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Yogurt and You

 
 
littlek
 
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:17 am
Edit [Moderator]: Moved from General to Food & Drink.

I have realized that yogurt is a relatively new food in the US. Sometime before I was born, the health food whacos were praising the stuff and immigrants were pining for it, but my understanding is that it wasn't sold at the grocery store (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong). Slowly that changed and then word came that yogurt was great for you.

But, I still think men feel yogurt is for the women. So, the poll* is to try and find out who does and who doesn't eat yogurt. Just for fun. Thanks.





*I realized too late that my poll choices could have been better worded.... sorry to be ethnocentric and all.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 5,317 • Replies: 55
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the prince
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:24 am
Yogurt normally forms a part a breakfast (flavored) and dinner (plain)

It is a big part of every Indian meal - I love it anyways, and I make several different kind of Raita's to make it more intersteing !!
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:27 am
Oh, really? My sister loves raita. So, what are the tweaks you do?

Hey, y'all, feel free to expand on the topic down here.
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J-B
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:33 am
yogurt is good.
I've heard that it is as nutritious milk and has less cholesterol than it
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:33 am
So far everyone has said yes.
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:34 am
I eat it!

I don't remember it being around much in the 60s. The health food crazes of the 70s seems to have made it more popular.

Men probably DO see it as being more for women but mostly, I think, because that's how it's marketed. If there is a yourt ad on TV or in a magazine it'll feature a woman in it 99% of the time. It's seldom marketed toward men.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:35 am
yogurt is milk and then some. It have bacteria in it that is good for your gut. The extra bacteria have a milkiness to their flavor, so even non-fat yogurt is fairly rich.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:36 am
Fishin - you're right, it is marketed towards women. Aren't you a new convert?
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billbudd
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:43 am
I can't believe I'm on the internet talking about yogurt. I need to get a life!
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Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:43 am
littlek- As a much younger person, I remember that there was yoghurt, but there was little variety. And yes, it WAS considered a weird food.

I remember that I got hooked onto yoghurt as a very young woman. After a few months, I took a look at a cup of it one day, and didn't touch the stuff for a few decades. Some years ago, I rediscovered the stuff.

Years ago, there was not much choice. Dannon had the fruit on the bottom, which masked the slightly tart flavor of the product. Yoghurt was a very pupular lunch item for young working women on diets when I was young.

Over the years, traditional yoghurt has been supplanted by all kinds of custardy stuff, which does taste better than the unadorned stuff.

"Real" yoghurt has active bacterial cultures. (Check the package). Whenever I take an antibiotic, I eats lots of yoghurt. This prevents the diarrhea which often accompanies using antibiotics. The reason is that in addition to killing the "bad" bacteria, the antibiotics kill the intestinal flora which regulates the gastrointestinal system. Yoghurt replaces the flora, thus preventing the "runs".


Quote:
Dannon was founded by Isaac Carasso in 1919.
DANNON introduced yogurt with fruit on the bottom in 1947.
The DANNON Institute, an independent, non-profit foundation dedicated to nutrition research, was founded in 1997.


http://www.dannon.com/dn/dnstore/cgi-
bin/ProdSubEV_Cat_240861_NavRoot_200.htm
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Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:45 am
Quote:
I can't believe I'm on the internet talking about yogurt. I need to get a life!


billbudd - Welcome to A2K! Very Happy - Yoghurt is much more fun than politics! Laughing
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Smartsux
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:48 am
Actually, just to let you know, I'm sorry, but I accidentally clicked yes-woman, instead of no-woman.
Although if raita is considered "yogurt" then I do like it.
All I know is my mom ate it to prevent yeast infection. Embarrassed
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:49 am
littlek wrote:
Fishin - you're right, it is marketed towards women. Aren't you a new convert?


Not really. I've been eating it off and on for 20 or so years. I just had to become a little more picky about what kinds of yogurt I was picking up. I concentrated on taste without regards to any health benefits before. Wink
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 09:00 am
The big runner in the supermatkets no is the "oldstyle" yogurt - plain yoghurt in real glass with the fruit at the bottom. (Which brought back remembrance to schooldays forty years back, when I spooned it recently :wink: )
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Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 09:54 am
I can't be the only hippie-in-a-former-life/back to-the-lander in this group who made their own yogurt, am I?

My yoga teacher wife (she was the Himalayan Yoga Center of Tulsa) and I (organic gardener, bread maker and all-things ovo-lacto-vegetarian freak) combined our efforts on such enterprises as making our own soy cheese and milk, grinding red wheat into flour, drying fruit leather and yes, making our own yogurt in quart mason jars. I got very good at reading a dial thermometer because temperature is critical throughout the whole process. The day I found the instant read thermometer at the hardware store changed my life.

The yogurt went into soups, got mixed into bread dough (yum ah-aum), poured over granola, slopped onto steamed vegetables or we simply drank the stuff right out of the jar. The stuff we made was semi-pourable, not like the mayonnaise thick stuff you get in the Dannon cups, more like that of a chowder or mushroom soup. It was tangy, yes, that's the right word, tangy.

I made six to eight quarts of yogurt and six loaves of bread Saturday after Saturday after Saturday, between refereeing the boy's soccer games and mowing the rest of the yard. The bread got frozen right out of the pans but the yogurt had to be used up by Friday night or it would go bad. (We had dogs. Sophia the boxer and Duchess the doberman. I believe Sophia prayed to her god-dog for one jar to get a little bad, she loved the stuff either plain or over chow.)

Everyone should try to make some things, bread or yogurt, of course, it will spoil you forever and you will eat but never again be content with store bought bread or little cups of white gelatinized stuff with a scoop of unidentifiable fruit-like residue on the bottom.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 12:01 pm
I bought a used yogurt maker, but was too scared to ever use it. My housemate and I have been trying to make banana bread (I know, you're not talking about THAT type of bread, are you?) with yogurt. We have only had one successful batch. O wise master of yogurt, what are we doing wrong?
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Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 12:12 pm
Well, first of all, he said (looking through his astral-veiwer) into littlek's kitchen, "The bananas aren't ripe enough...... "

how do I know that?

Because the bananas are never ripe enough.

Really, I don't know

(puts cap back onto astral-viewer after quick look down the hall to see if anyone is napping--- Nope... must be out at the park on a day like this....)

What do the loaves come out like?
You got a good oven? Half the time bread has problems because the temperature or the timing is off.

Describe what your results have been so far and me and the gang here will try to divine an answer -- Hey, we could do that for any number of subject and have kind of a message board where people could go and ask questions and be able to know.


In fact.....
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 12:15 pm
<grin>

They generally come out underdone inside (wet) and overdone outside (thick and hard). I assume it's too much liquid. My housemate seems to think she can add the yogurt to any recipe without getting rid of some of that recipe's liquids. And, my oven sucks. It's an old, cheap gas oven that runs a teeny bit hot.

And, believe me, the bananas are very close to ripe enough.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 12:19 pm
I remember one Political Science class at university, where we discussed nearly the complete semester only the making of 'proper, original' yogurt and the decline of yoghurt making.

The result was: real yoghurt is yoghurt, just and only yoghurt with nothing else in it - besides you add it before eating.

The rest of the time left, we talked about bread (not only for the masses Laughing ).
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 12:25 pm
This was a polisci class? Odd.
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