2
   

How do you prefer your steak?

 
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Feb, 2003 07:08 pm
of course i only have steak every year or two. burgers slightly more often, but not much.
0 Replies
 
bigdice67
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2003 09:15 am
Medium rare, cooked on a small flame for a good time... then take it away and let it rest for two minutes... then you don't have a plate full of meat-juice, and the meat is still medium-rare and warm in the middle!

I like my steak tartar, and my carpaccio too!
0 Replies
 
Sugar
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2003 09:23 am
I like it medium rare, but I really love it raw. I made a special trip to Abe & Louie's a few weeks ago for steak tartare....mmmmmm.........

As long as it's still red and bloody in the middle it's all good.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2003 09:28 am
You'd get along well with my dad sugar.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2003 12:14 pm
Here's a great way to make a steak if you don't have a grill. Heat the oven to 350 F. On the stovetop, heat a cast iron or other ovenproof skillet until very hot. Now, season one side of a 1.5" thick steak with salt, pepper, and a little cajun seasoning. Put the steak in the pan seasoned side down and cook for one minute, or until a crust forms and it flips easily. Very quick. Now, immediately place the pan in the oven and cook until done to your liking, about 10 minutes for medium rare. Remove and let sit for five minutes before carving. Great for rainy days too.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2003 01:26 pm

Good steak, medium rare! So tender you could cut it with a spoon! Mmmmmmmmm!

Don't usually have steak for breakfast, but.......


Waaaahhhh...out of steak!
0 Replies
 
Equus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2003 01:49 pm
For a great spoon-eating steak, simply drop in blender (debone first), set on puree, add steak sauce to taste and pour.
0 Replies
 
urs53
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2003 02:03 pm
I love it the way BigDice cooks it - see above :-)
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Feb, 2003 08:22 pm
Equus - there's something astray with your advice. Just can't put a finger on what at present, but....... Confused

Heathen!
0 Replies
 
kitchenpete
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Feb, 2003 10:52 am
Strangely enough, for someone who was a veggie until a year ago, I returned to my former delight in a steak cooked "Bleu".

Just enough to scorch the outside, but no more than a faint hint of an edge when you cut it and look from the side - the middle should be pure red!

So I had to vote for "Rare", which is what I would order for a less expensive cut, to warm the connective tissue through!

Best steak since I started eating meat again: Tournedos Rossini at Hotel Adlon in Berlin.

That's a filet steak on fois gras and toast, served with a reduction of beef juices which cling to the meat! Just as it was being served (the whole table of 7 being attended by waiters, ready to lift the silver domes) a motorcade with Kofi Annan pulled up outside - he was staying there!

Actually I'd seen him the previous day on my flight from London, and took my bag down (very carefully) from above his head! Not often I've been that close to one of my real heroes!

Sorry for the digression/bragging - it was prompted by the memory of that steak...so tender, even in its almost uncooked state!
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Feb, 2003 11:41 am
I wonder if there's some kind of former vegetarian/blue steak now connection?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2003 12:02 am
Rare, but edging toward medium rare, but only a little wee bit, STOP. For all practical purposes, in restaurants, rare, so I checked the wrong thing. Ah, well.
0 Replies
 
pueo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2003 12:11 am
warm is good enough for me.....
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2003 12:39 am
My father likes it so rare that a skilled vet could save it.
0 Replies
 
gezzy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2003 05:13 am
LOL Wilso Laughing
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2003 05:20 am
i like em marinated first (this protects against forming nitosamines) then I want them grilled so they are burnt on the outside and rare in the middle.
However, I cant eat a big piece of beef anymore. I prefer a small tastier cut like porterhouse, then a lot of veggie sides.
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Mar, 2003 12:37 pm
Aahh, kitchenpete....you bring back memories of chefs school...certainly a classic, tournedos rossini...

Lol Wilso, one day I may use that vet statement of yours Very Happy

Personally, I go for the blue rare to rare steak, depending on the cut. I use mostly well-marbled Black Angus beef, and there is barely any chance of getting sick from a good quality cut of beef that is not being fed sheep guts or whatever other horrid pseudo-cannibalistic diet....

My preference is striploin and ribeye, boneless, and conveniently both availible from the same larger cut of beef, the rib section. Bone-in is tasty, but a little Barney Rubble for my tastes, although I do an awesome prime rib roast, marinated with vodka, bay leaf, coarse salt and fresh cracked pepper. Also, flank steak, marinated in soy, fish sauce and a touch of sugar works great on the grill, served rare to pink in thin slices. I serve it with a Thai-style red onion salsa, with lots of chilies, mint and coriander, also lime juice and more fish sauce.
0 Replies
 
kitchenpete
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Mar, 2003 08:38 am
cav,

Please share your recipe/tips for roast rib - it's a wonderful joint of meat and the thought of vodka with it sounds great!

KP
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Mar, 2003 11:00 am
kitchenpete, first off, there are two things in this recipe that I would been shot for at chefs school, but all I know is that they work: using salt in the marinade, and letting it marinate at room temperature for a supposedley 'dangerous' amount of time.

For a 5-7 rib roast:

1/2 cup vodka
3 tbsp. coarse sea salt
1 tbsp. fresh cracked pepper, or to taste
12 bay leaves

I like to do this in a giant bowl or container that can be covered after while the roast marinates. Rub the roast all over with the vodka. Rub in the salt and pepper, especially on the fat cap. Cut 12 pockets evenly into the fat cap and slip in the bay leaves. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 2 hours.

Preheat oven to 425. Put roast in a pan and roast for 30 minutes. Turn heat down to 325 and roast 12-15 minutes per pound for rare to medium rare, or 18-20 per pound if you like medium well to well done (yuck). The vodka helps break down the structure of the fat cap, as does the salt, so the cap comes out beutifully tender, melt-in-your mouth good, and the meat as well. So far, this recipe has never steered me wrong, and leftovers make great sandwiches. The recipe can be halved for a 2-3 rib roast, if you aren't cooking for a lot of people.
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Mar, 2003 11:02 am
And don't mind the typos, lol
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Quiznos - Discussion by cjhsa
Should We Eat Our American Neighbours? - Question by mark noble
Favorite Italian Food? - Discussion by cjhsa
The Last Thing You Put In Your Mouth.... - Discussion by Dorothy Parker
Dessert suggestions, please? - Discussion by msolga
 
Copyright © 2024 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 06/16/2024 at 09:36:37