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Artists are dead now?

 
 
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 06:52 am
The age of the 'singular artists' or 'creative genuis' is over. What does anyone think?
I basically think unless you are pretty much all these things: lucky, talented, rich and well connected, then there is no way of becoming just 'a painter' or 'a sculptor' or 'a director' anymore. Or maybe there is but only by having the best bullshit ever, or working 18 hours a day forever.
I think the world has moved on really and it's now how you implement those skills to create something new. E.g. http://futurecity.co.uk/
 
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 08:22 am
@The Pentacle Queen,
Everything is patented - Try inventing/marketing something.
If it has an element (periodic) in its composition - No Go.
If it has a chord, note, texture, colour, etc... - OWNED ALREADY.
Why do you think 80% of 'Freescale' super/semiconductors' owners vanished on mh370, leaving Jacob Rothschild the sole 20%-100% outright owner of all tech derived from?
FOREVER...
Now - Go invent a free-energy device:)
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 10:17 am
@mark noble,
Lord Kelvin said that everything that could be invented, already has. He said this back in the time of Darwin's later life.

0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 11:28 am
@The Pentacle Queen,
My wife, son, and I visited the de Young Museum in San Francisco yesterday. There are art works by contemporaries I've never heard of, but was impressed by the quality and expression of those art works.
I'm always impressed by the quality of art from centuries ago; the imagination and detail of their sculptures. Many from Latin America that represented their gods.
Black and white photographs from the 1950s of people and places.
Impressionist paintings by Americans.
And to end the tour on the tower that overlooks the whole of San Francisco.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 12:06 pm
@cicerone imposter,
and Giovanni Batista Granata was the first one to do the guitar licks in "Stairway to Heaven" , and that was done in the 17th century. SO he could sue all these guys
Blickers
 
  3  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 12:11 pm
@mark noble,
Quote Mark Noble:
Quote:
If it has a chord, note, texture, colour, etc... - OWNED ALREADY.


You can't copyright the chords of a song. As Jethro Tull found out when they toured with the Eagles.

Tes yeux noirs
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 12:40 pm
I think Grayson Perry and Tracey Emin are examples of creative geniuses.

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cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 02:12 pm
@farmerman,
We used to attend the San Francisco Symphony for over 13 years, until I got tired of the 40 mile drive (one way). We heard some of the world's best artists, and some of the conductors were also world renowned. Michael Tilson Thomas and Seiji Ozawa were at the top of the music world, and we were fortunate to hear the likes of Midori, Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Andre Watts, Isaac Stern, and Vladimir Horowitz (and many more; names I can't remember).
Don't even know whether any of them are still alive.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  0  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 04:04 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
I don't agree.

First of all true genius will will out, and secondly there are so many niche markets today that even minor artists can make a good living.
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 05:55 pm
@Blickers,
Blickers wrote:

Quote Mark Noble:
Quote:
If it has a chord, note, texture, colour, etc... - OWNED ALREADY.


You can't copyright the chords of a song. As Jethro Tull found out when they toured with the Eagles.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xny0Uj4--tk[/youtube]


That could explain why I never cared for that song. Smile
0 Replies
 
carpetsindubai
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2016 10:28 pm
Not exactly but it looks like! There are some of the creative artists still around the world but not that type of good.
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ossobuco
 
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Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 05:53 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
To me, art is first personal. It happened long ago when the first human or maybe a precursor put a finger in the sand or dirt and played with what happened if you moved the finger around. The nature of the business of the different fields of art over centuries keeps changing, but people will likely want to draw or make music or dance or emote in front of others for a long time to come. Monetary value? Not the most important aspect of art, again, to me. The creativity itself is important, along with the "vision" you may find yourself gaining as you play/work with your voice, your guitar, your water colors, your camera. Maybe someone else will be interested in what you do, and that is additive, the communication that goes on through the art.

So, no, artists are not dead now. Hey, perhaps starving, but that is also a long term art mode.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 07:11 pm
@ossobuco,
I agree that art is first personal, because we all come from a varied perspective of what we deem to be beautiful.
I never cared for modern art where the 'artist' splatters paint on a canvas. I like the more traditional, classic, art that is more realistic like impressionism or realism.
I still remember my visit to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam many decades ago. When they had a special exhibit of Van Gogh paintings at the Art Institute in Chicago when we lived in Naperville - about two lifetimes ago - we made the trip into Chicago to see it. As I recall (if my memory serves), I also attended a special Van Gogh exhibit in Toronto.
My wife and I also made a special trip down to Los Angeles in 1998 to see the Van Gogh exhibit.
I have a poster of one of his artworks in our bedroom.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 07:17 pm
@cicerone imposter,
When I'm in a really strange mood, I sometimes wonder if those paint splatters are really good, but you and I are not sufficiently enlightened.


Nah!
cicerone imposter
 
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Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 07:31 pm
@roger,
I know you've heard of this before, but they do have psychological benefits.
Quote:
The Rorschach test (/ˈrɔːrʃɑːk/ or /ˈrɔərʃɑːk/,[3] German pronunciation: [ˈʀoːɐ̯ʃax]; also known as the Rorschach inkblot test, the Rorschach technique, (or simply the inkblot test) is a psychological test in which subjects' perceptions of inkblots are recorded and then analyzed using psychological interpretation, complex algorithms, or both. Some psychologists use this test to examine a person's personality characteristics and emotional functioning. It has been employed to detect underlying thought disorder, especially in cases where patients are reluctant to describe their thinking processes openly.[4] The test is named after its creator, Swiss psychologist Hermann Rorschach.


I think it can be soothing for some people.
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ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 07:55 pm
I'm not generally a splatter fan either, but every so often I'll like one. I've had various friends that were more into some kinds of art that left me cold to start with, but I warmed up to once I got what some of the new work (to me) was about.

I have a fair art bookshelf (it's actually metal shelving from Home Depot) with books I've bought because I liked the work or some art history books. Depending on the shelf, I can see how my interests have moved around over time. Most of those books are used to start with, but I've bought some at the museums I visited. A favorite that I bought at the Met was from a show I got to see (over a couple of days, it was so good) - Manet/Velasquez The French Taste for Spanish Painting. Not just about those two artists but about rooms full of both French and Spanish paintings, many painters, where you could walk around and see all the connections..

You can guess I'm an art museum fan. A great show I liked was the Caravaggio show at the Barberini Palace. Oh, gee.....
OK, enough nostalgia.
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farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 09:10 pm
@roger,
I used to call Helen Frankenthalers work as "left over hoagie (sammich) wrappers " They were always stained with grease because she would paint directly on unprimed canvases as her schtick.
(IM GONNA DO ALL MY PAINTINGS ON OLD REFRIGERATOR DOORS)
the caps in my above phrase are my way of showing you, my public, that Ive just had another brilliant history changing idea.

BUT, after several shows that I schlepped up to NEW YAWK to see Ms Frankenthaler and Ms Louise Nevelsen's work and I became a fan.

Lately Ive become an appreciator of the works of big time street painters like Kent Twitchell who create the masterpieces of spray can art on sides of buildings in small towns. Hes great.

Art evolves like anything else. I love the sound of a Strad cello, but Im also nuts about listening to computer enhanced dobro guitars like Jerry Douglas plays. We just gotta try to catch a few displays or concerts(or listen to some college station that plays all kinds from Baroque to rap)

Course I may be rong but what the hell?


farmerman
 
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Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 09:18 pm
@farmerman,
heres a Kent Twitchell mural on some guys house. I have no idea how Twitchell gets paid, nor whether he even asked the guy
"Hey, Ok If I paint a huge picture of Steve McQueen on your curbside wall?"

   https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTq5SD5VDBlm4IPSVpK7qF8hkECFzX-l6ZRrdAzVTg-7REHUzSOAA
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ossobuco
 
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Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 09:28 pm
@farmerman,
I think I remember a Twitchell in LA.. would have to look it up.
ossobuco
 
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Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 09:36 pm
@ossobuco,
And here she is, the freeway lady -

https://www.imagejournal.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/4-Freeway-Lady--300x203.jpg

I forgot that she was holding my grandmother's crocheted blanky.. well, similar.
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