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Non-Stick Skillets, Pots and Pans

 
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 10:17 pm
@ossobuco,
High fired enamel. If I had a lot of money, I'd use Le Creuset. Itsareally good product.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 11:14 pm
@Butrflynet,
I have some Pyrex that I use sometimes.
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 11:28 pm
@edgarblythe,
I'm not familiar with how it cooks, but I am butter fingered and have tile floors. Do they make a Pyrex skillet?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 11:30 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
I don't know for sure. Mine are not skillets.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2014 09:51 am
I have only been using my Pyrex cookware on rare occasions. Yesterday, I discovered that they cook nicer than my skillets. This morning, I fried our eggs in one. Nice.
This thread had caused me to look up consequences of stainless steel cookery. I didn't find definitive answers, so I cooked the sausage in the stainless steel and the eggs in Pyrex. It all went a bit quicker, too.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2014 10:03 am
@edgarblythe,
To my knowledge, stainless steel cookware has no downside about which I have heard. FWIW, I personally have avoided using any cookware that has it. My stainless steel cookware which I bough after I moved 4 years ago is all stainless ...no hi-tech coating.

"There are many grades of stainless steel. Regular stainless steel cookware is made from different alloys including scrap metal. "Most stainless steel sold in stores is of such a nature to allow chrome and nickel to bleed into the foods as the salts and acids of the food react with the pot." Dr. Shelton. For cleanliness and safety reasons, you food should be cooked on only high -grade surgical stainless steel. "

Further research jas turned up this article on stainless-steel cooking:
Stainless Steel

Many health-conscious people swear by stainless steel cookware. But while stainless steel is relatively inert compared to other metals, the metals present in the alloy can be released into food in extremely low quantities. These metals can include nickel, molybdenum, titanium, aluminum, and carbon steel.

Researchers differ on the health effects of these metals leaching from stainless cookware. Most say that while these quantities are not hazardous to the average person, they may affect those with sensitivities. A 1995 study found that stainless steel pans contributed markedly to the levels of nickel in cooked food. In contrast, another study, also released in 1995, found only minor increases in nickel concentrations in acid foodstuffs when new stainless steel pans were used. "
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However stainless coated with the old Teflon formulation did have some downside, especially if it was scratched off. The newest formulation of Teflon coating and other synthetic coatings, is allegedly less risky, but I'd avoid them ... especially when cooking with acidic foods like tomatoes, or cooking with vinegar and when cooking temps are greater than 450 deg F.

I just looked up one resource to see what is being said about no-stick cookware.
http://lowfatcooking.about.com/od/healthandfitness/a/nonstickpans.htm
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2014 10:22 am
@edgarblythe,
Sorry if what I reported was confusing. I was learning as I went along. Stainless is alleged by some researchers to allow some possible exposure to people of low levels of nickel and possibly molybdenum. Whether or not this is carcinogenic at this low level is anyone's guess.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2014 10:33 am
@Ragman,
I searched on google and found so many conflicting views on it, I decided to cut back on how much I use stainless steel. I have felt safest using non metal, non teflon, in cooking, but had been lulled by stainless.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2014 10:40 am
@edgarblythe,
I understand. I think that how a person cook (temps under 450 deg f..and what you cook in it (low acidic foods) matters. I understand that having the desire to be as safe as possible, the best way would be to minimize or eliminate cooking with it.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2014 11:02 am
I also read that dishwasher detergents are so corrosive they can damage the best cookware.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2014 11:21 am
@edgarblythe,
I would say that I'd qualify that with this : it depends on the brand and the chemistry. Arm and Hammer is pretty mild. Also, I use half the strength of dish detergent that the mfr 'recommends'. I also clean all pots and pans by hand (w/ithout any steel wool.

I admit that I cook and eat no meat (other than chicken). Chicken and fish I cook outside on a grill. Though, I admit to a recent switch over to eating bacon. This temporary 'treat' habit has since died off (before it became an addiction).

So all my SS pots and pans have been treated mildly and tend to not have anything acidic or high temp used (cooking or washing) in or on them.
0 Replies
 
 

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