12
   

Prison for an NRA T-shirt in school??

 
 
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 06:59 am
http://freedomoutpost.com/2013/06/14-year-old-arrested-for-wearing-nra-shirt-may-go-to-jail/

Quote:

What kind of a system puts a 14 year old kid in jail for a t-shirt? This has to be one of the most bizarre cases of the year. Jared Marcum was arrested at Logan Middle School back in April. His only apparent crime seems to be in his choice of wardrobe for the day. Fox News reported on April 23rd:

The teen’s lawyer, Ben White, says school administrators maintain that Marcum disrupted the educational process. ......


Read more: http://freedomoutpost.com/2013/06/14-year-old-arrested-for-wearing-nra-shirt-may-go-to-jail/#ixzz2WThLLQwR
 
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 08:22 am
Too bad they cant put people in jail for BS posts.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 08:48 am
@gungasnake,
It drives me crazy when people start saying things like this are a free speech issue.

It's really a zero tolerance issue.

If the shirt had said "NRA" and not had a picture of a gun on it the kid would have been fine. It was the image of a gun that caused the problem.

Zero tolerance policies are stupid.
gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 09:23 am
@boomerang,
That would be like a shirt which said "Chevrolet" on it but didn't have a picture of car.
MontereyJack
 
  2  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 09:29 am
I saw hats on sale at a flea market just like that, gunga. A Chevrolet logo. No car. Is there a problem with that? I might add that Justice Scalia, speaking for the majority of the Supreme court in Heller, said that it was perfectly proper to regulate guns in public assemblages like schools, and ban them from there.
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 09:31 am
@gungasnake,
There are a lot of Chevy shirts that don't have pictures of cars.

I bet he could wear this t-shirt

http://www.nrastore.com/nrastore/images/detail/453ps.jpg
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 04:26 pm
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:
I might add that Justice Scalia, speaking for the majority of the Supreme court in Heller, said that it was perfectly proper to regulate guns in public assemblages like schools, and ban them from there.

I'm not entirely sure that an image on a T-shirt counts as a gun.

I think this one is more a First Amendment issue than a Second Amendment issue.
0 Replies
 
mysteryman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 04:36 pm
@boomerang,
According to the report I read, which I will find and post, there is nothing in the student handbook that made wearing that shirt against the rules.

And he was charged with obstructing an officer because he wouldn't stop talking, nothing more.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 05:38 pm
@mysteryman,
I'll bet it isn't in the dress code but I'm thinking there is some zero tolerance policy about guns somewhere in their school rules.

As silly as it is everything can pretty much be counted as a gun these days on school grounds -- including a drawing of a gun on your t-shirt.

I'm also willing to bet that he wouldn't have disturbed anyone with his shirt if the teacher/administrator/"resource" officer/whoever hadn't made an issue of it.
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 06:04 pm
@boomerang,
The T-Shirt shows an M16 style rifle with the logo "NRA Protect Your Rights".

I've mentioned this before, Kalashnikov-action rifles are vastly more robust and reliable than M16s and, given the new reality in which Russia, not the USA, is the preeminent Christian nation on Earth and the main defender of Christians, I could picture a T-shirt with a picture of an AK or an SVD and a logo like "Kalashnikov, Right Arm of the Christian World:

http://boards.cannabis.com/attachments/games-arcade-talk/132779d1177551294-battlefield-2-pc-version-while-smokin-weed-svd01.jpg
Калашников - Правдая Рука Христяньского Мира

Picture going to school with a T-shirt like that??
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 07:23 pm
........
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  0  
Reply Mon 17 Jun, 2013 07:25 pm
.......
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jun, 2013 06:22 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:

That would be like a shirt which said "Chevrolet" on it but didn't have a picture of car.

http://cdn103.iofferphoto.com/img3/item/526/840/550/chevrolet-car-motorsport-t-shirt-d4d5.jpg
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jun, 2013 07:28 am
Quote:
Although the school’s dress code makes no mention of NRA paraphernalia, it currently states the following: “If in the judgment of the administration, a student is dressed inappropriately, the student will be required to change clothes or cover up inappropriate clothing before returning to classes.”


Quote:
The nature of the charge makes the incident less about the NRA shirt, and more about Marcum's behavior. In April, White defended the Marcum’s actions to the Associated Press, saying, "We at this point believe that Jared acted as mature as a 14-year-old child can act with the pressure that was put on him."


I guess the defense will argue he wasn't old enough to act mature when a police officer told him to be quiet.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  4  
Reply Tue 18 Jun, 2013 07:32 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:

That would be like a shirt which said "Chevrolet" on it but didn't have a picture of car.

If it's referring to a Chevrolet, don't you mean a picture of a car with the hood up?
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Tue 18 Jun, 2013 10:36 am
@gungasnake,
Somehow I am not ready to assume the matter is center on the NRA symbols as I remember once a young man/joker got into trouble for wearing a coke coke tee shirt when the school was having a Pepsi appreciation day in honor of Pepsi putting funds into the school for allowing them to have vending machines.

It not uncommon for schools to get upset over all kinds of dress issues up to a boys scout uniform under the crazy theory that it came under the ban on not having gang colors.
0 Replies
 
revelette
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Jun, 2013 10:24 am
He was charged with obstructing an officer, not for wearing a tee shirt with a gun on it.

Quote:
A standard dress code violation may end up costing a West Virginia 14-year-old up to a year behind bars and $500 -- all because he refused to change out of a t-shirt which displayed a rifle and the National Rifle Association logo underneath the all-caps phrase "PROTECT YOUR RIGHT" in April.

So how does "You need to change your shirt" turn into "You have the right to remain silent?" According to reports which cite police documents, then-eighth-grader Jared Marcum became confrontational after a teacher approached him during lunchtime and told him the shirt violated the dress code. He was reportedly asked several times to change into something else, but instead talked about the First Amendment and became disruptive to other students. The First Amendment includes the right to freedom of speech.

Logan City police have not responded to HLN's request for comment, but police Chief E.K. Harper told ABC News that Marcum's "conduct in school almost incited a riot." When a police officer showed up at Logan Middle School, Marcum would not stop talking, which prevented the officer from doing his job, according to WOWK. On Monday, the teenager was formally charged with obstructing an officer.
Ben White, Marcum's attorney, told ABC, "He wore [the shirt] as an expression of political speech and the need to protect the Second Amendment." The Second Amendment protects the right to keep and bear arms. However, the real legal issue at this point isn't so much the content of the shirt which sparked the incident, as it is the student's actions once confronted by school officials and police.

White doesn't think there's anything there either, telling WTRF, "Jared didn't do anything, in my view of the facts, that obstructed Officer [James] Adkins in doing his job."

The Logan County Schools dress code says that "If in the judgment of the administration, a student is dressed inappropriately, the student will be required to change clothes or cover up inappropriate clothing before returning to classes." The 14-year-old was suspended from school for one day.

source

The rules regarding dress codes seem to be pretty broad to end up meaning whatever the school thinks is inappropriate.
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Jun, 2013 10:30 am
@revelette,
Quote:
The rules regarding dress codes seem to be pretty broad to end up meaning whatever the school thinks is inappropriate.


Courts have come down on the side of student wearing objects that express a political or religion opinion from time to time at least to a limited degree.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Jun, 2013 11:12 am
@BillRM,
He wasn't arrested for what he was wearing. He was arrested for obstructing the police officer. I'm guessing he spent the entire time talking over everyone about how he had rights so the officer finally arrested him when he wouldn't shut up so other people could answer questions.
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Jun, 2013 11:18 am
@parados,
Quote:
He wasn't arrested for what he was wearing. He was arrested for obstructing the police officer. I'm guessing he spent the entire time talking over everyone about how he had rights so the officer finally arrested him when he wouldn't shut up so other people could answer questions.


Bullshit that was the excused that the police officer use to arrested him but the issue was his wearing that tee shirt and then refusing to take it off.
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Prison for an NRA T-shirt in school??
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/19/2020 at 04:56:45