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So? We're living in a renewed era of Nuclear War?

 
 
Reply Mon 14 Oct, 2019 09:55 am
Who had those lovely dreams... ooops... nightmares I mean ... about waking up/living through nuclear war during the height of the Cold War? Remember them? This generation will thank us later ... for they will be afflicted with them too. You're welcome Gen Zers! Sleep poorly tonight!


Alex Wellerstein's Nukemap

With Fascism on the rise and this generations dictator's (Trump included) threatening total destruction upon their enemies; ongoing wars in Kashmir, Syria, and beyond; while several rogue countries doing their damnest to become members of the Nuke Power gang? Things ain't getting better in the near future.

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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 322 • Replies: 8
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Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Oct, 2019 01:56 pm
@tsarstepan,
I went through drills for "what to do in the event of nuclear bombardment" . It didn't bother me as much as it amused me.

In most schools, we would exit to the hallway and stand there. (Never however, opposite the door, as that was dangerous - the glass could hurt us!). And never in the top floor hallway.

The most absurd, had to be when I was in a 6th grade class and we were in a portable classroom. These things were apart from the main building. We exited, walked across to the main building, up a dozen steps, entered the building, up a few more steps, through a door, down a hallway, through another door and then down to the basement.

Even then, I realized it was ridiculous. We would have been dead before we even got to the main building.

Nothing about any of the nuclear weapons stuff scared me. I don't know if anyone else thought this way.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Oct, 2019 02:02 pm
Mineshafts can be converted to underground bunkers.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Oct, 2019 07:21 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

Mineshafts can be converted to underground bunkers.

This is one way to employ coal miners who lost their jobs due to the coal mines being closed.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Oct, 2019 07:26 pm
@tsarstepan,
We cannot allow a mineshaft gap.
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oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Oct, 2019 09:20 pm
tsarstepan wrote:
Who had those lovely dreams... ooops... nightmares I mean ... about waking up/living through nuclear war during the height of the Cold War? Remember them? This generation will thank us later ... for they will be afflicted with them too. You're welcome Gen Zers! Sleep poorly tonight!

I don't think that it will ever get as bad as the 1980s.

The SS-18s and SS-19s alone could have showered the US with more than 5000 half-megaton warheads with just a half-hour's notice.
oralloy
 
  2  
Reply Mon 14 Oct, 2019 09:21 pm
@Sturgis,
Sturgis wrote:
I went through drills for "what to do in the event of nuclear bombardment" . It didn't bother me as much as it amused me.

In most schools, we would exit to the hallway and stand there. (Never however, opposite the door, as that was dangerous - the glass could hurt us!). And never in the top floor hallway.

They were right. You would not have wanted to need treatment for lacerations from flying shards of glass in the aftermath of a nuclear explosion when treatment would have been impossible to acquire.


Sturgis wrote:
The most absurd, had to be when I was in a 6th grade class and we were in a portable classroom. These things were apart from the main building. We exited, walked across to the main building, up a dozen steps, entered the building, up a few more steps, through a door, down a hallway, through another door and then down to the basement.

Even then, I realized it was ridiculous. We would have been dead before we even got to the main building.

Even in the ICBM era, the general public would have received about 20 minutes notice of incoming warheads. If this was before the ICBM era, you may have had notice of several hours.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Oct, 2019 02:45 am
I'm usually a fan of higher yield weapons, but I kind of like the new low-yield/high-accuracy bombs that Obama had us develop.

They will allow nuclear strikes against military targets with minimal collateral damage. Perhaps the world's first "usable" nuke.

http://fas.org/blogs/security/2013/09/b61-12holland/
http://fas.org/blogs/security/2013/10/b61-12hearing/
http://fas.org/blogs/security/2014/01/b61capability/
http://fas.org/blogs/security/2014/02/b61-12pictures/
http://fas.org/blogs/security/2014/03/b61-12integration/
http://fas.org/blogs/security/2014/04/b61-12features/
http://fas.org/blogs/security/2015/11/b61-12_cartwright/
http://fas.org/blogs/security/2016/01/b61-12_earth-penetration/
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Oct, 2019 07:11 am
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:


I don't think that it will ever get as bad as the 1980s.

You're probably right. That since most countries lack submarine fleets (the most difficult to track and defend against delivery system used by the Soviets). At least in terms of nuclear attack and the US. Other countries need to still worry about midrange nuclear attacks and smuggled in improvised bombs.

From an irrational fear perspective? That's still up there population wise.
0 Replies
 
 

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