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The usage of "gob", frequented by MontereyJack

 
 
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2016 09:57 pm
Does it mean "mind your big mouth"? Or simply refers it to McGentrix?

Thanks in anticipation

Context:

@McGentrix,
It's democracy we live on , gob, from the Greek "demos", "people", not "stateocracy" (which is kind of a bastardized word since i don't know what the Greek word for our cocept of state is).

@McGentrix,
No, gob, the people DO NOT determine who wins. You'e wrong. Thts why Trump is president -elect.
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 1,472 • Replies: 21

 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2016 10:06 pm
@oristarA,
Quote:
gob1
ɡäb/
informal
noun
1. a lump or clot of a slimy or viscous substance.
"a gob of phlegm"
NORTH AMERICAN
a small lump.
2. NORTH AMERICAN
a lot of.
"he wants to make gobs of money selling cassettes"
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2016 10:09 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I seem to have got it.
Does it simply mean "boo!"?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2016 10:14 pm
@oristarA,
I've never heard it used it that way. The British seem to use it in a way that means 'mouth', but I'm guessing on their meaning.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2016 10:15 pm
@oristarA,
It can mean many different things, but I think the following is the most common.
often gobs Informal A large quantity: a gob of money; gobs of time.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2016 10:29 pm
@cicerone imposter,
When it was in MJ's post "No, gob, the people DO NOT determine who wins. You'e wrong. Thts why Trump is president -elect", what does it particularly refer to?
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2016 10:29 pm
@cicerone imposter,
When it was in MJ's post "No, gob, the people DO NOT determine who wins. You'e wrong. Thts why Trump is president -elect", what does it particularly refer to?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2016 10:33 pm
@oristarA,
In that usage, I cannot even offer a guess.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 10:18 am
@roger,
roger wrote:

The British seem to use it in a way that means 'mouth', but I'm guessing on their meaning.

Yeah, it does mean mouth, as it 'shut yer gob,' or 'stick that in yer gob.'

We also use the term gobby to refer to someone loud and opinionated with very little to actually back it up.
McGentrix
 
  3  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 10:33 am
According to MontereyJack, he was using gob as an abbreviation for GeorgeOB
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 10:38 am
@McGentrix,
Haha!
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 10:52 am
Another meaning: Sometimes American sailors are called gobs.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 01:05 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:
We also use the term gobby to refer to someone loud and opinionated with very little to actually back it up.

Don't forget 'gobshite'.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 01:11 pm
In the Pittsburgh region of the USA 'gob' is a local word for a dessert also known as 'whoopee pie' (I am not making this up). It is made of two round mound-shaped pieces of chocolate cake, or sometimes pumpkin or gingerbread cake, with a sweet, creamy filling or frosting sandwiched between them. Allegedly it is the official State Treat of Maine, not to be confused with the State Dessert which is blueberry pie (I am not making this up either).



roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 01:37 pm
@contrex,
Sounds like you are.
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 01:42 pm
@roger,
Oddly, it's for real.

www.pittsburghese.com/glossary.ep.html?type=nouns

Pittsburgh a beautiful place with a number or weird words.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 01:59 pm
@Sturgis,
And here's some recipes: http://www.raisinandfig.com/gobs-aka-whoopie-pies/
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 02:22 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:
Sounds like you are.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/8e/d2/9d/8ed29db786329199a82352e5603bbe00.jpg
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 02:24 pm
@contrex,
Yeah, I forgot. They make and actually eat stuff like scrapple in Pennsylvania.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2016 03:02 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:
Yeah, I forgot. They make and actually eat stuff like scrapple in Pennsylvania.

If you mean Pan Rabbit, a mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal and wheat flour, often buckwheat flour, and spices, sliced and fried, we have stuff like that in Britain, one variety is called haslet, which I actually quite like. Round Birmingham they have something called Groaty Pudding or Groaty Dick (I'm not making this up either.) which is beef based rather than pork. I have never had this, but next time I go there I might look for some. Also I like brawn, sometime called 'head cheese' (true) . This is brawn:
http://gotzinge.icmsdemo.com/icart/products/52/images/main/56.jpg

 

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