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Rep Tim Scott Selected To Replace Sen. Jim DeMint in SC

 
 
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 09:25 am
Mr. Scott, entirely by the way, will be the nation's only black senator.

He has been appointed by our second Indian-American governor, Nikki Haley (R), the first being Bobby Jindal (R) of Lousianna.

So now the all-white men's club, the GOP (with help from the Tea Party) will have, in 2013, the only African-American senator, the only two Indian-American governors (one a woman), the only two Mexican-American governors (one a woman), two of the three Latino-American senators, and all four of the women governors.

(We need to have more women in governor positions - maybe the Democrats can help out here)

Scott will make an excellent senator and represent his state and nation with distinction.
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 10:35 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Seems like a step in the right direction.

While Canada briefly had a female Prime Minister and we've had a handful of non-white/non-European male MP's over the years, we've got a long way to go toward political representation that reflects the population of the country.

The only area I think we "look" good in is in the appointed positions of Lieutenant- and Governor-Generals. The Queen's reps have reflected the Canadian reality more over the past few decades than our federal government.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 11:17 am
@ehBeth,
Finnzy doesnt count Black DEM Senators, oooh folks like Carol Mosely Brown and Barrack Obama (he went on latyer and left the Senate)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 11:19 am
@farmerman,
the numbers are still too low - on all sides - for 2012/2013
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 11:24 am
@ehBeth,
True Dat.
During Reconstruction the GOP had a few Senators who were black americans. The total Sneatorial makeup of black minority memberes should be about 14 . and theHouse should have about 75.
On a population proportionality basis.

Finnzy is just keeping some kind of score and is more or less boasting that "weve got a black guy in the Senate" nyah nyah nyah.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 11:42 am
@farmerman,
No, I don't count Obama and Brown as current senators.

Do you?

0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 11:44 am
@farmerman,
Wrong again.

Finnzy is merely pointing out that the hogwash about a GOP closed to minorities is just that.

Democrats are far more concerned with keeping scores on minorities.
Cycloptichorn
 
  3  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 11:53 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

Wrong again.

Finnzy is merely pointing out that the hogwash about a GOP closed to minorities is just that.

Democrats are far more concerned with keeping scores on minorities.


If that's so, why did you bother to post this thread counting the number of minorities?

Cycloptichorn
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 12:08 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:
why did you bother to post this thread counting the number of minorities?


why not?

It's all over the news today and Democrats should consider why Republicans have this piece of news to trumpet.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/wp/2012/12/18/tim-scotts-importance-as-gop-senator-and-symbol/

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2012/12/tim-scott-3-takeaways-from-the-announcement-of-south-carolinas-newest-senator/266363/

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2012/12/18/tim_scotts_rise_--_and_south_carolinas_long_journey_116456.html

Quote:
In 2009 and 2010, as the Tea Party rose to prominence, critics in the Democratic Party and liberal corners of the media routinely smeared the movement as racist.

There was little evidence to support this claim, and plenty to rebut it. In fact, the tangible results of Tea Party involvement in Republican Party politics was increased representation in elective office of racial minorities. Prior to the 2010 midterm elections, only three Republican governors or members of Congress were people of color. Today, this number is 15, almost all of whom, including Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida and Ted Cruz of Texas, were elected with Tea Party support while bucking the (mostly white) GOP establishment.



15 is a respectable step
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 12:15 pm
@ehBeth,
Well, part of the reason the Dems are lower on this number now is thanks to GOP victories at the gubernatorial level removing a variety of incumbents and candidates who were female or minorities.

Cycloptichorn
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 04:19 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
I've already answered that.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 04:23 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

I've already answered that.


I don't think you did. I think you attempted to deflect it.

Cycloptichorn
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 04:27 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Good for you.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 04:32 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
That sounds a bit feeble.

Both parties are going to have to do better.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 04:37 pm
@ehBeth,
It sounds feeble because it is.

Both parties do need to do better, but it's interesting to see the one so often castigated for racism and exclusion leading the way, isn't it.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 04:40 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
I can't actually say that I think either main U.S. party is leading the way. One or the other seems to occasionally stumble in the right direction.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 04:49 pm
@ehBeth,
Think about it though, Haley and Jindal are not just representatives of a minority that have made their way to a position of high responsibility, they did so in states that, ant least according to Liberals, are hotbeds of ignorant racism.

They couldn't have reached their lofty perches without the support of local conservatives.

Likewise Cruz in Texas. Not sure what percentage of the Hispanic Texan vote he got, but he wouldn't have won without a whole lot of conservative Anglo votes.

Clearly, the race and nationality of these folks didn't win their elections for them, their positions did.

Republicans are moving towards a place we all want without the baggage of focusing on race and gender, but doing just what we all claim we want...judging people by their ideas, not their superficial characteristics.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 04:59 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
My view of it is similar to the snippet I posted from RCP - the tea party brought in most of that group - the clout of the old white boys in the GOP is fading away.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 05:15 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

My view of it is similar to the snippet I posted from RCP - the tea party brought in most of that group - the clout of the old white boys in the GOP is fading away.



Good riddance and good on the Tea Party.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Dec, 2012 05:28 pm
@ehBeth,
I've no real allegiance to the GOP. I count myself as a Republican because I want to vote in Republican primaries. I vote Republican because they are running against Democrats.

Should the GOP ever be successful in purging itself of Tea Party conservative influence, I will dedicate my political activism to the Quixotic goal of a 3rd Party.

Not to worry though, they won't for longer than it takes for them to vote them out of office.
 

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