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NO WAY, EH?

 
 
Setanta
 
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:05 am
Those who have spent any time in Canadia know that the Canajuns are polite, considerate, friendly, helpful, outgoing, astute, thoughful . . . in short, truly a wonderful people.


So, like . . . they can't possibly be cool, right?
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Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:12 am
Of the two Canadians I've met face to face in my life, one was high and the other one a quiet girl on her way to the Rila monastery. I consider the first one to be cool; the only one criticising her though was an American girl. She thought her not to be cool ('Just look at her. She can't even wake up without a good joint').

I'm not really of a help am I?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:26 am
(Psssst . . . i'm tryin' to get a rise outta the Canajuns, Boss . . . )
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Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:28 am
Je comprends ...
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:30 am
(Careful, Boss, them Canajuns speak froggy-talk, too . . . )
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Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:31 am
Aren't you Canajun (I thought they lived in Louisiana? Oh well) yourself Setanta?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:52 am
As i post, i am in Canadia . . . but i am a native born 'Merican . . . Louisiana was originally settled by the French, and the city of Nouvelle Orleans was founded by d'Iberville. After the English overran Acadia in the French and Indian War (Seven Years War in Europe) the Acadians were shipped out, as being potential insurgents. They were sent to Louisiana (which is a long way from Canada). Cajun, as they call themselves, is a corruption of Accadiens.
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Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:59 am
Right, Cajuns. That are the people I'm talking about. Shipped from Arcadia huh? That's nowadays New Brunswick, not?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 09:05 am
New Brunswick and Nova Scotia . . . contrary to popular belief among the Canajuns, Nova Scotia was not named after a bank . . .

(inside joke for Canajuns)

Edit: It's not Arcadia, it's Accadia . . . named after Akkadia, the first semitic empire in the valley of the Tigris-Euphrates.
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Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 09:18 am
Archadia was New Brunswick Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Most of the Archadians came from Nova Scotia. New Brunswick still has a large French speaking minority but the use of the language in every day speech is declining. Not all French colonists were sent to Louisiana. A number were sent to New England where they were parcelled among various towns in Connecticut and Massachusetts. They are mostly anonymous in the historical record but you occasionally come across hints of their presence. There is a stone house in New London connecticut built in the mid 18th century in a French Canadian style. The death register for Woodstock Connecticut records in the 1790's the death of "the old French Women". Who she was no one knows.
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Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 02:14 pm
Setanta wrote:
(Psssst . . . i'm tryin' to get a rise outta the Canajuns, Boss . . . )


then try this
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 04:27 pm
Good one, eh?


I'll keep that in reserve . . .
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InTraNsiTiOn
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 05:05 pm
Y'all come back now ya hear!
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Aug, 2004 08:15 am
Ah, I hate it when poets are inaccurate. I had thought that Grand Pre was called Acadia after the ancient name of Troy, and from hence came Cajuns.

http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~jay/pages/docs/story.html

Don't care! Still love Evangeline, imperfections and all.
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Bazooey
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Aug, 2004 04:34 pm
Setanta wrote:
After the English overran Acadia in the French and Indian War (Seven Years War in Europe) the Acadians were shipped out, as being potential insurgents. They were sent to Louisiana (which is a long way from Canada). Cajun, as they call themselves, is a corruption of Accadiens.


That's not what happened at all. Nova Scotia, including Acadia, was disputed territory for years before the matter was finally settled in 1713 when the French ceded the mainland to the British once and for all. After that, the Acadians were British subjects, though the British allowed them to retain the Catholic religion, and even to have priests appointed to them by the bishop on St. Jean Island (then French; today, Prince Edward Island). These priests threatned their parishoners with Indian attacks if they didn't toe the French line, to the point that the British government at one point threatened to kick out the French-appointed priests and actually go to the Pope in Rome to have him appoint impartial priests!

When difficulties again arose in the 1750s, the British administration required of the Acadians that they reaffirm their allegience to the British Crown. They would not be required to fight on behalf of the British against the French. They would only be required not to aid the French in any substantive way. The descendents of those who agreed to these terms still live in Nova Scotia today, and still maintain a French-speaking culture there. Those who didn't... well, theirs live in Lousianna and speak English ridiculed by the rest of their countrymen. Good choice, fellahs.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Aug, 2004 05:18 pm
Hey, Bazooey, Welcome to A2K. Can't resist:





Goodbye Joe me gotta go me oh my oh
Me gotta go pole the pirogue down the bayou
My Yvonne the sweetest one me oh my oh
Son of a gun we'll have big fun on the bayou
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie and fillet gumbo
Cause tonight I'm gonna see my ma cher amio
Pick guitar fill fruit jar and be gay-o
Son of a gun we'll have big fun on the bayou
[ fiddle ]
Thibodaux Fontaineaux the place is buzzin'
Kinfolk come to see Yvonne by the dozen
Dress in style and go hog wild me oh my oh
Son of a gun we'll have big fun on the bayou
Settle down far from town get me a pirogue
And I'll catch all the fish in the bayou
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie...
[ fiddle ]
Later on, swap my mon, get me a pirogue
and I'll catch all the fish on the bayou
Swap my mon, to buy Yvonne what she need-oh
Son of a gun we'll have big fun on the bayou


The late, great Hank Williams
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Aug, 2004 05:28 pm
Letty, pulling out the old old country. And you the lady jazz singer and all...




Is it just me, or did the pre-beard Willie Nelson write all his songs to be sung by women? I mean, not just the ones that Patsy sang, but all of them.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Aug, 2004 06:47 pm
patio, Yes, the lady day of another way. I have learned that all..and I mean all sing in the shower of rain, and dew, and light and mountains..Too bad that James Dickey made the cajuns a perverted bunch..and of all things, he was originally a poet.

Goodnight,
From Florida.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Aug, 2004 05:38 pm
Bazooey wrote:
That's not what happened at all. Nova Scotia, including Acadia, was disputed territory for years before the matter was finally settled in 1713 when the French ceded the mainland to the British once and for all.


You need to read further--your "once and for all" is chimerical. The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, concluded October 18, 1748, ending the War of the Austrian Succession, returned to France the fortress of Louisbourg, Isle Royale (Cape Breton Island), and Nova Scotia. The English kept Halifax and Annapolis, and there certainly was constant strife thereafter as a result. I had simplified the narrative because the specific articles of the Treaties of Utrecht (1713) and of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748) are not likely to interest anyone. This thread was started to get a rise out of my Canajuns friends, and not to teach history. If you're going to try to call someone on this kind of thing, you need to make sure you haven't oversimplified matters yourself. I put this thread in the "North America" category, rather than the "History" category because it's not about history.

Anyone interested in a lively and interesting read about the French and Indian War, which is sufficiently accurate for the non-specialist, i recommend Francis Parkman's Montcalm and Wolfe: The French and Indian War. In that work, Parkman gives very specific information on the "insurgency" by the franco-phone residents of Adadie, whether they lived in English territory, or territory which has been returned to France. My brief statement was only designed to point out that the Cajuns arrived in Louisiana as a result of the final settlement which occurred after Wolfe's troops took Québec (he was dead, wounded for the third time as he advanced with his infantry line, he died before the Franco-Canadian line broke. Montcalm was shot through both lungs while trying to manage his horse in the flood of fugitives running for the city gates of Québec; he died about midnight, and the Ursuline Sisters who had been caring for him had him buried under the paving stones of the Cathedral so that his remains would not be descrated in the event the city fell to the English, which is what occurred the next day. St. Foy attempted a winter campaign to recapture the city, and conducted it very well, but his troops lost their nerve when the Brit defenders sortied against them and caught them unaware. Thereafter, no chance remained to dislodge the nearly-starving defenders of the city before the ice broke up in the river and the Royal Navy arrived to reinforce and resupply them.

Another fascinating book is Simon Schamas Dead Certainties: Unwarranted Speculations. In it Schama suggests that Wolfe had committed "suicide by combat" because he was despondant and thought he would lose. That's not unreasonable, as, by all reasonable chances, the assault should have been easily dealt with. From there Schama compares the mythic painting The Death of Wolfe by Benjamin West, for which he became quite renowned . . .

http://www.artunframed.com/images/west/west4.jpg

with the Edward Penny's Death of Wolfe, which is probably closer to the truth of the event, although both were of course speculative (sorry, i could not find a color-version of Penny's painting, simply this engraving taken from the painting) . . .

http://www.mdarchives.state.md.us/ecp/10/214/images/00110001.gif

Finally, Schama moves on to the murder of Charles Parkman (an uncle, i believe, although i don't recall for certain, of the Francis Parkman whose book i have recommended above--which was of course, part of Schama's train of thought with this book) in Boston in 1849. Fascinating mind that man has, and he's a hell of a good writer, as well.
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Aug, 2004 05:48 pm
If Quebec does secede, will this not cut the commute time between Halifax and Toronto considerably?
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