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Translation of Latin lines from 1565 book

 
 
Reply Fri 18 Mar, 2016 10:06 am
I'm hoping someone can help me form a good translation of the following lines from Abraham Hartwell's 1565 "Regina Literata". The passage appears after a brief plot summary (in Latin) of Plautus's "Aulularia", which was staged for Queen Elizabeth at Cambridge in 1564. Some of the Latin transcribed here may be a bit imprecise because Hartwell's book is not terribly well printed. Thanks!

Poster a lux candente rubens surgebat Eoo,
Solque volaturis froena relaxat equis.
Docta simul pubes aequat cum luce labores,
Iamque, ad opus Musas irrequieta vocat.
Perquiritque scholas, sileantne, angarriatintus,
Musarum stat magna domus: lapisundique coctus,
Sublimis muro quadrifidusque decor.
Intus quinque scholae, dextraque in parte sacellum,
Excellensque loci bibliotheca decus.
Hic latio quaecuncque sono, quaecunque, Pelasgo,
Quaecunque ignotis Musa locut a modis,
Hic habitat quicquid doctus sundaverit orbis,
Quiquid ad incudemtepus et hora tulit.
Rex princepsque loci Stagirita sed oemnlus illi
Magnus saepe Plato bella cruent amiuct.
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George
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Mar, 2016 02:40 pm
@MatteoPangallo,
I'm working on it.

I can't promise much, but I'll give it a shot.
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George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 21 Mar, 2016 11:31 am
Here is my very crude translation. Some of the author's constructions
puzzle me, but I've given as close to a literal translation as I can. I think
it is enough to give you an idea of what he was saying.

I found another rendition of this online and so was able to make some
corrections to your original post.

Postera lux candente rubens surgebat Eoo,
After blushing light rose from the shining morning star

Solque volaturis fraena relaxat equis.

the sun loosens the reins of horses about to fly.

Docta simul pubes aequat cum luce labores,
At the same time the learned woman (Elizabeth?) makes grown-up labors equal with light,

Iamque, ad opus Musas irrequieta vocat.
And now, restless, she calls the Muses to work.

Perquiritque scholas, sileantne, an garriat intus,
She makes diligent search for schools, are they silent, or does one chatter within,

Musarum stat magna domus: lapisundique coctus,
The great home of the Muses stands: hardened stone on all sides

Sublimis muro quadrifidusque decor.
Lofty four-part beauty of the wall.

Intus quinque scholae, dextraque in parte sacellum,
Within are five schools, and a little sanctuary on the right side,

Excellensque loci bibliotheca decus.
and an outstanding beautiful library.

Hic Latio quaecuncque sono, quaecunque Pelasgo,
Here the Muse spoken of has brought whatever things are from Latium
(Rome), whatever from Pelasgus (Greece),

Quaecunque ignotis Musa locuta modis,
whatever are of unknown kind.

Hic habitat quicquid doctus sudaverit orbis,
Here resides whatever of the world the learned man has labored hard for (sweat),

Quicquid ad incudem tempus et hora tulit
.
whatever to the anvil time and hour has brought.

Rex princepsque loci Stagirita sed aemulus illi

The king and prince of the place is the Stagirite (Aristotle) but his rival

Magnus saepe Plato bella cruenta movet.

the great Plato often moves bloody wars.


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