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Fruit Pizza

 
 
ehBeth
  Selected Answer
 
  4  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 09:26 pm
@mckenzie,
nah - they really are called fruit pizza

refrigerated cookie pizza dough covered with a mixture of cream cheese and marshmallow fluff and then fruit is the easiest version

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/fruit-pizza-i/

http://www.kraftrecipes.com/recipes/philadelphia-fruit-pizza-57079.aspx

http://sallysbakingaddiction.com/2014/05/23/fruit-pizza/

etc etc etc

http://sallysbakingaddiction.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Easy-Homemade-Fruit-Pizza-by-sallysbakingaddiction.com_.jpg


and a whack of them at the food network

http://www.foodnetwork.com/topics/fruit-pizza-recipes.html
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 09:35 pm
I must have said somewhere something that someone gets their goat.




Please disregard.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 10:11 pm
I guess we're talking about a large, circular pastry that superficially resembles a pizza.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 10:38 pm
But, the grape focaccia I mentioned was real pizza. The dough matters.

The first pizza I tried in Rome was your basic cooked dough that had the mortadella (fatty arbuckle) lose the fat in the heat process, thus discs with emptiness, the emptiness being tasty.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 10:40 pm
@ossobuco,
Calling this fruit disc pizza is public relations foo foo.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  0  
Reply Sat 9 Aug, 2014 03:47 pm
@ehBeth,
Grrrr. Ms. Food Snot doesn't like most of those either.
<Huffs away>
Have to go search for some bacon.
Oh, I mean, pancetta..
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Aug, 2014 09:19 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

I guess we're talking about a large, circular pastry that superficially resembles a pizza.




it appears that a sweet pizza is technically the authentic version



Quote:
Pizza is now a type of bread and tomato dish, often served with cheese. However, until the late nineteenth or early twentieth century, the dish was sweet, not savory, and earlier versions which were savory more resembled the flat breads now known as schiacciata.[19] Pellegrino Artusi's classic early twentieth century cookbook, La Scienza in cucina e l'Arte di mangiar bene gives three recipes for pizza, all of which are sweet.[20]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_pizza
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 12:15 pm
@ehBeth,
Well! I'm not only wrong, but wrong something like seven times.
If a thing is worth doing, eh, it's worth doing well..

I have a book titled Italian Cook Book by Pellegrino Artusi, in translation by Olga Ragusa; 1949. And yep, there are three pizza recipes, two of them sweet. (Pizza comes right after pigeon in the index...) Can't find the third one yet, as it's not on page 102 as asserted, but that one's title is Pizza in Neapolitan Style, so likely not sugary.

I'll type up the sweet recipes as they're interesting - in another later post.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 12:16 pm
@ehBeth,
Good. It's all yours.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 12:52 pm
@ossobuco,

BOOK-LIKE PIZZA
from the book by Artusi in translation

The credit for this fine pizza goes to a lady who willingly offered her knowledge to an eager learner. It is true I had to try at least twice before I mastered the art of preparing it, but I am happy to jot down this recipe for those whose taste is discriminating.

Enough flour to be mixed with 2 eggs, a pinch of salt, and three spoonfuls of cognac, or brandy, is all that is required. Mix all these ingredients and knead the whole into a loaf which is ot too hard; then roll it into a thin foil dough. When this is done, melt 2/3 ounce of butter and smear the foil dough with it. Fold it so as to place the buttered part inside, and make a roll 6 inches wide. Now cut this in half, lengthwise, and then crosswise, so as to obtain several rectangular pieces. Press the back, or the uncut part of each piece and fry in abundant oil or virgin lard. Dash powered* sugar on these pieces and serve. If you succeed in preparing this pizza in the proper form, you will see that it opens up like pages of a book.

This amount is ordinarily enough for four persons..

*book typo


STUFFED PIZZA

The custard filling is made of the following ingredients:

Milk, 1/2 pint
Sugar, 2 oz
Starch, 1 oz.
Two egg yolks
Any flavoring


Add the following to the custard when removing it from the fire:

Whole Pinoli, 1 oz.
Raisins, 2 1/2 oz.


Fill a pie with this compound, as in the preceding recipe.



from Preceding Recipe - AHA, THERE'S THE PIZZA, IN NEAPOLITAN STYLE, and it is sweet..... (it was hiding on page 221)

Sugar, 2 oz.
Flour, less than 1 oz.
Eggs, 1 and 1 yolk
Lemon rind flaoring
Milk, half a glass
Ricotta, 5 ox.
Almonds, sweet and 3 bitter, 2 oz.

Make a custard with the milk, the sugar, the flour and the egg. When it is cooked and still boiling, add the yolk and the flavoring. Then add the ricotta
and the almonds, ground finely. Use crusting No. 341 B.

Mix everything and fill the crusting arranged in the shape of a pie. Gild the upper crust of the pie with an egg yolk, and bake in the oven. Serve cold, sprayed with confectionary sugar.


CRUSTING No. 341 B - next post, I need some coffee first.










ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 01:10 pm
Back to Crust 341 B -

Flour, 9 0z.
Butter, 4 1/2 oz.
White sugar, 3 1/2 oz.
Egg, 1
Egg Yolk, 1


The following is the simplest way to make soft crusting. Grind the sugar finely, mix it with the flour, and soften the butter by working it with a wet hand. Now make a loaf of all the ingredients by using the blade of a large knife in mixing them. Do not work it too much or too long. Whenever possible, it is advisable to prepare this crusting the day before, as time is in its favor, and when baked, it is softer and mealy.

When about to use the crusting for the pastry, flatten it to the desired thickness with a rolling pin. If you wish to give it the appearance of fancy pastry, use the "grooved" rolling pin on the side of the crusting which goes outside in your last touches. The use of powdered sugar in stretching the dough will make it easier to handle. Adding a few drops of white wine or marsala wine to the leavings and mixing them with the main loaf will make the crusting softer.


Got to stop now or I'll copy all the recipes - the next one being cornflour cakes..


So, wiki and Beth were quite right about the three sweet pizza recipes via Artusi.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 06:25 pm
Meantime, the book I dug out of the closet by Artusi/Ragusa, that I've had for decades, felt funny. Some scrumbley stuff on the cover,
book worms apparently gnawing on the cloth over the board cover.
I've never seen book worms before.
No, it's not a damp or moldy area...

Anyway, it's in the freezer now.
We'll see.
Maybe my ricotta tortes will get bookworms.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 07:20 pm
@roger,
I like the traditional versions - not so much the variants that involve marshmallow fluff.

mrs hamburgboy used to make a yeast-based flatbready thing with plums on top. It always looked like pizza to me - I didn't realize that we were having an old-school pizza back then.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 07:21 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
If a thing is worth doing, eh, it's worth doing well..

<snip>

I'll type up the sweet recipes as they're interesting - in another later post.


definitely interesting

I certainly didn't realize how old the origins of the fruit pizza were.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 07:23 pm
@ossobuco,
the Neapolitan style one is verra verra similar to a flan/cake/torte thing I ordered for my birthday one year - from a colleague who'd studied cooking in Italy for a few years

now I know what she actually created
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 07:55 pm
@ehBeth,
That Artusi book is interesting. I'd of course skimmed it before, but today I got more interested; it's probably kindled or fried by now.

Later typos on all that I posted were mine, not Olga Ragusa's. Ragusa is a sicilian place (if I remember) but I don't know if she is, or was, the translated book being 60 years old plus, ital american or even from there or neither. I'll look her up, just talking now. (I don't think all who explore italian food have a foot in ital heritage, me, for example.)

Wiki mentioned that the Ada Boni book had an early tomato type pizza recipe, circa 1921 or so.
I just gave away my book of hers (many regions of italy) to the Hab for Humanity a couple of months ago. Let's face it, I'm not going to work up all the recipes, and people like cookbooks.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 08:11 pm
@ossobuco,
Beth, your mother's pizza like thing with plums might have been similar to that red grape focaccia that Martha Stewart made a kind of endurance contest out of, that I did too.. but cut short.

Correct me, but I don't think your mother would have liked as many many risings as Martha (though, maybe). But that Martha recipe was basically very tasty.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 08:51 pm
@ossobuco,
this is much like my mother's except she made hers big and square and flat on a big baking sheet

http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2013/10/purple-plum-torte/
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2014 09:23 pm
@ossobuco,
Ah, more cake-y than focaccia-y. I'll try that one.

Well, hey, I'm saving all this. Girl needs her fruit, as fruit ramps up in prices.
0 Replies
 
JoeBaker
 
  0  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2014 11:09 pm
@vivekpatel,
Here i shared my favourite recipe for the fruit pizza. It has almond extract which makes it more special and increase the vitamins. It has berries which are rich in fiber, so its a complete diet pizza. Use kiwi for topping which gives fresh look to it.
Ingredients-
butter, 2 cups all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar, 1 cup cold butter, 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened, 1/3 cup white sugar, 1 teaspoon almond extract, 2 cups sliced fresh strawberries, 1 cup fresh blueberries,1 kiwi, peeled and sliced, 1 cup unsweetened pineapple juice, 1/2 cup white sugar, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, 1 teaspoon lemon juice.

Steps-
1] Preheat oven to 175 degrees C. Lightly spray a 12-inch round pizza pan with butter.
2] Combine flour and confectioners sugar in a bowl. Cut in butter with a knife or pastry blender until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Press into prepared pizza pan to make a crust.
3] Bake in preheated oven until very lightly browned, 12 to 15 minutes. Cool it.
4] Beat cream cheese, 1/3 cup white sugar, and almond extract until smooth; spread over completely cooled crust. Arrange strawberries, blueberries, and kiwi decoratively over cream cheese mixture.
5] Mix pineapple juice, 1/2 cup white sugar, cornstarch, and lemon juice in a saucepan until smooth; bring to a boil. Cook and stir until thickened, about 2 minutes. Cool slightly and drizzle over fruit. Refrigerate until chilled.
This recipe makes 16 servings
0 Replies
 
 

 
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