14
   

Would I be confessing to a crime..

 
 
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 09:49 pm
if I posted about something that is legal in my state but still violates federal law?

Like, what if I said "I bought legal weed today."

Would I be confessing to a crime?
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 09:51 pm
@boomerang,
From the Feds' point of view, I think so. They could use that as evidence against you, if they had a mind to track you down.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 09:53 pm
@FBM,
That's what I'm thinking, too....
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:04 pm
Before same sex marriage was legal all over was it a crime when a couple announced their marriage on social media?

FBM
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:08 pm
@boomerang,
No, but making the announcement wasn't the crime. Getting married was the crime, and would have only applied in those states where it was still illegal. The announcement could be used as evidence in such a state.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:08 pm
My state allows physician assisted suicide.

If I were a doctor who advertised in Idaho that I could help patients die, would I be a criminal?
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:08 pm
@FBM,
Yes, but there have been signals from the feds that they will not do so and will for the most part respect the states here.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:09 pm
@FBM,
Right. I get that the announcement isn't a crime.

Would they be confessing to a crime?
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:10 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:

My state allows physician assisted suicide.

If I were a doctor who advertised in Idaho that I could help patients die, would I be a criminal?


I think that would depend on the specific wording of the laws of each state. Again, the advertising/announcing is a separate act from the deed itself.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:11 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:

Yes, but there have been signals from the feds that they will not do so and will for the most part respect the state's here.


Yeah, that's what I understand, too. I don't think there's much chance of getting hunted down by the Feds over such an announcement.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:12 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:

Right. I get that the announcement isn't a crime.

Would they be confessing to a crime?


Yeah, that's what I meant by the Feds being able to use it as evidence against you.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 10:59 pm
@boomerang,
You might be confessing, but I'm almost certain the statement couldn't be used as evidence.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 11:06 pm
@roger,
Really? Why not? I've read of people talking about crimes on FB and then getting busted because of it. Could be urban legends or something.

Edit:

Can't testify (ha!) about its accuracy, but I found this...

Quote:
What people say on social media “can be held against them in court,” according to the Social Media Law and Criminal Offenses.


https://www.rt.com/uk/232715-wales-uk-criminal-facebook/
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 11:30 pm
@FBM,
It might be enough to inspire an investigation, but sounds like inadmissible hearsay to me. She could say she was just kidding around and laugh as she walked off. I didn't see anyone recite her first amendment (Miranda) rights.

EDIT: I just saw your own edit. I didn't follow the link but it seems to be a UK source.

FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 11:34 pm
@roger,
The quote I posted was from the UK. I don't know how it would play out in the US. As for Miranda rights, I think that's a separate issue regarding what the suspect says after being arrested. Evidence-gathering is a different part of the investigation, I think. I don't know how a judge determines what's admissible in court.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2015 11:39 pm
@FBM,
Well, I wish she would go ahead and say it, and hopefully get back to us with some good news.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Dec, 2015 12:57 am
@boomerang,
Better stop talking right now, boomer. Laughing
0 Replies
 
manored
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Dec, 2015 02:37 pm
I don't know how American laws work but I'm under the impression that the whole point of state laws is that things may be legal on the state and illegal on the rest of the country (or vice versa), and then its ok to do that thing as long as you limit yourself to the state in question, isn't that it?

If that is correct, then why would posting online about the activity you're allowed to do where you are get you in trouble?
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Sun 20 Dec, 2015 03:23 pm
@FBM,
FBM wrote:

Really? Why not? I've read of people talking about crimes on FB and then getting busted because of it. Could be urban legends or something.

Edit:

Can't testify (ha!) about its accuracy, but I found this...

Quote:
What people say on social media “can be held against them in court,” according to the Social Media Law and Criminal Offenses.


https://www.rt.com/uk/232715-wales-uk-criminal-facebook/


That doesn't apply here.
0 Replies
 
Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Dec, 2015 03:37 pm
When I was a long haired student in 1970 I told a cop who was searching me for drugs that I carried my has in my mouth and had just swallowed it and he laughed and said "You'll have a nice evening then". I later told the story to a pal and he said "You could have been busted for restrospective possession" but I didn't buy that.

 

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