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Does anybody recognize this Italian-Spanish hand colored print?? Any info would be appreciated!

 
 
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2016 04:31 pm
I have a hand colored print that is titled "La Santa Scala". There is some more writing around the title as seen. Could anyone give me any information on this piece (who the print maker is, its approximate worth etc)? The image area of the print is 7" x 5". Any information would be greatly appreciated!

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d67/maxarli87/IMG_1171_zpslnlwpvem.jpg
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d67/maxarli87/IMG_1177_zpsc7inouh2.jpg
 
jespah
 
  3  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2016 05:07 pm
You have some really lovely pieces. Maybe slow down on posting about them, and give people a chance to respond? I really can't do much other than to bump your topic, but I did want to point out a lot of this art is really pretty, no matter who painted it.
maxarli87
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2016 07:19 pm
@jespah,
Thank you! Sorry I am new to the forum I didn't want to overwhelm or annoy anybody Smile
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2016 07:32 pm
@maxarli87,
Oh, you're doing fine - just trying to make it more likely for you to get a response. Where did you get some of these? Are they from garage sales or estate sales or the like? I know people will ask questions like that.

PS Welcome. Smile
maxarli87
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2016 07:53 pm
@jespah,
These all came from a Manhattan estate. I got them at an auction outside New York. I bought them because I really liked the way they look, but unfortunately, I know nothing about them...
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2016 08:18 pm
@maxarli87,
I think you need to ask at the local art gallery.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2016 08:55 pm
@maxarli87,
the handwritten note on this one is funny

the scribe seems to have confused Rome and Jerusalem

___

did the estate sale vendor not provide provenance for you?
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2016 07:38 am
This is the type of souvenir that a person might get doing the "Grand Tour" in the 1890's. It may have been colored by the collector. These make nice decorator pieces but are common and seldom make more than a hundred dollars. This has been kept stored well - no foxing, mildew or damage and the colors are very nice. The commentary written on the bottom adds charm and value for some.
maxarli87
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2016 04:13 pm
@ehBeth,
I know I thought it was pretty funny as well! No they did not unfortunately
0 Replies
 
maxarli87
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2016 04:14 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
Thank you very much for the information. I was so confused about it, reading the commentary and everything. You have helped me shed some light. Thanks again Smile
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2016 05:14 pm
@cicerone imposter,
As a two time art gallery owner, I would not trust me re all of art history, much as I like it and know a fair amount.


Why would you recommend a local art gallery to tell you what to think?

Read/look.


maxarli87
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2016 10:30 am
@ossobuco,
Do you think it's worth it for me to do that with this piece? There are no galleries around where I live, but if with your experience, you think that I should get it looked at, I will find one to go to. Thank you!
maxarli87
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2016 10:31 am
@ossobuco,
Oh never mind I see now that you were saying not to go to an art gallery, and that you were talking to cicerone imposter. Sorry I am new to this forum
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2016 10:55 am
@ehBeth,
The Scala Sancta (English: Holy Stairs, Italian: Scala Santa) are a set of 28 white marble steps located within a building in Rome near the Lateran Basilica

According to the Catholic tradition, they are the steps leading up to the praetorium of Pontius Pilate in Jerusalem on which Jesus Christ stepped on his way to trial during the events known as the Passion.[2] The stairs were, reputedly, brought to Rome by St. Helena in the fourth century. For centuries, the Scala Sancta has attracted Christian pilgrims who wish to honor the Passion of Jesus.

Medieval legends claim that the Holy Stairs were brought from Jerusalem to Rome about 326 by St. Helena, mother of Constantine the Great. In the Middle Ages, they were known as Scala Pilati or "Stairs of Pilate". From old plans it appears that they led to a corridor of the Lateran Palace, near the Chapel of St. Sylvester, and were covered with a special roof. In 1589, Sixtus V had the papal palace, then in ruins, demolished to make way for the construction of a new one, he ordered the Holy Stairs be reconstructed in their present location, before the Sancta Sanctorum (Holy of Holies), named for the many precious relics preserved there, including the celebrated icon of Santissimi Salvatore Acheiropoieton ("not made by human hands") which on certain occasions used to be carried through Rome in procession. These holy treasures, which since Leo X (1513–21) had not been seen by anybody, have been the object of dissertations by Grisar and Lauer.[when?]
The Scala Sancta are encased in protective wood and may only be ascended on the knees. For common use, the staircase is flanked by four additional staircases, two on each side, constructed around 1589.[5] Climbing the Holy Stairs on one's knees is a devotion much in favor with pilgrims and the faithful. Several popes have performed the devotion.[2] As part of the ceremonies opening the Holy Year in 1933, Cardinal Francesco Marchetti Selvaggiani, Vicar of Rome, led a crowd of hundreds in mounting the steps on their
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2016 11:18 am
@maxarli87,
A serious art appraisal by a knowledgeable art appraiser costs money. One fellow here, farmerman, may know the present rates for a good appraiser, and so may bobsal.

I started looking up about art appraisals and ran across this link:
http://www.artbusiness.com/freeapp.html

It is actually a cautionary link about watching out regarding free appraisals.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2016 12:07 pm
@ossobuco,
Actually, you still can buy such/similar 'handcoloured' prints there (at least you could, when I'd been there a couple of years ago).
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2016 08:06 am
@maxarli87,
No. Take it to a collectibles/antique shop.
maxarli87
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Feb, 2016 10:52 am
@bobsal u1553115,
Thank you!
0 Replies
 
momoends
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Mar, 2016 02:48 am
@ehBeth,
why?
0 Replies
 
momoends
 
  2  
Reply Sat 5 Mar, 2016 02:58 am
@maxarli87,
the sacred stairs- marble made of, it´s place in front of la basilica de san juan. Constantino I´s mother orderer for the marble stair to be brought from poncio pilatos palace in jerusalem to rome, cause it´s supposed to be the one jesus climb to be judge
 

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