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Pancakes for Pancake Day or any other day or night

 
 
Reply Sat 1 Mar, 2014 05:41 pm
There's a Shrove Tuesday Pancake Day in England right about now, so I've been reading various pancake recipes that have been showing up lately in The Guardian. Haven't tried any of them yet, but probably will. Meantime, I've had a recipe for savory green onion pancakes apparently from a David Chang cookbook, David the guy who is chef/owner at Momofuku, on my desktop waiting for me for a couple of months. It's from a site from a blogger who had tried to replicate all the recipes in the book. Today's the day. Or night, as they'll turn into dinner with leftovers to freeze.
(or maybe tomorrow, as it's getting later)

The blog link (lots of photos) - http://momofukufor2.com/2010/01/green-onion-pancakes-recipe/

Green Onion Pancakes Recipe




Please add your favorite pancake recipes, however adventurous - - -

http://momofukufor2.com/blog/photos/2010/01/momofuku-0009-450x301.jpg

Ingredients
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cups boiling water
1/4 cup cold water
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
3 tablespoons oil or other fat substitute
1 bunch of green onions finely sliced
oil for frying

Directions
1. Combine sifted flour, salt and boiling water in a bowl and stir until the water is absorbed. Let the dough cool, add the cold water and knead until smooth. I used my hands, but feel free to use a dough hook and your stand mixer. The dough will be soft, but not excessively sticky.

2. Transfer the dough to an oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let rest for an hour. The dough won’t rise much, but this resting period allows the gluten in the flour to develop.

3. Remove the dough from the bowl and put it on a slightly floured surface. Shape into a log and divide in to 8 pieces. The 8 pieces will yield 5-6 inch pancakes depending on thickness. If you want smaller or bigger pancakes, divide the dough accordingly.

4. Take a piece of dough and roll it out as thin as you can. The thinner you roll your dough, the more flaky layers the pancake will have.

5. Brush a thin layer of oil, or choice of fat, on the pancake and sprinkle with green onions. Use as many or as little green onions as you like.

6. Roll the dough up like you would a cinnamon bun, that is, into a tube shape. Then form a coil with the tube and pinch the end shut.

7. Now you can either roll out the pancake or repeat the above steps with your remaining dough. If you want to roll out your pancakes, flatten your coils with the palm of your hand and proceed to use your rolling pin to roll the coils into pancakes. The thickness of the pancake is entirely up to you. If you like your pancakes crispy, roll them thinly, if you like a chewier pancake, roll them a bit thicker. Don’t worry if green onions start sticking out of the dough, it’s fine.

8. At this point if you don’t want to fry your pancakes, stack them with sheets of parchment paper in between and wrap them tightly and freeze them. They will keep in the freezer for about a month. You can fry them straight out of the freezer.

9. To fry, heat oil in a frying pan (I prefer cast-iron) until it is shimmery and hot. Swirl the oil around so the pan is coated. You need enough oil to coat the bottom of the pan, but not so much that the pancake is swimming. Fry both sides of the pancake on medium heat until brown and crispy. Drain on paper towels to remove excess oil.

10. Cut into wedges and enjoy!

I figure the green onions could be other greens and things that would fill the bill - chives, ital parsley, whatever. Right now, I do have some scallions on hand.



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Type: Discussion • Score: 5 • Views: 3,041 • Replies: 27

 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Mar, 2014 06:03 pm
Pancakes and how we eat them in the UK on Shrove Tuesday.

Pancake batter recipes are roughly the same, and my family one is :

Cup of flour (plain)
Cup of milk
Egg

Multiples thereof for bigger quantities.

Mix flour and milk first, then beat in the egg.

Cook pancakes in usual way.

Usual toppings in my house, and every other household I know, usually consists of three options....

1.Sugar, lemon juice.

2. Syrup.

3. Butter, sugar, lemon juice.

(Toppings may vary by region around the country)


A Pancake Race held each Shrove Tuesday, about five miles from where I live.....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/threecounties/content/images/2007/02/20/olney_pancake_race_470_470x250.jpg
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 07:47 am
@Lordyaswas,
we will have a feast of "Punchkies" or "Fastnachts". The best are made of a potato flour that, when mixed and yeasted up, is allowed to stand and ferment a day or so. When these are fried they have a nice crunch and a sweetness that can only be developed via the fermentation.
Seems that fermentation of our food is becoming rather hoydy toydy
In the USA

I don't much like pancakes made with baking powder or baking soda. I need a yeasty flavor in my baked goods
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 07:50 am
@farmerman,
bigniets rule
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 08:32 am
@Lordyaswas,
Uhm . . . no baking powder?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 08:34 am
Buttermilk really makes a pancake . . . same for biscuits, and if you make buttermilk biscuits properly, you use far less shortening.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 08:40 am
@Setanta,
Nope.

I've eaten shrove Tuesday pancakes in many mates houses......at least ten or so, and not one used baking powder.
I can't speak for the rest of the country, but it is/was always made like that in my part of NW London.

One, one and one. Nuffink else, guv.



Here's a Brit recipe, which is basically the same (about two two and two in this case) apart from a pinch of salt.

We couldn't afford salt.

http://britishfood.about.com/od/pancakeday/r/pancakes.htm
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 09:26 am
@farmerman,
I'm going to have to try making those, sound good to me.

I wrote a long post about some pancakes and crepes yesterday, following that up by not clicking reply. Just having my coffee now, will post more later in the day.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 10:16 am
@Lordyaswas,
you've just defined the diff between pncakes and crepes. Crepes don't have any baking soda or baking powder Thast why I like them and I don't like pancakes. The sodium carbonate and bicarbonate impart a "toxic landfill" taste in my mouth.

I like sweeter crepes and only like savory ones when we have some kind of swafood like smoke salmon or crab salad, and (while I usually hate rolls), we make em into seafood crepe rolls

IMrs F makes dynamite crepes . She dips the bottom of a small
Griswold pan into the batter and then just flips it over the gas flame end this just pops out as a neat crepe
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 10:19 am
@ossobuco,
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Turnip-Cake-Law-Bock-Gow-100779

turnip pancakes are my favourites - they're often on dim sum carts here and I found some in the freezer section at the Chinese grocery superstore

Chinese turnip is more like radish than what most of us think of as turnip

wonderfully peppery taste

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 10:21 am
@ehBeth,
sorta like a radish lattke ? I dint read the recipe as it didn't regiter for some reason
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 10:24 am
@farmerman,
you could make a cheater version that could be described as a radish latke

lots of veggies work well like that - carrots and onions make a particularly good veggie latke
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 10:26 am
As much as I like pancakes and their cousins, I'm most excited that Prune Paczki season has started here. First ones were in the store yesterday. Yum.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 10:29 am
@ehBeth,
splain to us non-prune paczki eaters. sounds like an Orthodox Russian Easter thingy, is it?. Ive had fig bleenies anything like them?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 10:38 am
@farmerman,
Paczki are a really yeasty Polish donut thing made for Orthodox Easter.

http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/desserts/r/Paczki.htm

like any good fried yeast treat, you've got to eat them right away

http://0.tqn.com/d/easteuropeanfood/1/I/t/n/-/-/grandmas-paczki.jpg
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 10:42 am
@ehBeth,
OOOOHHHH, that's what we call a PUNCHKY of which I spoke in my first note. OK, yes they are good, A polish/Estonian/Lithuanian Bigniet.
Ill have to compare the recipes for bigniets v Punchkies
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 11:44 am
@ehBeth,
Mmm, I can't easily get chinese turnips here, but I can sometimes find japanese daikon. You're giving me ideas.
Plus, the latke thing, more ideas.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 11:49 am
@ossobuco,
on my list

http://www.organicgardening.com/cook/curried-carrot-latkes-mint-and-mango-raita
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 11:54 am
@ehBeth,
Uh oh. I have most of those items at hand.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Mar, 2014 11:56 am
@ehBeth,
They sound wonderful!

That's sorted Monday supper!
 

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