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Any suggestions for what I can do to take the chill out of my house?

 
 
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2020 12:11 am
Hi. As of the time of the posting of this thread, it's February 2020 and it's wintertime. It gets disgustingly cold in the wintertime where I live. I have an expensive electric heater which I didn't want to use because it causes my family's heating bill to go up. I checked to make sure no windows were open in my home. I had to tape one of them shut because it kept sliding down. It was 40-something before and now it's 50-something in my home according to my thermostat. I turned the heater on for a little while and that didn't do too much. I tried turning the temperature on my thermostat up but it kept dropping down.

I have not been able to sleep well because of how cold it is in my bedroom.

Any suggestions for what I can do to take the chill out of my house?

I don't know what else to do. Please help. Thank you.
 
jespah
 
  3  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2020 05:55 am
@JGoldman10,
Thermal curtains. Weatherstripping. Take up baking or roasting and run the oven.
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2020 12:46 pm
A thick goose-down blanket/comforter will keep you warm and toasty at night.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2020 03:15 pm
Of you are renting, there may be an agency to report this to.

Other things which can help, include rolling up a thick towel and pushing it up against the bottom of the door. You can also do this at the bottom of windows.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2020 05:59 pm
@jespah,
jespah wrote:

Thermal curtains. Weatherstripping. Take up baking or roasting and run the oven.


Hello Jespah, how are you? What is weatherstripping?

As I said I checked to make sure all the windows in my house are closed.

The only other thing I can think of to do is to boil pots of water on my kitchen stove. That's what my mother did to keep warm when she was around.

The inside of our oven does not work.

The man who comes to my home to pick up the rent each month also does handiwork around our house for free. I think there might be something wrong with our thermostat. I'll ask him to come over to look at it; he needs to do some work around my family's house anyway.
cherrie
 
  3  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2020 06:37 pm
@JGoldman10,
Boiling pots of water will only make the place steamy and damp and even colder.

0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 13 Feb, 2020 08:03 am
@JGoldman10,
JGoldman10 wrote:

jespah wrote:

Thermal curtains. Weatherstripping. Take up baking or roasting and run the oven.


Hello Jespah, how are you? What is weatherstripping?

It's something that takes a bit of DIY knowhow. It involves filling in areas around the edges of your windows where drafts may be a problem.

It might be best to follow this link to see the types of material and techniques to use said material to get the job done that best suits your residential needs.
Weatherstripping
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Feb, 2020 08:45 am
@JGoldman10,
Oh, I'm fine. Thank you for asking. As tsarstepan said it's a little bit of Mr. fix-it know-how but it can be done. Just because your windows are closed doesn't mean there aren't air leaks (that's a lot of negatives, but I'm sure you know what I mean).

If your thermostat is broken, then that's definitely one reason things aren't warming up. Your handyman may be able to swap it out for a smart thermostat (those can be programmed, so you can get it to turn down at night or when you're not at home).

If your oven isn't working, there can be tons of reasons (also depends if you've got gas or electric). Sometimes it's a matter (for an electric oven) of replacing coils. But your guy should at least take a look.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Feb, 2020 10:32 am
@JGoldman10,
Hot water bottles can help especially the old pottery ones if you can get hold of one.
0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Feb, 2020 02:37 pm
What the laws of thermodynamics tell us is that heat moves from areas of higher temperature to areas of lower temperature, so you may wanna try moving some cattle into the basement over winter to make a compost pile.

To achieve high enough composting temperatures to kill parasites, bacteria, and weed seeds, a pile must be at least three feet high. Otherwise, the heat generated in the initial stages will quickly dissipate before the pile can reach high enough temperatures. For best heating, try for a pile five to seven feet square on the bottom rising to three or four feet high.

After a pile is formed, keeping air in the pile is critical to prevent odors, achieve high temperatures, and to complete the composting process in a relatively short amount of time. If you have a tractor, turning the pile at regular intervals, especially during the first few weeks after building the pile, will speed up the decomposition process considerably. In general, the more often you are able to turn the pile, the faster it will decompose. Turning will not only help allow air to reach all areas of the pile, it will also ensure that material on the outside of the pile is turned to the center where it can be subject to high temperatures where pathogens, fly larvae, and weed seeds are destroyed.

If you are not able to turn the pile with a tractor, you can insert a couple of five-foot PVC pipes into the center of the pile like chimneys. Use a drill to put some holes into the pipes-approximately a half inch in diameter at six-inch intervals.

Temperature is an important indicator of how well the manure pile is composting. You can buy a long-stemmed compost thermometer at local nurseries or home and garden stores to monitor your compost piles. Most compost piles begin at a lower temperature range (about 50°F-110°F) then increase to the higher temperature range (110°F-160°F) and then gradually drop to ambient air temperatures over a period of several weeks. These high temperatures are necessary to speed up the rate of decomposition and to kill weed seeds and diseases. At least several days of temperatures between 135°F and 150°F are recommended.

You also want to avoid overheating the pile, overheating can immobilize many of the beneficial organisms needed for decomposition. If you find your pile is reaching temperatures above 160°F, you may want to try reducing the size of your pile. Low outside temperatures during the winter months slow the decomposition process while warmer temperatures speed it up. On average, a well-managed pile can be composted in one or two months in the summer and three to six months in the winter.

For peace of mind you can easily use the squeeze test...
Take a handful of material from the interior of the pile (not just the outer shell) and give it a squeeze. A handful of material should feel damp like a wrung-out sponge, not dripping wet. If you pick up a handful of material and it drips without being squeezed, it is too wet. If the material appears dry and crumbles after squeezing, it is too dry. If the material retains its clumped shape after squeezing without releasing excess water and your hand is damp, then it's just right.

Good luck.
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Feb, 2020 04:58 pm
@Tryagain,
Living directly over the boiler room can also turn a place super toasty.
0 Replies
 
 

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