15
   

Anyone hear like blues?

 
 
layman
 
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 12:42 am
Like Robert Johnson, Howlin Wolf, Muddy Waters, and those old guys? Or good ole:



Elmore James?
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 12:43 am
Is that a pun in your title?
layman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 12:48 am
@Lordyaswas,
Quote:
Is that a pun in your title?


Yes, and no. It was just typo, to begin with. I spotted it as soon as I saw it in print. I was gunna change it, but, even before I saw your post, Lawdy, it occurred to me that I could just leave it be, and let people see it as a pun. Then I saw your post. Done made up my mind--I'm just gunna leave it be.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 12:57 am
@layman,
That's what call the blues, not the stuff they peddle today as rhythm and blues. I have some John Lee Hooker as well as several of the artists you mentioned. I need to organize my music so I can find things more easily.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:00 am
@glitterbag,
Quote:
I have some John Lee Hooker as well as several of the artists you mentioned.


John Lee ROCKS!

Boogie, Chillin!

layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:14 am
@glitterbag,
John Lee on good ole (now gone) Maxwell Street, Chicago, Illinois, USA:

0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:19 am
@layman,
If you're serious about the blues, then it might be of interest to you to read the Keith Richards Autobiography, and look out for the Rolling Stones Documentary "Crossfire Hurricane".

America (certainly most of white America) was paying little or no attention to their blues heritage until The Stones and other British bands started to copy it and promote it out there in the early 60's.

The Stones were asked to go on one of your mainstream kids music programmes, and said they would on condition that they brought Howlin' Wolf with them.
The producers had no idea who or what that was, and agreed. The Stones did their jumping about stuff and the kids screamed, then Howlin' Wolf went on and the place went wild.
That was seen as the rebirth of US blues music, and it hasn't done so bad in the years that followed.

One thing you have to remember is that when the likes of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were all in their early teens and learning their trade, they were massively inspired by black music from the USA.
There was no distinction between black and white over here in the UK when it came to "hip" music, and if someone was fortunate enough to get their hands on an American single, they would take it home and learn how to play it.
This way, from very early on, youngsters in the UK were brought up on not only the rock n roll (Elvis, Buddy and Bill Hayley etc), but also American Blues.

I can't speak for America at that time, and someone will hopefully come along and fill that gap as to what your young were listening to at that moment in music history, but from what I have gathered, it seems (could be wrong) that this type of blues music was deemed solely for black people, and somewhat looked down on by white Americans.

Meanwhile, our boys were learning songs like this, and about to take America by storm.....

Remember, this video is from waaaaay back in 1964.


Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:26 am
Keith Richards at his best.

Blues in Britain.......

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:31 am
Robert Johnson was among the first blues artists to record his music in the United States. His version of Crossroads was recorded, i believe, in 1936. (The sound quality is not good, you will probably need to turn your speakers all the way up.)

layman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:41 am
@Lordyaswas,
Aint had no peace in the barnyard...since my lil red rooster been gone (a Howlin Wolf cover)

Early Stones were quite faithful to the original recordings, as a rule. They NEVER lost their bluesy edge, even when they started writing their own material.

Quote:
America (certainly most of white America) was paying little or no attention to their blues heritage until The Stones and other British bands started to copy it and promote it out there in the early 60's.


Quite true.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:45 am
@Setanta,
I love Robert Johnson! I discovered him after buying the acoustic Stones LP "Stripped", several years ago.

They did a cover of this, and started me on the hunt for his music.




And the Stones version,.....

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:48 am
The Stones did "Love in Vain" on the Let it Bleed album.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 01:59 am
@Setanta,
The Stones covered several (at least) Johnson tunes (not near as many as Clapton has, though), including this classic:

Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 02:05 am
@Setanta,
It never really registered with me until I heard the version on "stripped".

Let it Bleed came out just before or after Sticky Fingers, I think, and we all bought SF at school, purely because of the title and the real zipper novelty on the album cover.
I wasn't really into blues back then, just the general music in the charts,

The acoustic albums seemed to be all the rage for a while in the 90's, and that one was played at full blast in the car for about a year. Drove the better half mad.

glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 02:14 am
@layman,
Don't forget the Canadians, Dan Aykroyd was a big fan because the old blues singers would perform in small clubs in Canada. We have to thank the Brits and the Canucks for reminding Americans that there was a wealth of talent here that was largely overlooked.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 02:16 am
@Lordyaswas,
OMG, do you still have that album, I know I have it. I went a little nuts over the Stones.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 02:17 am
@Lordyaswas,
What about the album with the Stones in Drag, Military drag as well?
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 02:19 am
@glitterbag,
Quote:
Don't forget the Canadians,...


Ronnie Hawkins, and "the hawks" (later "the band" without Hawkins). Mostly hosers (not Levon, though). Covered early blues/rock tunes (Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry) as well as old blues tunes (like Memphis Minnie's "down in the alley)



farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 02:48 pm
@layman,
I like blues and intrumentals. Stuff like Big Bill Broonzy, Ray Charles, Ry Cooder, Taj Mahalnand Stevie Ray Vaughn.

I like the old stuff too but its gotta have some good licks . Heres Broonzy with the washboard and harmonica as accompaniment to his gitar.

edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2015 03:00 pm
Here are a few of my favorites


 

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