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Non-Stick Skillets, Pots and Pans

 
 
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 07:26 pm
I keep seeing ads for Slip Stone skillets on my TV. About $20 plus shipping and handling. They are guaranteed for life. I am highly skeptical. And, so, I want to know what kinds of cookware you are most satisfied with. In a long ago past, I used cast iron skillets for most of my cooking. Now, I use a stainless steel skillet and non metal cooking utensils. If I could find a skillet as good as Slip Stone is claimed to be I would use it almost every day.
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 07:56 pm
@edgarblythe,
I invested in a set of copper cookware, a couple of expensive All-clad skillets and a non stick omelet pan and a non stick sauce pan almost 30 years ago. The All-Clad and copper pans are still going strong and, if I put some elbow grease into it, can still look relatively new. The nonstick pans have been replaced several times due to peeling Teflon.

I've seen those "green" pans too and decided to wait a few years to see if they are just another gimmick.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 08:15 pm
@edgarblythe,
I still use my cast iron pans/pots but not all that often... since I still use my Le Creuset braising pot, middle sized pot, and omelet pan - those are fabulous, bought when my income was less, ah, strict. I consider those as "forevers". I've an ordinary teflon pan for flipping my fish cakes, and similar - seems to be from a firm called Culinary Essentials. I've probably had it ten plus years, no decrepitude yet. Probably bought it in a California grocery store.

I miss my real japanese wok, sigh, from Yamaguchi's in Sawtelle.

In summary, if my omelet pan from Le Creuset is any guide, it's the most well made non stick pan item I've been around.

Adds, their pots are enamel lined - I assume their pans are generally the black non stick type like the good omelet pan.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:08 pm
Edgar, I use my cast iron daily and they are the best. Go back to the cast iron - gramma was right!

Easy maintenance, Stove-top to oven to charcoal to gas grill. The mass alone helps with temperatures even.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:09 pm
@ossobuco,
I've used and really liked Le Creuset, too.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:21 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
When you see so much on the surface when cleaning cast iron and when you don't know how the cast iron is formulated, I prefer stainless steel, which appears more stable.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:24 pm
http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/the-health-hazards-of-cast-iron-pans/
Here is an article on the hazards of cast iron.
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:31 pm
@edgarblythe,
The article addresses mainly people with a genetic trait regarding processing iron (about 1,000,000 people in the US). A well seasoned pan should limit sloughing off of iron. Skillets arenot the only or most dangerous source of iron these people need to avoid.

Please look at this site:

http://www.naturalnews.com/031737_cast_iron_cookware.html
Ten reasons to try cast iron cooking
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:32 pm
@edgarblythe,
My cast iron I bought from an army navy quonset hut shop in, believe it or not, Santa Monica (now a ritzy place, may it rest in peace). Dark in there re my eyes. I wish I bought more. I still use it for Hazan's bolognese.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
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Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:36 pm
@edgarblythe,
Since this product appears to be aluminum with a non-stick coating, I would personally give it a miss.

I prefer stainless steel and/or ceramic-coated pieces.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:37 pm
To each his own. I totally avoid teflon and aluminum and I don't need extra iron in my diet.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:38 pm
@ehBeth,
The underlying structure is aluminum, but the ads I saw don't exactly tell what the stone-like surface layers are.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:42 pm
@edgarblythe,
Cast iron is not so problematic as stainless in terms of knowing what its composition is.

I try to buy used cast iron. I'm looking for a smooth cooking surface and the heaviest construction and no or very little rust.

The trick is using heat and the right oil that will not burn or smoke at cooking temperatures. If I'm using steam or water, I use stainless.

I like the fact I can take cast from stove to oven to charcoal to propane. Three skillets and a dutch oven, with three stainless pot and pans, two enameled steel roasters - I'm set.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
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Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:45 pm
I guess I should add that I'm an avoider of very high heat for my own reasons. This was before the acrylamide scare, or whatever other scares are going on. I'm simply afraid. I'm long time clumsy, more obvious now that I'm older. That has to do with my eyes, as I can miss stuff, though that hasn't gotten worse in many decades, but I am less stable. I also have an almost but not quite funny lack of being able to smell, including gas. (Yes, I can taste.)
So, I tend to saute, or bake.

But maybe my lack of big flames under pans is part of the long life of my cheesy teflon pan.
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:48 pm
@ossobuco,
The faster you cook, the less water escapes the food, the less oil the food absorbs, the less "cooked" the food is.Cast iron is perfect for this. Pan roasting Asperigus in cast is fastand fool proof. Use a drop or two of oil only.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:53 pm
I've no idea what Le Creuset's pans are coated with, whether or not teflon. My one pan by them seems physically quite different from the usual teflons.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:54 pm
I have three or four cast iron skillets of two or three sizes. Haven't taken them out in nearly twenty years.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 09:59 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
Listening. Not arguing. I simply don't do high heat but am interested in why it is good for the rest of you.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 10:14 pm
I use low heat but with pork in particular, I increase the heat near the end.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 10:17 pm
Edgar, this might be of interest to you.

http://www.treehugger.com/slideshows/green-home/9-non-toxic-cookware-brands-safe-and-healthy-home-cooking/#slide-top
 

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