


It really tickles me when people make spurious conclusions. I would suggest that there is another reason why people of strong religious beliefs are flabbier.

Strong religious participation is correlated with lower economic status and social class. Poor people tend to eat a less costly diet that contains cheaper, filling foods, usually high in carbohydrates. There is also less of an emphasis on fashion. Poor people usually do not have the means to go to a gym, play golf, tennis, and do all the other things that more affluent people do that tend to keep them in trimmer shape than their poorer neighbors.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 09:29 am
Phoenix32890 wrote:
Strong religious participation is correlated with lower economic status and social class. Poor people tend to eat a less costly diet that contains cheaper, filling foods, usually high in carbohydrates. There is also less of an emphasis on fashion. Poor people usually do not have the means to go to a gym, play golf, tennis, and do all the other things that more affluent people do that tend to keep them in trimmer shape than their poorer neighbors.


Hmm.

Although I don't think that I have strong religious participation, I know enough, who have and show such.
Wouldn't call them neither of belonging to lower economic status nor social class.

But non of them would follow such a diet, though.

I don't think (and don't do such) that going gym, playing golf, tennis etc has something to do eating healthy or keeping fit, either. (And if that is a measure for 'poor', so I belong to that class.)


I just think that all diets aim to get money from 'believers'.
Eating healthy and keeping fit can be done quite easy.
I don't think, it has (a lot) to do with money - at least not in "first world" countries.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 09:44 am
http://www.sirc.org/articles/poverty_and_obesity.shtml

Quote:
"Obesity is linked to social class, being more common among those in the routine or semi-routine occupational groups than the managerial and professional groups. The link is stronger among women. In 2001, 30 per cent of women in routine occupations were classified as obese compared with 16 per cent in higher managerial and professional occupations."


I am quoting a report out of Britain.

Years ago, there was an old saying, that the higher the husband's income, the smaller the wife's waistline. The strange thing though, was that in the 1950's, when this concept was popular, it did not hold true for the husbands. In fact, there was the caricature of the fat C.E.O. sipping his Scotch, and chomping on a cigar.

What changed it for the men in the US was the fitness craze. All of a sudden it became fashionable for wealthy men to appear fit and healthy.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Jan, 2006 10:12 am
Phoenix32890 wrote:
I am quoting a report out of Britain.


It should be noted that the SIRC's (Social Issues Research Centre) contributors include Cadbury, Schweppes, Kellogg's, Pimms, Pimm's, Masterfoods, the Sugar Bureau ... ...

"Corporations have learnt that they can influence public opinion and public policy more effectively by working through seemingly independent organisations," says Michael Jacobson, of the Washington-based Centre for Science in the Public Interest, which campaigns for greater transparency. David Rowan/The Times
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 01:29 am
An aside:

Quote:
One in three men on diet

By Anita Singh
Published: 23 January 2006

One in three men is on a diet, according to a survey by YouGov into the nation's dieting habits.

The poll of more than 2,100 adults revealed 39 per cent of men have dieted over the past 12 months, compared with 61 per cent of women. Asked why they were overweight, 36 per cent of respondents said getting older makes you fat, 14 per cent said it was in their genes and 15 per cent blamed medical reasons beyond their control.

One in 10 women said they had been tried up to five diets in the past year, while 11 per cent had lost count of their weight-loss regimes. Reasons for overeating included being unable to resist sweet treats and feeling stressed.

One in three men is on a diet, according to a survey by YouGov into the nation's dieting habits.

The poll of more than 2,100 adults revealed 39 per cent of men have dieted over the past 12 months, compared with 61 per cent of women. Asked why they were overweight, 36 per cent of respondents said getting older makes you fat, 14 per cent said it was in their genes and 15 per cent blamed medical reasons beyond their control.

One in 10 women said they had been tried up to five diets in the past year, while 11 per cent had lost count of their weight-loss regimes. Reasons for overeating included being unable to resist sweet treats and feeling stressed.
Source
0 Replies
 
Chumly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 03:46 am
Quote:
"Christians have learnt that they can influence public opinion and public policy more effectively by working through seemingly independent organizations," says Chumly, of the Washington-based Center for Chumming in the Public Interest, which campaigns for greater transparency.
Or put another way, Christians (not unlike my dog) have come a long way since hiding from the vacuum cleaner (non sequitur type humor).
0 Replies
 
flushd
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 08:10 pm
People will do anything rather than think for themselves. sigh.

Thinking about what Jesus would eat?! Laughing That's laughable.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 08:30 pm
So, now I know. Not only am I an a-theist, I am an a-dietist.

Okay, that's two, what's the third one?
0 Replies
 
Chumly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 08:47 pm
Holds breath.............................
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 08:51 pm
Osso - a-burning bush?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 08:57 pm
I'll have to narrow the possibilities down a bit..
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 08:59 pm
Phoenix32890 wrote:
It really tickles me when people make spurious conclusions. I would suggest that there is another reason why people of strong religious beliefs are flabbier.

Strong religious participation is correlated with lower economic status and social class. Poor people tend to eat a less costly diet that contains cheaper, filling foods, usually high in carbohydrates. There is also less of an emphasis on fashion. Poor people usually do not have the means to go to a gym, play golf, tennis, and do all the other things that more affluent people do that tend to keep them in trimmer shape than their poorer neighbors.

Makes sense to me...
0 Replies
 
flushd
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 09:06 pm
It makes sense, but it's still ridiculous.

I'm po' and I am none of those things. Hell, there have been athletes outta Bosnia who trained by running on war-torn streets.

These folks are just fat b-stards looking for another quick fix.

BTW: I know that had nothing to do with Phoenix's point. Laughing I felt the need to rant about flabby people and their million and one excuses.......
"Jesus did it! He told me to eat the carrot cake!"
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jan, 2006 09:16 pm
Huh? I have no room for someone under 40 being unsympathetic to chubs. Call me in fourteen years, girl. Most have a free ride, metabolism-wise, in younger years.
0 Replies
 
 

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