23
   

Anyone hear like blues?

 
 
layman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 08:25 pm
The inimitable Texas bluesman, Lightnin Hopkins. This tale is somewhat long (about 7 minutes), but well worth listening to (more than once). It combines self-effacing humor with a good story, and great guitar-playing.

Black Cadillac Blues:

ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 08:32 pm
listening to this tonight

http://music.cbc.ca/#!/Saturday-Night-Blues

tonight's feature interview is with Watermelon Slim

0 Replies
 
layman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 11:53 pm
@layman,
Here's good ole Lightnin again, making (musically) seductive propositions to a very young Joan Baez, who just kinda shyly giggles like a little schoolgirl.

0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 01:57 pm
I was workin on the projects...
beggin the Relief for shoes....
Cause that rock and concrete...
Oooh, well, well, they givin my feet the blues..

Peetie Wheatstraw, the "Devil's Son-in-law" aka William Bunch, was raised in the Delta (Cotton Plant, Arkansas) but moved up to East Saint Louis in the 20's and because a very popular fixture there. Wheatstraw also billed himself, as the "High Sheriff from Hell," and, like Robert Johnson after him, was rumored to have sold his soul to the devil. Extensively recorded in the 30's, he had a wide influence. R.L. Burnside and Bob Hite, singer for Canned Heat, among others, have adopted his trademark injection, "Oooh, well, well..."

argome321
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 02:04 pm
@layman,
How does anyone feel about Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues Featuring
Eric Clapton circa 2003, I think?
layman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 02:16 pm
@argome321,
Scorsese is a very serious blues fan. As I recall his "presents the blues" is a collection of 5 or 6 separate sub-documentaries by done by different producers, each with his own perspective to offer.

Been a while since I've seen it, but very entertaining and informative, I thought. A great service to the blues done by Scorsese. I'm sure Clapton appeared in one or more of these, but I don't think of it as "featuring" Clapton. What are your thoughts, Arg?

argome321
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 04:30 pm
@layman,
Quote:
Scorsese is a very serious blues fan. As I recall his "presents the blues" is a collection of 5 or 6 separate sub-documentaries by done by different producers, each with his own perspective to offer.

Been a while since I've seen it, but very entertaining and informative, I thought. A great service to the blues done by Scorsese. I'm sure Clapton appeared in one or more of these, but I don't think of it as "featuring" Clapton. What are your thoughts, Arg?


yes, I made a VHS copy taken from the PBS airing Eric Clapton, It was a ninety minute. I was so surprised how an English rocker knew so much about the History of American Blues.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtMdTaISq_w
argome321
 
  2  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 04:44 pm
@layman,
My musical tastes are eclectic , from classical to Blues,Rhythm and Soul, to soul, Rock, Jazz, fusion, folk, new age, light jazz, modern jazz, big band etc, Actually, what ever piece of music that hits me.etc.
I grew up surrounded by all types of music and was exposed to all types in school. I think I can say earnestly that I have a deep appreciate for music.

though today, I don't listen to today's music. Smile

0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 06:10 pm
@argome321,


OK, that's a different one, called "Nothing but the Blues." I've seen that too, but mostly forgotten it. Another very nice documentary/anthology video. I thought you were talking about this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYtyNHyzRCY&list=PLCJ2kGrkFDZutXue4k9ubbKRMjnTbHgJN

I don't listen to anything current either.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 06:20 pm
Them Delta Blues...

layman
 
  3  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 06:43 pm
@FBM,
Anyone who likes blues and hasn't seen this would no doubt find it quite entertaining. It's a short film called "Stop Breaking Down" with some surprisingly good actors in it. Son House (the character) narrates, and it features Robert Johnson. Willie Brown is in it. It was done by Glenn Marzano, whoever that is. It's a short chronicle of Johnson's short life.



I've embedded it here, but if you click on the "youtube" icon, you can watch it directly at youtube, and enlarge the picture.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 06:46 pm
@layman,
Thanks. I'll watch it now.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 07:15 pm
@layman,
The volume wouldn't go up enough, so I turned on the captions. They're crap, but sometimes hilariously so. If you want a chuckle, have a gander.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 10:40 am
@Lordyaswas,
That describes me Lordy.
A white kid in the white suburbs.
The first "blues" sounding tune I heard was
" On The Road Again" by Canned Heat, a white blues band that reworked Floyd Jones slow version.

And Goin Up The Country, a reworking of Henry Thomas Bulldoze Blues.
Later on the early Stones albums had covers of some great blues artists.
I eventually found the sources. But it wasn't easy
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 10:45 am
@layman,
Thanks for posting "Red Hot"
I saw Robert Gordon perform it wit Link Wray but never knew it was a Sun record By Billy Lee Riley. With Jerry Lee Lewis on piano no less.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 11:06 am
@panzade,
Quote:
Thanks for posting "Red Hot"...With Jerry Lee Lewis on piano no less.


My pleasure.

The Killer ROCKS!

Thanks for the Jones post--haven't heard that before. He took a few cues from Howlin Wolf (or, perhaps, vice versa, but I doubt it), eh?
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 12:14 pm
@panzade,
Quote:
Thanks for posting "Red Hot"
I saw Robert Gordon perform it wit Link Wray


Turns out, Hawkins, Gordon and Wray aint the onliest guys to cover that tune, eh?:

0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 01:41 pm
@panzade,
Quote:
never knew it was a Sun record By Billy Lee Riley.


People always naturally tend to associate any cover tune with whoever they first heard it from--sometimes even to the point of thinking the original artist "stole" it from the later one.

God only knows how many people think that the Beatles were the first to record the Isley Brother's "Twist and Shout," or that Clapton (Cream) wrote Johnson's "Crossroads" (although there are some who will tell you Elmore James wrote it, too).
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 01:47 pm
Layman, and all, thank you for this really good thread. I'm a long time blues lover but not as knowledgeable as the rest of you re who did what and when. Best thread in a bunch of sundays.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2015 01:58 pm
@ossobuco,
Cool, Osso. Glad you like it. It seems that there are many more here that like blues than I expected.
 

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