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Flash Mob and Political Climate

 
 
gollum
 
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 08:18 am
Recently in quite a number of American cities, retail stores have experienced flash mobs, comprising a group of people openly shoplifting and running out of the store.

The cities I have read about are under Democratic control. Are any Republican-controlled cities having the same problem?
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 08:22 am
I saw news clips of these events. In one of them I clearly saw Joe Biden carrying a Roku TV and Kamala waving a semi automatic as they made their way to a black limo.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 09:13 am
@gollum,
It's not a "flash mob", it is an organized theft ring and it happens everywhere. It's a trend and it makes the news. You can read more here. California is out front in talking about the issue, so that might skew your perception, but you can find stories from Texas and Ohio without much effort.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 09:45 am
@engineer,
In part these have resulted from many stores having a policy where their employees are not allowed to stop shop lifters. There is no fear of being stopped and unlikely police will do much when theft is reported.

For most there are no consequences for shoplifting and there is the attitude that these large stores can afford it so no one is hurt.
gollum
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 11:50 am
@Linkat,
Linkat-

Is it stores operating in certain States? Or is the State irrelevant?

Do some stores have a policy of allowing (or event requiring) their employees to stop shoplifters?

Looking at the issue from the perspective of the shoplifter, other than a belief in honesty (which is unlikely), why not shoplift?
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 12:04 pm
@gollum,
Most stores have policies forbidding their employees from stopping shop lifters. This article talks about some of the reasons for that. There's a lot more in the article but here is the section of store policies

Quote:
The ease of committing a crime like that is, in some part, traceable to decisions made by the retailers themselves, according to industry analysts.

Tony Sheppard, an executive at Canadian loss prevention software company ThinkLP, received his first exposure to the issue as a store detective at a Montgomery Ward store in the Boston area in the 1990s. “The first shoplifter I ever went to detain was a booster stealing a whole rack of coats,” Sheppard said. At the time, he carried handcuffs and detained the suspected thief himself. “Nowadays, unfortunately, because of safety concerns and liability issues, a lot of companies are very hands-off.”

Lawsuits from people injured by security guards in the process of apprehending shoplifters — in some cases, even from the alleged shoplifters themselves — have made aggressive in-store policing a losing proposition, Sheppard said.

In one recent case, a West Virginia woman won nearly $17 million in damages from Walmart after she was injured when a man being pursued for shoplifting stumbled into her, on the basis that Walmart escalated the situation. “Most companies realized from a financial standpoint it’s just not worth it. A couple big lawsuits take away anything you gain by making all those apprehensions,” he said.

Sometimes hiring staff to stop shoplifters in the first place doesn’t make financial sense, security consultant Chris McGoey said. “To hire and train a loss prevention department, especially a competent one, costs money,” McGoey said. Some retailers have found that the cost of the merchandise recovered by security staff was lower than the cost of employing them. “It’s almost cheaper to do nothing and just take the loss” on that basis, McGoey said, “but then you pile liability on top, it’s a no-brainer.”
gollum
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 01:56 pm
@engineer,
engineer-

Can the State Legislature in the State in which the store is located, enact a law limiting the liability of the store in such cases?
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 02:11 pm
@gollum,
They can, but the article points out the cost of maintaining a serious loss reduction team is pretty much the same as just taking the loss.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 03:00 pm
@gollum,
gollum wrote:

Linkat-

Is it stores operating in certain States? Or is the State irrelevant?

Do some stores have a policy of allowing (or event requiring) their employees to stop shoplifters?

Looking at the issue from the perspective of the shoplifter, other than a belief in honesty (which is unlikely), why not shoplift?


I think this is a combination of both for example if you work for one if the big box stores they tell you this ... Company policy my understanding from a friend that works there it is not worth the risk or lawsuit if an employee were to get hurt trying to stop a thief ...I am pretty sure I heard seen this on a news program as well.

And exactly what you are saying ....that is why this thief is getting out of hand.
gollum
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2022 04:06 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat-

I guess that if a State enacted a low limit on corporate liability for such events, its corporations would be sued less frequently and would pay smaller awards.
0 Replies
 
 

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