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Are the media missing yet another genocide?

 
 
IronLionZion
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 04:35 pm
Re: Are the media missing yet another genocide?
Tarantulas wrote:
A million people displaced and thousands killed. But it can't be shown to be the USA's fault, so it must not be real news.


A strange conclusion to draw, to say the least. And revelatory of your warped mind. Although this may be too obvious for your liking: the war in Iraq is given more media attention by the American media because it involves America, and therefore it has relevence to Americans. We don't report on genocide in Congo or Sudan because no Americans are dying, and thus, few Americans care.

If you want a clear-cut case of media bias look no further than the Iraq war itself, where the death of a single American soldier is sure to land a few minutes on the nightly news, while the deaths of well over ten thousand innocent civilians go relatively unreported because they are poor, brown, Islamic, not American, and do not jive with the faux-patriotism that the American audience fiends for.

The article is right though: we should devote more time to genocide accross the globe. If only we could give enough of a shit to overcome our overwhelming cultural bias.
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Tarantulas
 
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Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 04:45 pm
Re: Are the media missing yet another genocide?
D'artagnan wrote:
Not sure how this supports your point, Tarantulas.

It doesn't support my point. It was intended as information for Walter.

IronLionZion wrote:
Tarantulas wrote:
A million people displaced and thousands killed. But it can't be shown to be the USA's fault, so it must not be real news.

A strange conclusion to draw, to say the least. And revelatory of your warped mind.

Warped mind? How so?
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IronLionZion
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 05:16 pm
Re: Are the media missing yet another genocide?
Quote:
IronLionZion wrote:
Tarantulas wrote:
A million people displaced and thousands killed. But it can't be shown to be the USA's fault, so it must not be real news.

A strange conclusion to draw, to say the least. And revelatory of your warped mind.

Warped mind? How so?


I think I did as good a job as I - and by extension anybody else because I'm amazing - explaining that in my last response to you. In any case, it would be a good place to start.
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McGentrix
 
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Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 05:50 pm
So, ILZ is complaining that the US media is concerned about US events more so than it is about foreigners because "they are poor, brown, Islamic, not American, and do not jive with the faux-patriotism that the American audience fiends for."

Well, duh. Of course your insulting language highlights your warped mind and shows off your intellectual backruptcy.
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IronLionZion
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 05:56 pm
McGentrix wrote:
So, ILZ is complaining that the US media is concerned about US events more so than it is about foreigners because "they are poor, brown, Islamic, not American, and do not jive with the faux-patriotism that the American audience fiends for."

Well, duh. Of course your insulting language highlights your warped mind and shows off your intellectual backruptcy.


Well, duh, indeed. That is why I prefaced my comments with "this may be too obvious for your liking." However, I felt compelled to point it out because Tarantulas apparently thought that this skew in reporting was due to the medias desire to attack and criticize American actions.
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yilmaz101
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 05:12 am
the sudanese government has requested international help for the refugee situtation on the border. It is now up to the interntional community to send in peacemakers and prevent the genocide. Sometimes things reach a degree of complexity that it cannot be fully comprehended. I for one am not sure what exacty is going on there, I mean if it was a genocide supported by the govt, why request international help? could be a civil war sort of situation that the government is not able to contain on its own....
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 12:46 pm
Yilmaz, i believe that this all grew out of the Muslim "radicalism" of the Sudanese government, which stood idly by while crackpot Muslim fundamentalists took the attitudes of government as a green light to persecute a sizable christian minority (caveat: I'm not suggesting that all Muslims are crackpots, but crackpots do come in every political and religious flavor). This lead to a civil war which has now gotten beyond the control of government, and has raged for a generation.
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Tarantulas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 01:07 pm
It is the peace-loving Muslim religion spreading across yet another country. The same thing is happening in Thailand.
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IronLionZion
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 01:19 pm
Setanta wrote:
Yilmaz, i believe that this all grew out of the Muslim "radicalism" of the Sudanese government, which stood idly by while crackpot Muslim fundamentalists took the attitudes of government as a green light to persecute a sizable christian minority (caveat: I'm not suggesting that all Muslims are crackpots, but crackpots do come in every political and religious flavor). This lead to a civil war which has now gotten beyond the control of government, and has raged for a generation.


Perhaps. In any case, the conflict which is taking place in Darfur, which is in western Sudan, is fairly independent of the broader conflict between the Muslims in north Sudan and the Christian and animist tribes in the south.

The dymanics of the conflict in Darfur are complex and bizarre. A plethora of different tribes inhabit the region, and the vast majority of them are Muslim. The conflict seems to exist between the Sudanese government, which considers itself Muslim and Arabic, and the Muslims in Darfur which consider themselves African (which they basically are, in terms of language and lifestyle; primarily farmers as opposed to nomadic arab tribes, etc, etc, etc.)
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IronLionZion
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 01:25 pm
Tarantulas wrote:
It is the peace-loving Muslim religion spreading across yet another country. The same thing is happening in Thailand.


Retarded innuendo.

Yeah, those crazy Muslims, what with thier reckless infighting and wonton murder. Nothing like us Christians, with our esteemed history of subjucating and, at times, exterminating races all over the globe in a mad quest to plunder their wealth and impose our alien and assbackwards forms of morality on them.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 01:25 pm
Yes, but the government of the Sudan is nonetheless reaching its breaking point. I was not suggesting that what happens in the west is a part of the north-south conflict, and did not make that clear. The "nation" of the Sudan is fragmenting, however, because of the irresponsible lack of the exercise of authority by government, in my never humble opinion.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 01:25 pm
Quote:
Narathiwat, Yala and Pattani were part of the former independent Muslim kingdom of Pattani, annexed by Thailand in 1902.

The people of the south have strong ethnic and cultural ties with neighboring Malaysia. They speak Yawi, a dialect of Malay, and many identify themselves as Pattanis, not Thais.

The government imposes the Thai language in schools and colleges and gives most government jobs to Buddhist Thais, deepening local resentment
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IronLionZion
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 01:34 pm
Setanta wrote:
Yes, but the government of the Sudan is nonetheless reaching its breaking point. I was not suggesting that what happens in the west is a part of the north-south conflict, and did not make that clear. The "nation" of the Sudan is fragmenting, however, because of the irresponsible lack of the exercise of authority by government, in my never humble opinion.


Your post left me with the impression that you think the Darfur conflict was caused by the North/South civil war.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 01:42 pm
I realize as much, i was not clear in indicating that the original conflict, and the lack of any move by the government to restrain the actions of radical elements in Sudanese society lead to what i view as the dissolution of the Sudan as a nation.
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IronLionZion
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 01:47 pm
Setanta wrote:
I realize as much, i was not clear in indicating that the original conflict, and the lack of any move by the government to restrain the actions of radical elements in Sudanese society lead to what i view as the dissolution of the Sudan as a nation.


Ah.
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Setanta
 
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Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 02:23 pm
I would like to add to this that the situation in the Sudan is the product of the same tragedy which overtook the Biafrans in the 1960's, and the Hutu and Tutsi in Rawanda. The national boundaries of the Sudan are a product of Kitchener marching from Khartoum to Fashoda to forestall the French. The Sudan became a "nation" after it was abandoned in its current "configuration" by the English. Much the same has happened throughout Africa. In Nigeria, the Biafrans were a minority "nation," the Igbo; because of their success as professionals during the colonial regime, and the perception of the Yoruba and Hausa that they were "taking over" Nigeria, which the Igbo claimed was being played out in discrimination, they attempted to create a new nation, and were crushed by the Nigerian government. No one with any knowledge of the tribal boundaries and the entrenched hatred between tribes would have created the "nation" of Rawanda. The colonizing powers carved up Africa by drawing lines on a largely blank map, which did not indicate the tribes and their traditional territories. Saddly, one can expect this sort of thing to go on for many, many years to come.

This is not a statement of racial condescension on my part either. After all, i am descended from the Irish, from both sides of the "Pale." My ancestors have gleefully slaughtered one another for centuries over the matter of a difference in christian confession. That Africans would do the same for reasons of tribal distinctions makes them no worse, nor any better.
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Tarantulas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 02:32 pm
Yeah? When is the last time the Christians exterminated a race?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 02:37 pm
Tarantulas wrote:
Yeah? When is the last time the Christians exterminated a race?


Actually just now they are doing such in Nigeria, namely starting a kind of "genocide": more than thousand Hausa Muslims around the town of Yelwa in Plateau state were killed the last few days by Christian fighters.
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mporter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2004 07:29 pm
And, Tarantulas, Don't forget that the Germans tried to exterminate a race- The Jews. Since Germany is about 55% Lutheran and 38% Roman Catholic, it would seems that the country qualifies as a Christian country, in name if not in reality.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 May, 2004 12:02 am
mporter wrote:
Since Germany is about 55% Lutheran and 38% Roman Catholic, it would seems that the country qualifies as a Christian country, in name if not in reality.


What even wasn't true in 1933. (Today's figures: Protestant 34%, Roman Catholic 34%, Muslim 3.7%, unaffiliated more than 20%.)
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