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A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors

 
 
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2020 11:01 am
Can you see what this Trump's tweet mean?

Does "A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors" mean "White House Doctors gave me the official order (of discharging from hospital)?

The next sentence is even more confusing. " That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it." What does "it" mean here? Trump notes it as "immune, but the word immune is an adjective. He probably means immunity, which is the pretection of his immune system against the novel coronavirus. But if so, he can get it as well as give it (receive or donate convalescent plasma)

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Donald J. Trump tweeted 1h ago
A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday. That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!
 
View best answer, chosen by oristarA
InfraBlue
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2020 01:15 pm
@oristarA,
Yes.

"It" refers COVID-19. By putting "immune" in parenthesis the phrase "that means I can't get it," is being interpreted as meaning, "I am immune to COVID-19."
oristarA
 
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Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2020 11:19 pm
@InfraBlue,
Does "sign off" mean "offficial order of discharge"?
chai2
 
  5  
Reply Tue 13 Oct, 2020 02:27 pm
@oristarA,
You have to remember orister, that Donald Trump speaks his own native English at the level of an 8 year old.

In everyday language, "signing off" is informal. It means basically, gave approval for, moved it along, etc.

by the way, he isn't in fact "immune" from anything. He can get it again. Further indication you're dealing with someone who has little knowledge in general, let alone of English.
Firsois
 
  -4  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2020 03:11 pm
@chai2,
Problem with you uneducated people is that you literally do not understand any science except what is spoon fed to you by the media. Yes Trump is immune, for a few weeks, because he has developed antibodies to fight the virus. This is the very same protection that a vaccine provides.

The problem is only that the antibodies for SARS-CoV-2 are typically short lasting (only a lasting a few weeks to a few months) for those with a fast recovery, not that they do not provide protection against reinfection.

It really should be noted that "immunity" isn't the Hollywood standard where a magical force-field prevents the virus from entering your body. I find it hilarious how people don't recognize that a vaccine does not prevent a virus from entering your body, it merely gives you the tools to fight it off. The same goes for SARS-CoV-2... the whole idea is that you remain asymptomatic while infected regardless of how you acquire the immunity.
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