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Is the comma after "simultaneously" correct?

 
 
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 05:29 pm
Pressing both switches simultaneously, effectively widens the mid-frequency bandwidth (i.e., Q factor) while the center frequency simply remains at A440—a great option for incorporating accents (ref. fig. 3b).
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Type: Question • Score: 8 • Views: 2,225 • Replies: 19
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Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 08:34 pm
@englishman,
yes.
robert-blankenship
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2014 08:56 pm
@Ragman,
Truly? I've never seen that before. The first clause is an event that causes the next, and is not parenthetical or incidental at all.
Mika Anna
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 11:48 am
@englishman,
No, I don't think it is correct.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 12:03 pm
@robert-blankenship,
Quote:
and is not parenthetical or incidental at all.
Comma has other functions and I think in this case it's okay. But I might reword

In effect, pressing both switches simultaneously widens the mid-frequency bandwidth...

Simultaneously pressing both switches effectively widens...

0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 12:27 pm
There is no need for the comma, and I would definitely omit it.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 12:50 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
I would definitely omit it
I wouldn't. Without the comma we're not sure whether "effectively" modifies "pressing" or "widens"

contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 01:08 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Without the comma we're not sure whether "effectively" modifies "pressing" or "widens"


We are sure, because if effectively modifies pressing there would have to be an 'and' after simultaneously.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 01:59 pm
@contrex,
Point well taken, Con. Furthermore, because comma is often a sub for "and," we might presume "simultaneously" modifies "widens" instead of "pressing"

Granted it's a stretch because then we might expect another "and" later in the sentence. Eg., for the benefit of the esl becoming confused by our interchange

Pressing both switches simultaneously and effectively widens the mid-frequency bandwidth (i.e., Q factor) and allows the center frequency simply to remain at A440…...

Of course it could still be construed as a lousy sentence because then we couldn't know whether "simultaneously and effectively" modifies "widens" or "pressing", the immediate reaction being, how does one press switches effectively

What fun!
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 02:34 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
Of course it could still be construed as a lousy sentence because then we couldn't know whether "simultaneously and effectively" modifies "widens" or "pressing", the immediate reaction being, how does one press switches effectively


Effectively can be used (at least) three ways, and I read the word as having meaning (2) of these:

1. Modifying a preceding verb in which case it means "efficiently, productively, in such a way as to achieve the desired results" -

Make sure that resources are used effectively.
How to use PowerPoint effectively.
Communicating effectively


2. As a substitute for "in effect" -

He stopped taking his medication, effectively making his breakdown occur.
By withholding further funds they effectively killed the project.
By pressing both switches simultaneously you effectively widen the mid-frequency bandwidth.

3. To mean "virtually, really, in fact, essentially, in effect, in reality, in truth, as good as, in actual fact, to all intents and purposes, in all but name, in actuality, for practical purposes" -

The region was effectively independent.
Although small pockets of fighting continued, the battle was effectively over.

contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 02:43 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
Of course it could still be construed as a lousy sentence because then we couldn't know whether "simultaneously and effectively" modifies "widens" or "pressing", the immediate reaction being, how does one press switches effectively


Exactly, which is why you don't need the comma.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 04:04 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
Effectively can be used (at least) three ways
Thanks Con but yes, I'm aware

the immediate reaction being, how does one press switches effectively
Quote:
Exactly, which is why you don't need the comma.
Exactly the point I supposed I was making, if ineffectively
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Apr, 2014 05:12 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Exactly the point I supposed I was making, if ineffectively


I thought you made it pretty well
anonymously99
 
  0  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 03:00 am
@englishman,
Quote:
factor) wh


I would locate/place the comma between the closing parenthese and the letter w.

Along with taking the word simultaneously out of the sentence.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 11:36 am
@contrex,
Quote:
I thought you made it pretty well
Why thank you Con, a little encouragement is a rare commodity hereabout
Now if I could only remember what it was
0 Replies
 
anonymously99
 
  0  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 01:23 pm
@englishman,
Or no comma, with the word simultaneously taken out.

Or leave as is.

I don't know. I still want to put a comma before that w on the word while.

No I think it will be okay with no comma before the w on the word while.
0 Replies
 
anonymously99
 
  0  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 01:26 pm
@englishman,
I think the sentence is fine.

It's a wonderful/good/beautiful/ah, pleasant feeling once having understood. the sentence.

I was looking for the right word to use to describe my feelings. I was talking to myself in my head.
0 Replies
 
englishman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 20 Apr, 2014 08:15 am
Thanks guy's ('n gals). I appreciate all of the great replies.

I now have one more sentence for you. I'm, again, unsure about the comma after the words "given step":

"Pressing a key allows each engaged step to sound, as driven by the sequencer (the resultant pitch of a given step, being dependent upon the Step Pitch Tuner setting and the key being pressed)."
0 Replies
 
selectmytutor
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 25 Nov, 2016 04:48 am
@englishman,
Yes
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 Nov, 2016 12:07 pm
@selectmytutor,
Selectmytutor, you gave a wrong answer to a two-and-a-half-year old question!

0 Replies
 
 

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