19
   

Anyone hear like blues?

 
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2018 06:11 am
Keb Mo and crew, doin a bluesy version of the Stones with some strong Dixieland Jazz and Cajun Zydeco elements throwed in, eh? All said and done, it, like, ROCKS, eh!"

layman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2018 08:22 pm
@layman,
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2018 08:40 pm
@layman,
Are you familiar with Red Hot Jazz? One of the first streaming sites, back in the mid 90s, with dozens, maybe rhundreds of pre 1940 blues and blues singers and jazz when the lines between them were not as strict as they became since, and all the great jazzmen also backed the great early blues singers on extrmeley rare 78s. I just looked and the site is still there--they used to have everything in I think it was Real Player, not a format that is still active. If you liked that Keb tune, check out Red Hot Jazz.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2018 09:04 pm
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:

Are you familiar with Red Hot Jazz?


Naw, I aint, Jack. Truth be told I usually stay away from anything they call "jazz"---it just aint my thang.

I do like the old-timey Dixieland kinda jazz, though:

layman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2018 09:20 pm
@layman,
Honky Tonk Women was a Stones classic, sho nuff. Straight-up blues/rock. But sometimes I think I like their country version ("Country Honk") even more better. The fiddle ROCKS!

0 Replies
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2018 09:25 pm
Now that I done started in on the Stones, I figured I throw their cover of Robert Johnson's great tune.


0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2018 09:56 pm
Country Honk is fine, a lousy mix but that's kinda what you
re likely to get in what sounds like a live on the street recording.

AS I said, the lines between jazz and blues weren't there before WWII. The arly blues singers all recorded with early jazz musicians in their backing bands. Guitars were often there, biut they weren't usually the lead insturment except in back country juke joints, because they weren't LOUD before electricity, and a lot of the music they played was really Saturday night dance music. Jazz and blues had the same roots and went side by side and bacK a nd forth for decades, until roughly WWII>. I'm not a big fan on pooxtwar WWII MYSELF, a lot of the early bluses is jazzy or the jazz is bluesy. Listen to it.

Kid Ory had the kgood fortune to survive into the modern recording era, but I think he was in whe WWI early jazz vlues tradition and might vey well have backed up blues singers in the 78 era. Don't know if he did, but they weoiuld have had natural affinhities.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jan, 2018 10:28 pm
Sister Rosetta. This tune has elements of gospel, blues, jazz, and incipient rock and roll, which she more or less pioneered, eh?

0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2018 04:05 pm
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Jan, 2018 12:41 am
@layman,
Leadbelly:

0 Replies
 
layman
 
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Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2018 03:12 am
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2018 03:47 am
This documentary is, in my opinion, well done and quite informative from a historical perspective, not only of the Peidmont blues, but of the early 20th century in general. It's about an hour long, but worth the time if you're interested in this kinda ****.

0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2018 11:33 pm
Back in the day, before the women got involved and ruined the whole group, Fleetwood Mac was perhaps the best limey white boy band doin authentic blues, without trying to make it into something it aint. Here they here with a faithful rendition of an old Elmore James tune.


0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 12:39 am
A little swamp harp from good ole Lazy Lester, eh?


layman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 12:50 am
@layman,
If one Lester tune is good, then two gotta be more better, eh?

This one has a touch of zydeco feel to it.
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 11:21 am
@layman,
layman wrote:

This one has a touch of zydeco feel to it.


One reason I say that is because the harp seems to pretty much mimic an accordian, ya know?
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 07:30 pm
After serving for many decades as a mecca for blues street singers (including Muddy Waters, Little Walter, Robert Nighthawk, and many others) and every other kind of hustler, Maxwell Street, on the southwest side of Chicago, has disappeared. Destroyed by "urban renewal" ya know. Usurped by the University of Chicago, and ****.

Here's about what it looked like, with John Lee Hooker, when last seen:

layman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 07:39 pm
@layman,
And here's what it looked like, along with other parts of the South Side, 30-40 years before that (with Robert Johnson singin and playin his classic tune):


layman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 4 Feb, 2018 07:45 pm
@layman,
And in between, with Robert Nighthawk:

MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Feb, 2018 01:18 pm
@layman,
I think I like the really early blues roots, the earliest blues recordeings we have, which are anyway at least a generation after the blues got their start, more than you do, but if you feel like digging into them I found a treasure trove of mp3s of stuff from the 20s and 30s, juneberry78s.com. You can listen to it online or download the mp3s. If it's to your taste, it's gold. Check out the gospel too, since blues singers recorded gospel too, and the vocal techniques come from thee same trditions. Great National Steel slide by Blind James somebody in the Gospel section.
 

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