7
   

Homemade Nonskid Paint?

 
 
Pitter
 
Reply Fri 14 Mar, 2014 05:18 pm
I have some ceramic tile covered steps leading up to my house which become dangerously slippery when wet. I want to paint antiskid strips on them. On the net I found a suggestion to paint with an epoxy paint and when slightly tacky sprinkle kitchen salt over the still wet painted area. Does that sound odd? I would have thought plain old sand would do but haven't seen that suggested anywhere. Any thoughts?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 7 • Views: 1,276 • Replies: 10
No top replies

 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Mar, 2014 05:35 pm
the salt will dissolve in the first rain, I would think. It might conceivably leave small pockmarks in the paint where it had been before it dissolved, which might have the effect of making the paint less smooth and even, hence somewhat non-skiddish, but i wouldn't bet on it. Sand sprinkled in the paint while it was still wet and tacky would seem like a better idea. Don't know how well it would adhere when the paint dried.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 01:04 am
@Pitter,
I have successfully used sand mixed with gloss paint on the steel ledges of a canal boat, and also on wooden external steps.
knaivete
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 01:39 am
@fresco,
Is this just another example of where you :

Quote:
glibly pontificate on mattes


sic

The juxtaposition of these two threads was too too much.

Please excuse me while I compose myself.
fresco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 03:06 am
@knaivete,
Laughing
I only pontificate on gloss !
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 04:20 am
Many years ago, after i got out of the army, one of my first jobs was working in a paint store. They used to sell sand to be mixed with floor paint to create a non-skid surface. (Floor pain is just a very thin, high-gloss enamel.) It's amazing what you can sell to the gullible. I would advise mixing sand with your paint, and i don't see any reason to go to the trouble and expense of using epoxy paint, unless you don't think an ordinary enamel will adhere to the tile surface. The sand you use, though, should be finer than what you will see on the beach. You can probably get a fine grade sand at a lumber yard, or one of those big box home improvement stores. I would say, though, that you shouldn't tell them what you want it for, because then they are likely to try to steer you toward an unnecessarily expensive product.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 04:22 am
You might also be able to get an inexpensive, fine grain sand at a plant nursery or a "yard and garden" center.
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 04:24 am
@Setanta,
Mr. Green
0 Replies
 
Pitter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 05:43 am
@Setanta,
Thank you all for your replies. I will seek out some fine grained sand.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 12:23 pm
I was told that cheap own brand bleach when applied to tiles kills all the microorganisms that cause a lot of slippage. A cheap stopgap.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Mar, 2014 03:37 pm
@Pitter,
If you get sand intended for sand blasting, it will be (or should be) sharp edged instead of rounded grains. Not sure it's worth the extra cost, but it would be somewhat better.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Color! Color! Color! - Discussion by plainoldme
Some more paint questions! - Question by boomerang
Wall painting - Question by alastorginn
Help me identify this tile. - Question by diegoalda
Your favourite colour - Discussion by DudeSid
Car paint. - Question by Glennn
red mold? - Question by momodo85
Trying to identify this artwork - Question by Hd24234
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Homemade Nonskid Paint?
Copyright © 2018 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/20/2018 at 04:22:06