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Volume # 60/ The Darker Side

 
 
sumac
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 May, 2005 07:31 pm
I would be surprised at that information too, as the numbers of native Americans, in relation to their traditional habitats, were not that great. And, there was generally some form of moving around from season to season.

However, having said that, humans have certainly played a crucial role in extinction, so why not in this instance also?

I saw a very brief reference on the nightly news the other night, out of China, that bird flu has now been detected in migrating geese. Has anyone else seen or heard anything about this?

Must go click.
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Thinkzinc
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 May, 2005 07:49 pm
Hey ehBeth,
Yes, I'm sure that 43 acres is in sight!
Such a lot of clicking! Smile
Thanks for the email alerting me to this 60th thread!
I've been clicking pretty regularly these days, thanks to setting up a shortcut on my Firefox toolbar. But I'm not sure if my clicks are going towards the Wildclickers total or not! Shocked I copied the link for my bookmark from the threads here, but when I click on the link, it doesn't seem to show a code in my address, it just seems to go to the main site?! Do you have anyway of telling if my clicks are going to the Wildclickers total? I'm registered as thinkzinc, known as J, if that's any help? It says on my page that I have no friends Sad But I'm hoping the clicks do go to your total! Razz Thanks for any info! Very Happy
And! Happy clicking!
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 May, 2005 11:53 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Got that (I just thought, because you spoke of smaller towns, you'd found a different one. [Dresden had a population of 600,000 plus a couple of hundredthousands of refugees :wink: ].)


Walter, I was refering to Dresden, but will research and see if I can find a site featuring pre and post war German town(s) photos for ya. Smile

Nuremberg Revisited - http://www.robertsarmory.com/nur.htm

Kassel ~ http://www.kassel.de/content/index.php?parent=50
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 12:05 am
Here are some issues facing reservation American Indians

Natural Resource Mining and Pollution
Mineral wealth has proved a mixed blessing for some western Indian reservations, raising questions of balancing development and environment. Beginning as early as 1900 with the discovery of oil on Osage land, nonrenewable resource development has unleashed some of the most environmentally destructive forms of exploitation. Today, mine and drilling sites, roads and machinery, tailing piles and settling ponds threaten tribal land, water, air, health, and lifestyles. Inequitable leases and federal, state, and tribal government mismanagement have compounded these problems. Despite efforts by pan-Indian organizations like the Council of Energy Resource Tribes to balance use and protection of resources, mining and oil and gas exploration has scarred thousands of acres with minimal protection for inhabitants.

The Navajo and Hopi reservations in Utah and Arizona provide two examples. When Congress enlarged the Navajo Reservation with the Aneth extension in southeast Utah in 1933, it reserved 37.5 percent of any future oil or gas royalties for Utah Navajos, to be administered in trust by the state. The remaining 62.5 percent went to the Navajo Nation. Since the 1956 discovery of oil at Aneth and Montezuma Creek, Utah, oil companies have drilled 577 wells and pumped an estimated 370.7 million barrels of oil and another 339,100 cubic feet of natural gas from the area. In the process they contaminated ground water and area springs by injecting carbon dioxide and saltwater into wells to increase production. In 1990, there were ninety-nine spills of oil, saltwater, and chemicals in the Aneth fields, damaging 36,622 acres. Oil companies have been lax in cleaning up their sites or compensating Navajos. "There are no environmental rules or regulations here," complained Navajo councilman Andrew Tso. "No one cares about the people who live here, just the oil."

On the other hand, oil companies have paid at least $180 million in royalties, including $60 million to the Utah Navajo Trust Fund. But little has trickled down to Aneth residents. Seventy-five percent of the 6,500 Utah Navajos in the region have no electricity or running water. Most make a hundred-mile round trip each week to haul in water. Recent audits disclosed that state and tribal mismanagement, poor business decisions, fraud, and bribes have bankrupted the Utah Navajo Trust Fund. In addition, the Navajo Nation has not returned to its Utah chapter houses a fraction of the oil revenues it collects. And now oil production in Aneth is steadily falling. In 1994, the Navajo Nation Council created its own Navajo Oil and Gas Company and imposed a moratorium on oil and gas drilling in Aneth, calling for the enforcement of federal environmental protection laws. The drilling continues.

The second example involves British-owned Peabody Coal Company which operates two huge strip mines on the remote and sacred Black Mesa, leased from the Hopi and Navajo tribes. The leases - dating back to 1964 and renegotiated in 1987 because of abysmal royalty rates - allow them to mine 670 million tons of high-grade, low-sulfur coal from a 64,858 acre site. Each year, 7 million tons of coal from the Kayenta Mine is shipped by electric railroad 78 miles to the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Arizona. Coal from the smaller Black Mesa Mine travels 273 miles in three days through an eighteen-inch diameter coal slurry pipeline around the Grand Canyon to the Mohave Generating Station near Laughlin, Nevada. Each ton of coal requires 270 gallons of water. Each day Peabody pumps 3.9 million gallons of water from the Navajo Sandstone Aquifer, 3,000 feet below Black Mesa and the Hopi Reservation - more than 1.4 billion gallons each year to transport 5 million tons of coal. At Mohave, the water is separated and used in the power plant's cooling towers, while the coal fuels the 1,580-megawatt plant operated by Southern California Edison for two million electric customers in southern California and Nevada. Almost as afterthought, both the Navajo and Mohave generating plants return a sulfur dioxide haze that hangs over the Grand Canyon and Four Corners region.

Mindful of the employment and the $9 million they receive in annual coal royalties (70 percent of their tribal budget), Hopis are still critical of the use of their water to slurry coal. "We're not against southern California getting electricity," Hopi Chairman Vernon Masayesva said in 1990. "They could still benefit from our coal resources. It just seems foolish to be using water as a transportation method from a desert climate where you have an average rainfall of six to seven inches." Despite findings to the contrary by a controversial federal environmental impact statement and a 1993 independent study, Hopis insist that pumping is dropping the region's water table, drying up sacred springs and washes that once carried water to their fields. Fifty miles from Black Mesa at Moenkopi village (Hopi, meaning "a place where water flows"), farmer Sam Shingoitewa observed, "We know that our water table is lowering. Of course, some of it is existing because of present conditions, no rain and all that. But if they weren't doing it, there would be some water running down the wash right now." Hopis petitioned the federal government to exercise its trust responsibility and withhold Peabody's permanent operating permit until the company quit pumping or examined alternate water sources. After Arizonan Bruce Babbitt became Interior secretary, Peabody announced in 1994 it was considering a ninety-mile pipeline to lift water from Lake Powell for the slurry pipeline.

http://www.ehso.com/ehshome/Native%20Americans%20and%20the%20Environment.htm
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 12:26 am
Stradee wrote:
Walter, I was refering to Dresden, but will research and see if I can find a site featuring pre and post war German town(s) photos for ya. Smile


No need, I've got some myself :wink:
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Joan Lee
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 04:42 am
Hi everyone!

Still clicking away and reading your interesting input. Thanks,

Joan Lee
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 07:33 am
Fascinating stuff, Stradee. One has to wonder: if the US government had not placed tribes on 'undesirable' lands in reservations, thus impoverishing and diminishing their resources for decades, how would they have responded to present demands for oil and mineral removal?
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danon5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 08:26 am
Morning all,

Clicked - - - - - - - - - - - -
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 09:53 am
sumac, an interesting webpage regarding the lawsuit filed against the government for "mismanagement" of Indian Tribal funds.

http://www.naswdc.org/diversity/native2003/tribal2003.asp


Tribal businesses have contributed to $10 billion in wage and salary income to the United States and created more than 300,000 jobs. This has generated more than $4-6 billion in federal tax revenue annually. The Native American art and craft industry generates more than $1 billion every year. On the state and local government levels, tribal communities contribute $246 million in tax revenues annually, and the combined purchases of goods from reservations total $5.5 billion dollars annually.
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 10:09 am
sumac wrote:
Fascinating stuff, Stradee. One has to wonder: if the US government had not placed tribes on 'undesirable' lands in reservations, thus impoverishing and diminishing their resources for decades, how would they have responded to present demands for oil and mineral removal?


The only way inuits could advance from reservation arrest was utilizing treaties for their economic betterment, plus attempting to maintain their traditions.
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pwayfarer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 10:18 am
Thanks for the new thread Sumac. Clicking in.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 05:00 pm
Thinkzinc wrote:
Hey ehBeth,
Yes, I'm sure that 43 acres is in sight!
Such a lot of clicking! Smile
Thanks for the email alerting me to this 60th thread!

<snip>
Do you have anyway of telling if my clicks are going to the Wildclickers total? I'm registered as thinkzinc, known as J, if that's any help?!



Thinkzinc - and everyone else who got the notice about the new thread through an email - the reason you got the email is that you are registered as a member of the aktbird57 account at care2.

It's a bit of a job, but if you'd like, I can follow (one at a time) your clicks for a few days to see if they are registering. I recall doing that with JoanLee when she first joined the WildClickers (aka aktbird57 team). I sent Joan a couple of emails through the account, just confirming that her clicks were continuing to register.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 05:02 pm
aktbird57

You and your 283 friends have supported 1,859,069.5 square feet!

Marine Wetlands habitat supported: 40,448.7 square feet.
You have supported: (0.0)
Your 283 friends have supported: (40,448.7)

American Prairie habitat supported: 35,226.6 square feet.
You have supported: (9,925.6)
Your 283 friends have supported: (25,301.1)

Rainforest habitat supported: 1,783,394.1 square feet.
You have supported: (160,793.5)
Your 283 friends have supported: (1,622,600.6)
[/size][/color]



<thanks to whoever got #60 featured within the Wilderness, Wildlife & Ecology forum>
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 05:05 pm
Today, the account shows that Thinkzinc has clicked 155 times that were credited to the aktbird5 account.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

JoanLee is at 244 clicks for the WildClickers (and the world in general)!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Way to go, team![/color][/size]
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 05:18 pm
Care2 == Peta2 ???
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Thinkzinc
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 06:42 pm
Thanks Beth! I thought my email address had maybe been picked up on Abuzz, didn't realise it had come through the Care2 site. Glad my clicks are going towards the team!
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 06:46 pm
Hi again, Thinkzinc.
I'll track your clicks over the next week or so.
Does the care2 site thank you by name after you've clicked?
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 06:59 pm
Just found this thread just now. Thanks, Sumac. (Eye hev clicked.)
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 07:07 pm
Oh dear.

Here is Merry Andrew. The only WildClicker with a typo in his e-ddress.

I keep forgetting that I should send you a separate note, MA.

Sad
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HofT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2005 08:30 pm
Sumac - thanks for new thread, great to see your computer up and running Smile

Speaking of the darker side: Voyager 1, launched 28 years ago, is now finally hitting the boundary between the end of the solar (our sol, that is!) wind and the gas particles of interstellar space:

http://www.universetoday.com/am/uploads/2005-0524voyager-lg.jpg

"For their original missions to Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager 1 and sister spacecraft Voyager 2 were destined for regions of space far from the Sun where solar panels would not be feasible, so each was equipped with three radioisotope thermoelectric generators to produce electrical power for the spacecraft systems and instruments. Still operating in remote, cold and dark conditions 27 years later, the Voyagers owe their longevity to these Department of Energy-provided generators, which produce electricity from the heat generated by the natural decay of plutonium dioxide. "
_____________________________________________________________
http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/voyager_enters_heliosheath.html?2452005
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