9
   

Rubbing pregnant womens bellies

 
 
chai2
 
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 06:37 am
Your thoughts?

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/can-t-touch-this--pregnant-mom-lawsuit-takes-on-belly-rubbing-211618835.html

Reading some of the comments below this story bothered, but didn't surprise me, like the following....

"What 's next. I'm quite sure that if this man was considered a hunk nothing would of been. Women today have all the power and wield it at their discretion. Maybe men should do the same thing when given a pat on the back from a male or female co-worker."

Besides the fact that a pat on the back is not the same as rubbing someone's abdomen, there's the whole "if he were a hunk it wouldn't be a problem" Following that logic, if he were a hunk, you wouldn't mind him raping you.

I've never been pregnant, and I'll admit, in the far past I've been guilty of reaching out and feeling someone's belly while they were pregnant. Until I realized what an invasion that was.

Then there's this whole "asking for permission" thing? Why would you even ask someone that? You're really putting the women in a awkward place. Sure she can say no, but in life, that can now create a whole new set of weird/negative feelings. In theory, the woman obviously shouldn't feel bad about telling someone not to touch them, in practice, telling some well meaning person no can lead to more conversation you didn't even want to have.

I'll tell ya, I have to hand it to pregnant women throughout the ages, who didn't snap at someone "leave me alone!"
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 07:24 am
I've never understood the need to "touch" a pregnancy bump and never had that happen to me. (3 kids)

But a LAWSUIT ? Ridiculous.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 08:39 am
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:
I've never understood the need to "touch" a pregnancy bump and never had that happen to me. (3 kids)

But a LAWSUIT ? Ridiculous.
It is BATTERY.
Everyone shud keep his hands off of everyone else.





David
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 08:48 am
The article says that the pregnant woman filed a lawsuit alleging harassment. I agree with the attorney quoted in the article who says that this would be a difficult case to win. The woman could always file suit alleging battery (which is an unpermitted touching) - she'd win, but she'd likely receive only nominal damages.
chai2
 
  0  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 10:44 am
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:

she'd win, but she'd likely receive only nominal damages.


So?

Sometimes it's not about the money.
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 11:42 am
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
So?

So that's why she suing for harassment rather than battery.

chai2 wrote:
Sometimes it's not about the money.

Except, apparently, in this case.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 11:44 am
@joefromchicago,
I can see that. The more he pays, the more he learns.
joefromchicago
 
  2  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 01:09 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

I can see that. The more he pays, the more he learns.

I have a sneaking suspicion that the person who learns the most will be the pregnant woman.
0 Replies
 
McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 01:32 pm
Who in their right mind would just go around and think it is alright to touch a strangers belly? That's seriously creepy.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 01:36 pm
@McGentrix,
It is, I agree.

Although someone said they never had anyone come up and do that to them while pregnant, I've been with, and watched it happen to other pregnant women.

It's like suddenly their belly is public property.

When my sister, or a close friend was pregnant, I thought it was really cool to see the baby moving around, and my sister would say to me "oh, feel the baby moving", and take my hand and put it where the baby was.

But that was my sister, and she asked me, and knew I wanted to feel the baby.
0 Replies
 
McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 01:46 pm
I'd seriously push a stranger away pretty hard if they had approached my pregnant wife to rub her belly. There's just no room for that and it's bad manners.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 01:48 pm
Absurdly litigating American people. What else is new?
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 02:04 pm
@McGentrix,
McGentrix wrote:

I'd seriously push a stranger away pretty hard if they had approached my pregnant wife to rub her belly. There's just no room for that and it's bad manners.


You're getting no argument from me.

A lot of times though, it seems to come from other women, not men. Like it's some sort of "sisterhood" thing. Since I mostly rubbed the belly of my own sister, or close friend, I can get that...it was cool. Especially with my sister, there was that whole looking in each others eyes, being happy for her, knowing the baby was my niece.

When I unthinkingly did that in my younger years, it wasn't with bad intent, but know I realize it was imposing.

Babies don't interest me much, for some reason, pregnant women, with the baby growing inside them do.

To this day, when I see a pregnant woman, I'm always really interested in what's going on with them. Not the part that they'll be a mother, or have a baby out in the world, but the fact that their body is Growing it. And the fact that I can believe they are walking around with this huge load and how miserable it must be.
FOUND SOUL
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 02:43 pm
@chai2,
A 57 year old visits his neighbour who is 30, pregnant, gives her a hug, then states "I just want to be friends" and then touches her belly?

"I just want to be friends?" Frig, I'd push him out the door too with concern but why did she let him give her a hug, if she didn't feel comfortable, given he is her neighbour? I think this has to do with the comment more so than him touching her belly...

Why did he make that comment? Something else going on I feel.

I think it is a personal thing, usually as you say Chai, "feel the baby kick", maybe she should have "kicked" him and then been done with it Smile
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 03:03 pm
Disturbing to put it nicely. If she offers the opporunity to somebody, fine, otherwise hands off.

More and a news clip from Troutman, herself.
www.abc27.com/story/23812514/pregnant-woman-at-center-of-belly-touching-case-speaks-out
joefromchicago
 
  2  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 04:02 pm
@Sturgis,
Sturgis wrote:

I must have skipped the part in Chai's linked article that said that this was a criminal case, not a civil case. Perhaps I was misled by the link for that article, which refers to the woman's "lawsuit." Anyway, your article makes it clear that this is purely a criminal matter, so my previous remarks about bringing a battery lawsuit are inapt. My apologies to all.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2013 04:09 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:

Sturgis wrote:

I must have skipped the part in Chai's linked article that said that this was a criminal case, not a civil case. Perhaps I was misled by the link for that article, which refers to the woman's "lawsuit." Anyway, your article makes it clear that this is purely a criminal matter, so my previous remarks about bringing a battery lawsuit are inapt. My apologies to all.
It is possible that remedies in tort
are available qua the factual situations that have given rise to criminal litigation.
Indeed, it is very possible that a criminal conviction, in some cases,
can stand as a competent foundation for a grant of summary judgment
(on liability) in a tortious case founded upon the same facts; e.g. rape.
(Depending on which jurisdiction), the civil plaintiff cud then
proceed by inquest to ascertain the extent of pecuniary damages.
Civil liability 'd be un-deniable within that jurisprudential environment.
(The niceties of procedural law r not necessarily exactly the same
from one jurisdiction to another.)





David
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Rubbing pregnant womens bellies
Copyright © 2024 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 02/29/2024 at 06:37:25