1
   

problems with philosophy of science and reason in general notwithstanding

 
 
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2019 12:27 am
Would "generally" be better than "in general" here?


Context:

He aims to carve a third path between secularists who say morality is subjective (e.g. moral relativists), and religionists who say that morality is given by God and scripture. Harris contends that the only moral framework worth talking about is one where "morally good" things pertain to increases in the "well-being of conscious creatures". He then argues that, problems with philosophy of science and reason in general notwithstanding, 'moral questions' will have objectively right and wrong answers which are grounded in empirical facts about what causes people to flourish.

Source
 
View best answer, chosen by oristarA
Jewels Vern
 
  0  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2019 03:48 pm
not·with·stand·ing
/ˌnätwiTHˈstandiNG,ˌnätwiT͟HˈstandiNG/
preposition
1.
in spite of.
"notwithstanding the evidence, the consensus is that the jury will not reach a verdict"
synonyms: in spite of, despite, regardless of, for all
"notwithstanding the evidence, the consensus is that the jury will not reach a verdict"
adverb
1.
nevertheless; in spite of this.
"I didn't like it. Notwithstanding, I remained calm"
synonyms: nevertheless, nonetheless, even so, all the same, in spite of this/that, despite this/that, after everything, however, still, yet, be that as it may, having said that, that said, for all that, just the same, anyway, in any event, at any rate, at all events, when all is said and done; More
conjunction
1.
although; in spite of the fact that.
"notwithstanding that the hall was packed with bullies, our champion played on steadily and patiently"
synonyms: although, in spite of the fact that, despite the fact that, even though, though, for all that
"notwithstanding that Sir Henry had sold much land, his debts were still on the increase"
~ google

Let's rewrite this. "In spite of [problems with philosophy of science] and [reason in general], 'moral questions' will have objectively right and wrong answers."

Replacing the goofy words with more familiar words and marking off the clauses, we see that the sentence is gramatically correct as it stands. This is the strong feature of philosophy: replacing easily understood words with unfamiliar words, and then combining unfamiliar words with esoteric concepts and goofy names, they manage to fill pages without ever saying anything of substance.

In this case the fallacy is a misused word: "moral". When two or more people live in the same area they have to adopt some rules about who does what to whom. Any such rule is called a more', French accented e pronounced "mor-ay". The adjective form is moral, and the habit of following more's is morality. More's are arbitrary: they do not have to be right, only accepted. Another group on the other side of the river might have very different more's. So this author's reference to "objectively right and wrong answers" is simply a mistake. He has not adequately studied his subject.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2019 09:39 pm
@oristarA,
They're synonymous; either is acceptable.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2019 03:04 pm
generally notwithstanding, ...

Science and reason in general notwithstanding,

These do not have the same meaning.


InfraBlue
 
  4  
Reply Sat 20 Apr, 2019 12:14 am
"Problems with philosophy of science and reason generally notwithstanding", and "problems with philosophy of science and reason in general notwithstanding" do have the same meaning, however.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Apr, 2019 12:15 am
@PUNKEY,
In that case you shouldn't have any difficulty detailing the different meanings.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 22 Apr, 2019 06:45 pm
In this introductory phrase ...
generally notwithstanding: “generally” is an adverb that describes “how much” is the level of notwithstanding, much like if totally or somewhat was used.

Science and reason in general: “in general” is an adjective that describes science and reason, as opposed to specifically or sometimes.
TheSubliminalKid
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 03:40 am
@PUNKEY,
"In general" in this context would count as an adverbial phrase, so the meaning is interchangeable.

https://linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/21177/is-the-adverbial-phrase-and-adverb-phrase-identical/21178
PUNKEY
 
  0  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 01:52 pm
@TheSubliminalKid,
Here’s a simplified way to show my view. Note the difference:

Problems in general notwithstanding, he made it to class every day.

Problems with his car in general notwithstanding, he made it to class everyday.
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 02:18 pm
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:

Here’s a simplified way to show my view. Note the difference:

Problems in general notwithstanding, he made it to class every day.

Problems with his car in general notwithstanding, he made it to class everyday.


Those are two different sentences. Within the context of oristarA's sentence, "in general" and "generally" convey the same meaning and are interchangeable.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 03:22 pm
@PUNKEY,
Two replies later you still can't say what the difference is in meaning. You can't say it because there is none. You say different terms describe different things but you've no idea what that difference is, because there is none.

Then you change the subject with another pair of sentences that add absolutely nothing.

Let me simplify it for you. You're wrong, you're sounding increasingly absurd.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Is this comma splice? Is it proper? - Question by DaveCoop
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
Is the second "playing needed? - Question by tanguatlay
should i put "that" here ? - Question by Chen Ta
Unbeknownst to me - Question by kuben123
alternative way - Question by Nousher Ahmed
Could check my grammar mistakes please? - Question by LonelyGamer
 
  1. Forums
  2. » problems with philosophy of science and reason in general notwithstanding
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 09/16/2019 at 06:02:40