Reply Tue 4 Jun, 2013 03:19 am
I replaced my kitchen ceiling fan, as it just quit working and is about 15 yrs old. I bought a new one and a friend replaced it and it also will not work. I checked the breakers and they seem to be fine. And I'm having no other problems in the house. I'm lost and not sure what to check and can't really afford to call an electrician. Any suggestions would be most appreciated. Thank you.
 
dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 4 Jun, 2013 12:25 pm
@heren916,
Using a bulb, check to determine whether there's truly power available on the exposed wires. Sometimes when a breaker appears to be on it's really off
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Jun, 2013 02:08 pm
@dalehileman,
That happens. Sometimes, flipping it off and back on will get it going.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Jun, 2013 03:04 pm
@roger,
Yea Rog, I've had that very experience, repeatedly. You'd think wouldn't you that the newer products should be getting easier to operate
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 06:44 am
@heren916,
The problem might be with the wall switch.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 01:13 pm
@heren916,
1) Use a voltmeter to check there is power on the wires leading to the fan.

2a) If there is power, hook up the fan. Ensure the wiring is correct and the fan is turned on via pull the pull cord. If the fan does not rotate try to manually rotate the blades. If the blades do not turn, look for packing material the supplier inserts in the motor housing to protect the motor.

2b) If there is no power, check the wall switch. You can carefully take the plate off the switch and use the voltmeter to check for power there. If there is no power, it is likely the breaker. If there is power, it is the wall switch.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 03:11 pm
@engineer,
Quote:
1) Use a voltmeter to check there is power on the wires leading to the fan.
It's a good idea also to apply a load of some sort, like the bulb I suggested. Occasionally you'll get a near-normal voltage reading as a result of capacitive coupling. When you then connect the fan and the voltage drops to zero, you will assume the trouble is in the fan

Quote:
2b) If there is no power, check the wall switch. You can carefully take the plate off the switch and use the voltmeter to check for power there.
In case you're not familiar with such, Heren, what Eng means here is to check for voltage from neutral to each terminal of the switch. Of course when it's on you should get the same reading for both

Often the neutral runs insulated in the wall behind the box so you have to make this connection somewhere else, such as a nearby outlet (the wider slot). Or you can connect instead to the metal frame of the switchbox. However, there's no guarantee the box is grounded
0 Replies
 
 

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