22
   

Do you tip your bartender?

 
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2013 10:04 am
@Lordyaswas,
Quote:
I can now see and understand more of the American side of this tipping custom business a lot more than I could before.
I hope that quite a few of the Americans can see the British side of this argument and understand a bit of where we're coming from on all of this.

You hit it perfectly. One is right over the other - just different customs. Personally I think it best out of respect of where you are visiting to adopt their customs as long as it is reasonable and easy enough. Myself I try to prepare by simply reading about the local customs just to try to avoid as much as possible my own personal embarassment (well and to be be respectful of where you are visiting).
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2013 12:25 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:

Isn't it funny how quite a few threads start off with the participants stating their case and quickly taking sides, then passionately arguing that their case is the correct one whilst still being pretty reasonable.

What always gets me is how nonpolitical threads (this basically started out as an etiquette thread) turns political. I never expected this thread to get such a high turnout when I started it. I thought it would have ended a day or two after I posted it.

Quote:
I hope that quite a few of the Americans can see the British side of this argument and understand a bit of where we're coming from on all of this.

The purpose of this thread was about the general etiquette of tipping and (specifically) the nontraditional tipping on open bars where the drinker/patron gets his or her drinks free. The thread evolved radically from there. I knew, understood, and accepted the European/Brit tradition of nontipping long before I started this thread. But let's not get our hopes up and assume that the European/Brit model will ever be allowed here in the US (not allowed by the collective restaurant owners).

Every once and awhile, I hear the clarion call to ban tips and force restaurant management to pay waitstaff a livable wage. Sounds like a great idea and I hope that fast food workers also get their proverbial rising tide (a livable wage). I don't expect the current wave/movement for fast food workers will catch them the $15 an hour they're calling for. They should be expecting something considerably lower then that if the powers that be finally concede to them the right to a slightly better income.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2013 07:48 pm
@tsarstepan,
Oh please. You and particularly Lordyaswas should stop patting one another on your backs for your aversion to politicizing subjects.
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2013 09:11 pm
Dis anyone else just feel that gust of hot air?????? Oh look, it's Finn!!!! Nevermind!
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  5  
Reply Tue 17 Dec, 2013 02:02 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
What's wrong, Finn?

People being reasonable and acknowedging both sides of the argument, are they?

The author has two choices when launching a new thread. Question or Discussion.
Maybe you should ask the hamsters to add a "sneering point scoring argument" button?

Finn dAbuzz
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Dec, 2013 12:08 am
@Lordyaswas,
What's wrong?

Any absurd suggestion by you that you are objective.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Dec, 2013 02:28 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
I will not take your bait, Mr Begrumpled.

Anyone can read my earlier post and make up their own minds.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Dec, 2013 02:36 pm
Found this map

http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/a_zps96c04368.jpg

The minimum wage at McDonald's in Germany is $10.70 (average is $14,20).
Germlat
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Dec, 2013 07:38 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Not understanding the relevance of this post. McDonlds is slightly better than a vending machine since your food can at least be warm..but no service involved . You pick up the food and condiments, drinks..get your own drink refills and dispose of garbage . The average this worker makes in the U.S. Is minimum wage. Which as for now is $7.00 and cents. In the U.S service is compensated with tips. But then tips are accepted at Starbucks...don't really see rhyme or reason for it. My opinion is when in Rome do as Romans do.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Dec, 2013 07:41 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Indeed Lord Sunshine.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 18 Dec, 2013 07:43 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Entirely irrelevant to the discussion thus far.

If you wish to introduce a new avenue, perhaps you could introduce it better.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  5  
Reply Thu 19 Dec, 2013 12:00 am
@Germlat,
Wekk, you can see that in those countries, where the wage is regulated, employees have health insurance, paid holidays etc included, a tip really is a surplus.

But sorry, if that is entirely irrelevant.
Germlat
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Dec, 2013 06:25 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Good information actually .. I wish some hard working employees would get that here..simply didn't understand the relevance but thanks for the info. It's all good.
0 Replies
 
 

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