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Bernie Sanders Single-Payer Healthcare plan

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jan, 2016 07:13 pm
@ossobuco,
I'm routinely kidding or poiking.

I'm very intersested in actual health plans.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jan, 2016 07:22 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Can't argue with success.
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jan, 2016 09:36 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
wanna go out for ice cream? (inside a warm store, of course)

lets get it delivered
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Jan, 2016 09:46 pm
http://www.occupydemocrats.com/watch-2009-video-shows-bill-clinton-defending-bernies-single-payer-healthcare-plan/
This is a video of Bill Clinton in 2009 speaking out for the type of health plan Sanders is pushing for.
blatham
 
  3  
Reply Mon 25 Jan, 2016 10:00 pm
From Jon Chait
Quote:
Obama in 2008 believed Republicans could be reasoned out of their irrationality. Sanders today believes they can be swept aside when the people rise up and depose their corporate paymasters. Clinton, then as now, promises to grind away at them in a trench war that has gone on for decades and for which there is no end in sight.
http://nym.ag/1TkK5II
That's pretty much the way I see things.

cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jan, 2016 12:39 am
@blatham,
Ditto.
0 Replies
 
RABEL222
 
  4  
Reply Tue 26 Jan, 2016 01:27 am
@edgarblythe,
Dropping the single pay option is the only way Obama could get all the democrats to vote for it. He had to have them all because the republicans would have commited hari kari before they would have voted for it. And as noted 20 million people have insurance that wouldent have if it dident pass. Perfect, hell no, but if we ever get intelligent enough to vote a democratic congress and president it can be fixed. But not for at least 8 years. If Bernie is president nothing is going to happen because even some of the democrats will vote against socialist ideas. I dont think his ideas are that bad but he will be one of the most ineffective presidents ever elected. No republican will support him and Ill bet more democratic congressmen than you realize will be against him too.
0 Replies
 
RABEL222
 
  3  
Reply Tue 26 Jan, 2016 01:52 am
I was reading a science magizine, yes I can read, I just cant spell, about billion dollar business that take medical information from doctor offices and hospitals, corralate it and sell it to insurance, and pharcitical co. They were taken to court because they were accessing personal information without anyones permission. It went to the Supreme Court who ruled in the information gathers favor. Guess how the court decided the case. It infringed on the businesses right of free speech. Let us elect another republican president and maybe they'll make governance simple by ruling one cant vote if they dont have a billion dollars in the bank.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  0  
Reply Tue 26 Jan, 2016 05:16 am
@edgarblythe,
She and the rest of the Democrats and Republicans are being paid too pretty by Big Pharma to support Bernie's single payer now. We have been sold out and I'm afraid to go to the doctor even though I'm paying insurance premiums.

0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jan, 2016 03:26 pm
@roger,
Some possible counterarguments I have mulled over are that there may be intrinsic things about America that are distinct from our healthcare systems that inflate the costs.

And there certainly are some systemic issues I can see that do. For one, Americans are not as healthy on average as the other countries I am comparing it to and beyond that the more litigious culture also contributes to the costs.

I don't think they do enough so to explain the sizable gap in per-capita spending but do think that even with similar health systems we are likely to continue to pay more for healthcare than other similar countries due to cultural differences like this.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jan, 2016 03:30 pm
@blatham,
Thank you, you are too kind. When I read my posts the majority sound like a disjointed, repetitive stream of consciousness and I often regret the haste in my replies.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jan, 2016 03:35 pm
@Robert Gentel,
One thing I realized when recalling these events later last night was that the Democratic congress as a closing window was something I gave short shrift.

I still think I would have gone with a single-payer approach but better appreciate some of the reasoning behind the rush to swing for the fences with that crucial context in mind.
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jan, 2016 04:00 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Quote:
the Democratic congress as a closing window

That's a good point.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2019 10:19 am
The state of healthcare in America.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-canada-health-insulin-idUSKCN1TU0T4
Excerpt:
American caravan arrives in Canadian 'birthplace of insulin' for cheaper medicine
Tyler Choi
TORONTO (Reuters) - A self-declared “caravan” of Americans bused across the Canada-U.S. border on Saturday, seeking affordable prices for insulin and raising awareness of “the insulin price crisis” in the United States.


The group called Caravan to Canada started the journey from Minneapolis, Minnesota on Friday, and stopped at London, Ontario on Saturday, to purchase life-saving type 1 diabetes medication at a pharmacy.

The caravan numbers at approximately 20 people, according to Nicole Smith-Holt, a member of the group. Smith-Holt said her 26-year-old son died in June 2017 because he was forced to ration insulin due to the high cost. This is Smith-Holt’s second time on the caravan.

cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2019 10:49 am
@Lash,
Sad, isn't it. Americans having to go to Canada to purchase insulin. There is something dramatically wrong with drug prices in this country; the government needs to get involved, to stop the greed of Pharma companies.
Lash
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2019 12:07 pm
@cicerone imposter,
It seems like someone should be criminally liable for people dying due to these prices. There’s no accountability in this country.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2019 12:51 pm
@Lash,
I totally agree; we just have to hope things will change with the change in administration from republican to democrat in future elections. I just don't understand why people continue to vote for republicans when they work to destroy our health care. From Forbes:
Quote:
Make no mistake, the Trump budget is hardly senior-friendly. He’d freeze or reduce spending for many federal senior service programs—continuing a trend that has gone on for more than a decade. And his proposed cuts to Medicaid could hurt family caregivers of parents or younger relatives with disabilities. But the Medicare cuts? There is much less there than meets the eye.

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget does a nice job walking through the math, and concludes that the net reduction in Medicare spending would be between $515 billion and $575 billion, not $845 billion. The White House projects that total Medicare spending over the next decade will top $10 trillion.
0 Replies
 
Baldimo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2019 04:17 pm
@cicerone imposter,
The govt is involved, that's part of the problem. Patent laws dealing with insulin are one of the major problems. Like other drugs, there are no generics because of how the companies have worked with Congress and the FDA to manipulate the patent laws and regulations around these types of medications. You can't purchase the older types of insulin, they force people to stick with the newer versions due to "safety" concerns with the older versions. They were safe enough until a generic could be made, now they are unsafe...

https://www.statnews.com/2018/12/07/patent-abuse-rising-drug-prices-lantus/
Quote:
The company — which along with Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk control nearly the entire U.S. insulin market — has further prevented insulin competition in America by pursuing litigation against two companies that want to offer cheaper biosimilars. (Biosimilars are the generic-like equivalents for complex molecules such as insulin and other biologic drugs.) Like overpatenting, this tactic works against the millions of Americans who must take insulin.
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Jul, 2019 05:01 pm
@Baldimo,
Baldimo, You're missing the big picture. There's nothing wrong with universal health care; most developed countries provide it. We can learn the pros and cons of the best and worst systems available, and make them custom made to fit our country's needs and cost. Our country already spends the most on healthcare. Drug cost are a major handicap in our country; many go to Canada or Mexico to buy the same drug at cheaper prices. US Pharma is gouging American consumers; that has to be corrected.
0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2019 11:53 am
What’s New in Bernie Sanders’ New Medicare for All Plan.


Published April 11, 2019
Quote:
Saying he wants to end the “international embarrassment” of the U.S. being the only wealthy country that doesn’t provide universal health coverage, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) released a new version of his Medicare for All plan Wednesday. The bill’s 14 co-sponsors include Sanders’ fellow presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Cory Booker (D-NJ), Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY).

The revamped health care proposal is similar to the plan Sanders released in 2017, though it adds a long-term care benefit for Americans with disabilities. Overall, the bill would transform the $3.5 trillion health U.S. care system by replacing private health insurance with a single-payer system that covers primary and preventive care, hospital stays, mental health, dental and vision services, and prescription drugs for all Americans.

“It is not a radical idea to say that in the United States, every American who goes to a doctor should be able to afford the prescription drug he or she needs,” Sanders said. “If every major country on earth can guarantee health care to all and achieve better health outcomes, while spending substantially less per capita than we do, it is absurd for anyone to suggest that the United States of America cannot do the same.”

Vox’s Sarah Kliff said Sanders’ plan “includes an exceptionally generous benefit package” compared the country’s peers, including Canada, which does not cover vision, dental or prescription drugs.

Here are some key features of Sanders’ plan:

Medicare for All would be phased in over four years, with the qualifying age falling by a decade each year.

In the interim, Americans would be given the option to buy into a publicly run health care program.

The Indian Health Service and the Department of Veterans Affairs would remain independent for at least 10 years.

There would be no premiums, deductibles or co-pays for health services, excluding prescriptions drugs.

Enrollees would face a $200 maximum co-pay for prescription drugs annually.

Medicare would be required to negotiate drug prices and create a drug formulary listing the medications that may be prescribed.

Providers would be paid under the existing Medicare fee schedule.

The program would be part of a new Universal Medicare Agency within the Health and Human Services Department.

Private insurers could provide only benefits not covered by the government, such as elective surgery.

Sanders left the big question – how to pay for his proposal – largely unanswered, although he did provide a list of suggestions, including a 4% tax on employees (exempting the first $29,000 in income for a family of four), a 7.5% tax on employers (exempting the first $2 million in payroll) and a new tax on “extreme wealth.”

The Trump campaign criticized the plan as a “government takeover of health care” and said that “free market policies” would be a better alternative. “So-called ‘Medicare for All’ means private insurance for none, kicking 180 million Americans off of their current plans,” said Kayleigh McEnany, spokeswoman for Trump’s re-election campaign. “‘Medicare for all’ is a euphemism for government takeover of healthcare, and it would increase wait times, eliminate choice, and raise taxes.”

The bottom line: The 2020 presidential election could turn on the question of health care, and with another iteration of his Medicare-for-All plan, Sanders has underscored his position as the leading progressive in the race for the Democratic nomination. The details of the plan may matter less than the simple fact that the two main U.S. political parties will likely offer voters a clear alternative on this defining issue.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/whats-new-in-bernie-sanders-new-medicare-for-all-plan/ar-BBVOMMn?ocid=UE13DHP
0 Replies
 
 

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