26
   

Terrorist attack in London

 
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 01:34 am
@glitterbag,
Well said.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 02:24 am
@glitterbag,
Thanks Glitterbag, it's good to know that there are some Americans who are concerned about the death of a British serviceman.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 02:27 am
@OmSigDAVID,
As usual, you are delusional (there's no "selected militia") and you indulge your polemic rather than either reality or good sense. Conservatives attempt to introduce religion into government, that's why they're called the religious right. There really is no point in discussing these things with you, because you introduce terms which don't appear in the constitution, and you define terms to suit your polemic.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 08:10 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
Thanks Glitterbag, it's good to know that there are some Americans who are concerned about the death of a British serviceman.


Have you noticed, Izzy, how A2K was saturated with coverage for Boston, threads popping up all over, the weeping and gnashing of teeth, hugs all around, pats on the back all around about how resilient and strong we all are as we dove for cover and let the Gestapo strong, with their armored vehicles and 3000 storm troopers hunt down a badly wounded teenager.?

For Woolwich, it was a huge MEH.

Wouldn't it be nice to know that there are real people who are equally concerned about the deaths of hundreds of thousands of as innocent or more so, Afghans and Iraqis?

You know full well that Woolwich, 9-11, 7-7, never would have happened if the UK hadn't committed the war crimes, the terrorist acts against people in the ME.
saab
 
  2  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 09:34 am
@JTT,
You blame everything what is going on in Irac and Afghanistan on the USA and GB.
How many in these countries are killed by their own fanatic people!
Suiced bombers!! Girls are killed in Afghanistan just because they go to school.
Men and women are stoned to death.
A woman who gets pregnant after rape has to marry the rapist.
Of Afghanistan´s 23million maybe 0.3% are Christian, 84% are sunnimuslems and 15% shiamuslems
To be an open christian is not allowed according to Taliban. To convert to another religion can mean death. Taliban also discriminate Shiamuslems and is assulting them if they do not follow the rules of Taliban regarding the Sharia laws-
Any Afghan who converts to Christianity or Judism will be killed

As long as we try to find excuses in form of frustration or whatever for any one who spreads terror we are indirectly supporting Taliban and their ideas.
Ideas which make life very very difficult in these country.

Don´t forget the majority of Muslims living in Western countries are also very very much against the terror from a small group.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 10:29 am
@saab,
Quote:
You blame everything what is going on in Irac and Afghanistan on the USA and GB.


No, Saab, I most certainly do not do this. I blame the US and the UK [and others] for committing the war crimes that they alone have committed, for the acts of terrorism that they alone have committed.

The US and the UK illegally invaded those two countries. Those invasions were of the same nature as Nazi Germany's invasions of countries in WWII. They broke international law, the same crimes that Germans and Japanese were imprisoned and hung for.

Quote:
How many in these countries are killed by their own fanatic people!
Suiced bombers!! Girls are killed in Afghanistan just because they go to school.
Men and women are stoned to death.


A lot of this is pure US propaganda, Saab. The US actually supported some of the most vicious Afghan fanatics. Read this one article. It illustrates clearly how the US didn't care at all about the people of Afghanistan. The US only cares about making sure that American business interests are made safe.

The US created and supported the Taliban.


Quote:

http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/Afghanistan/Afghanistan_CIA_Taliban.html

Afghanistan, the CIA, bin Laden,
and the Taliban

by Phil Gasper

...

But not only is Washington attacking one of the poorest countries in the world, past U.S. government actions are in no small part responsible for the current situation in Afghanistan. The Bush administration claims to be targeting Osama bin Laden, who it says masterminded the September 11 terror attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon (even though it has offered no concrete evidence to back up this accusation), and Afghanistan's Taliban government, which is sheltering him. But as the Economist magazine noted soon after September 11, " [U.S.] policies in Afghanistan a decade and more ago helped to create both Osama bin Laden and the fundamentalist Taliban regime that shelters him." An examination of this history will reveal the extent to which U.S. foreign policy is based on hypocrisy, realpolitik, and the short-term pursuit of narrow interests.



The US and the UK didn't give a rat's ass about these things happening until the Taliban told the US that they were not getting the economic concessions the US wanted.

Quote:
The CIA's anticommunist jihad

President Jimmy Carter immediately declared that the invasion jeopardized vital U.S. interests, because the Persian Gulf area was "now threatened by Soviet troops in Afghanistan. But the Carter administration's public outrage at Russian intervention in Afghanistan was doubly duplicitous. Not only was it used as an excuse for a program of increased military expenditure that had in fact already begun, but the U.S. had in fact been aiding the mujahideen for at least the previous six months, with precisely the hope of provoking a Soviet response. Former CIA director Robert Gates later admitted in his memoirs that aid to the rebels began in June 1979. In a candid 1998 interview, Zbigniew Brezinski, Carter's national security adviser, confirmed that U.S. aid to the rebels began before the invasion:

According to the official version of history, CIA aid to the mujahideen began during 1980, that is to say, after the Soviet army invaded Afghanistan [in] December 1979. But the reality, secretly guarded until now, is completely otherwise: indeed, it was July 3, 1979, that President Carter signed the first directive for secret aid to the opponents of the pro-Soviet regime in Kabul. And that very day, I wrote a note to the president in which I explained to him that in my opinion this aid was going to induce a Soviet military intervention.... We didn't push the Russians to intervene, but we knowingly increased the probability that they would....

That secret operation was an excellent idea. It had the effect of drawing the Russians into the Afghan trap.... The day that the Soviets officially crossed the border, I wrote to President Carter: We now have the opportunity of giving to the USSR its Vietnam War."

The Carter administration was well aware that in backing the mujahideen it was supporting forces with reactionary social goals, but this was outweighed by its own geopolitical interests. In August 1979, a classified State Department report bluntly asserted that "the United States' larger interest...would be served by the demise of the Taraki-Amin regime, despite whatever setbacks this might mean for future social and economic reforms in Afghanistan." That same month, in a stunning display of hypocrisy, State Department spokesperson Hodding Carter piously announced that the U.S. "expect[s] the principle of nonintervention to be respected by all parties in the area, including the Soviet Union."

The Russian invasion in December was the signal for U.S. support to the Afghan rebels to increase dramatically.

Three weeks after Soviet tanks rolled into Kabul, Carter's secretary of defense, Harold Brown, was in Beijing arranging for a weapons transfer from the Chinese to the ClA-backed Afghani troops mustered in Pakistan. The Chinese, who were generously compensated for the deal, agreed and even consented to send military advisers. Brown worked out a similar arrangement with Egypt to buy $15 million worth of weapons. "The U.S. contacted me," [then-Egyptian president] Anwar Sadat recalled shortly before his assassination [in 1981]. "They told me, 'Please open your stores for us so that we can give the Afghans the armaments they need to fight.' And I gave them the armaments. The transport of arms to the Afghans started from Cairo on U.S. planes."

By February 1980, the Washington Post reported that the mujahideen was receiving arms coming from the U.S. government.

The objective of the intervention, as spelled out by Brezinski, was to trap the Soviets in a long and costly war designed to drain their resources, just as Vietnam had bled the United States. The high level of civilian casualties that this would certainly entail was considered but set aside. According to one senior official, "The question here was whether it was morally acceptable that, in order to keep the Soviets off balance, which was the reason for the operation, it was permissible to use other lives for our geopolitical interests." Carter's CIA director Stansfield Turner answered the question: "I decided I could live with that." According to Representative Charles Wilson, a Texas Democrat,

There were 58,000 dead in Vietnam and we owe the Russians one.... I have a slight obsession with it, because of Vietnam. I thought the Soviets ought to get a dose of it.... I've been of the opinion that this money was better spent to hurt our adversaries than other money in the Defense Department budget.

The mujahideen consisted of at least seven factions, who often fought amongst themselves in their battle for territory and control of the opium trade. To hurt the Russians, the U.S. deliberately chose to give the most support to the most extreme groups. A disproportionate share of U.S. arms went to Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, "a particularly fanatical fundamentalist and woman-hater."' According to journalist Tim Weiner, " [Hekmatyar's] followers first gained attention by throwing acid in the faces of women who refused to wear the veil. CIA and State Department officials I have spoken with call him 'scary,' 'vicious,' 'a fascist,' 'definite dictatorship material."

There was, though, a kind of method in the madness: Brezinski hoped not just to drive the Russians out of Afghanistan, but to ferment unrest within the Soviet Union itself. His plan, says author Dilip Hiro, was "to export a composite ideology of nationalism and Islam to the Muslim-majority Central Asian states and Soviet Republics with a view to destroying the Soviet order." Looking back in 1998, Brezinski had no regrets. "What was more important in the world view of history?... A few stirred-up Muslims or the liberation of Central Europe and the end of the Cold War>"

Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 10:44 am
@izzythepush,
Hilarious! and sad...
deric
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 10:45 am
@neologist,
I wonder how often uch race is a motivation for conversion to Islam. As in I'm hated by whites so I'm separating and going in this direction. Also how often is a terrorist looking for a cause,something to give a big meaning to his/her life. In these cases then the organization they stand for is just a mask.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 10:46 am
@saab,
So it is American propagande when i Sweden a father or brother kills his daughter or sister because she has some western habits? So it is American propaganda when we have Iraqui refugees in Sweden who can tell about what is going on.
In Malmö Jews are attacked in certain areas...it is certainly not Swedes doing it.
We do have journalists who can think all by themselves and who have seen things happening.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 10:58 am
@saab,
Quote:
So it is American propagande when i Sweden a father or brother kills his daughter or sister because she has some western habits? So it is American propaganda when we have Iraqui refugees in Sweden who can tell about what is going on.
In Malmö Jews are attacked in certain areas...it is certainly not Swedes doing it.


These incidents have nothing to do with the issue YOU raised. These Swedish incidents have nothing at all to do with the facts that I have pointed out to you, Saab. The US and the UK used, in the most despicable and greedy manner possible, the people of Afghanistan [not to mention Iraq, Iran, ...] to line their own pockets.

I've shown you that the US, in their own words, had no problem causing the deaths of millions, had no problem delivering the people of Afghanistan into the hands of the vicious people that the US and UK created, the ones you are complaining about, the Taliban and mujahideen.

Quote:
The U.S. government was well aware of the Taliban's reactionary [vicious] program, yet it chose to back their rise to power in the mid-1990s. The creation of the Taliban was "actively encouraged by the ISI and the CIA," according to Selig Harrison, an expert on U.S. relations with Asia. "The United States encouraged Saudi Arabia and Pakistan to support the Taliban, certainly right up to their advance on Kabul," adds respected journalist Ahmed Rashid.

When the Taliban took power, State Department spokesperson Glyn Davies said that he saw "nothing objectionable" in the Taliban's plans to impose strict Islamic law, and Senator Hank Brown, chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on the Near East and South Asia, welcomed the new regime:

"The good part of what has happened is that one of the factions at last seems capable of developing a new government in Afghanistan." "The Taliban will probably develop like the Saudis. There will be Aramco [the consortium of oil companies that controlled Saudi oil], pipelines, an emir, no parliament and lots of Sharia law. We can live with that," said another U.S. diplomat in 1997.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 11:03 am
@deric,
Quote:
I wonder how often uch race is a motivation for conversion to Islam. As in I'm hated by whites so I'm separating and going in this direction. Also how often is a terrorist looking for a cause,something to give a big meaning to his/her life. In these cases then the organization they stand for is just a mask.[/quote

Don't you think that trying to force the war criminals and terrorists, ie. the US & the UK, out of Afghanistan is a worthwhile cause, Deric?
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 11:08 am
@Ceili,
There's much much more that lies unspoken that is much much sadder, Ceili.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 11:39 am
"Terrorist" attack in London?

Excellent article.

Quote:

Was the London killing of a British soldier 'terrorism'?

What definition of the term includes this horrific act of violence but excludes the acts of the US, the UK and its allies?


Glenn Greenwald
guardian.co.uk, Thursday 23 May 2013 14.03 BST


Two men yesterday engaged in a horrific act of violence on the streets of London by using what appeared to be a meat cleaver to hack to death a British soldier. In the wake of claims that the assailants shouted "Allahu Akbar" during the killing, and a video showing one of the assailants citing Islam as well as a desire to avenge and stop continuous UK violence against Muslims, media outlets (including the Guardian) and British politicians instantly characterized the attack as "terrorism".

That this was a barbaric and horrendous act goes without saying, but given the legal, military, cultural and political significance of the term "terrorism", it is vital to ask: is that term really applicable to this act of violence? To begin with, in order for an act of violence to be "terrorism", many argue that it must deliberately target civilians. That's the most common means used by those who try to distinguish the violence engaged in by western nations from that used by the "terrorists": sure, we kill civilians sometimes, but we don't deliberately target them the way the "terrorists" do.

But here, just as was true for Nidal Hasan's attack on a Fort Hood military base, the victim of the violence was a soldier of a nation at war, not a civilian. He was stationed at an army barracks quite close to the attack. The killer made clear that he knew he had attacked a soldier when he said afterward: "this British soldier is an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth."

The US, the UK and its allies have repeatedly killed Muslim civilians over the past decade (and before that), but defenders of those governments insist that this cannot be "terrorism" because it is combatants, not civilians, who are the targets. Can it really be the case that when western nations continuously kill Muslim civilians, that's not "terrorism", but when Muslims kill western soldiers, that is terrorism? Amazingly, the US has even imprisoned people at Guantanamo and elsewhere on accusations of "terrorism" who are accused of nothing more than engaging in violence against US soldiers who invaded their country.

It's true that the soldier who was killed yesterday was out of uniform and not engaged in combat at the time he was attacked. But the same is true for the vast bulk of killings carried out by the US and its allies over the last decade, where people are killed in their homes, in their cars, at work, while asleep (in fact, the US has re-defined "militant" to mean "any military-aged male in a strike zone"). Indeed, at a recent Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on drone killings, Gen. James Cartwright and Sen. Lindsey Graham both agreed that the US has the right to kill its enemies even while they are "asleep", that you don't "have to wake them up before you shoot them" and "make it a fair fight". Once you declare that the "entire globe is a battlefield" (which includes London) and that any "combatant" (defined as broadly as possible) is fair game to be killed - as the US has done - then how can the killing of a solider of a nation engaged in that war, horrific though it is, possibly be "terrorism"?

When I asked on Twitter this morning what specific attributes of this attack make it "terrorism" given that it was a soldier who was killed, the most frequent answer I received was that "terrorism" means any act of violence designed to achieve political change, or more specifically, to induce a civilian population to change their government or its policies of out fear of violence. Because, this line of reasoning went, one of the attackers here said that "the only reasons we killed this man is because Muslims are dying daily" and warned that "you people will never be safe. Remove your government", the intent of the violence was to induce political change, thus making it "terrorism".

That is at least a coherent definition. But doesn't that then encompass the vast majority of violent acts undertaken by the US and its allies over the last decade? What was the US/UK "shock and awe" attack on Baghdad if not a campaign to intimidate the population with a massive show of violence into submitting to the invading armies and ceasing their support for Saddam's regime? That was clearly its functional intent and even its stated intent. That definition would also immediately include the massive air bombings of German cities during World War II. It would include the Central American civilian-slaughtering militias supported, funded and armed by the Reagan administration throughout the 1980s, the Bangledeshi death squads trained and funded by the UK, and countless other groups supported by the west that used violence against civilians to achieve political ends.

The ongoing US drone attacks unquestionably have the effect, and one could reasonably argue the intent, of terrorizing the local populations so that they cease harboring or supporting those the west deems to be enemies. The brutal sanctions regime imposed by the west on Iraq and Iran, which kills large numbers of people, clearly has the intent of terrorizing the population into changing its governments' policies and even the government itself. How can one create a definition of "terrorism" that includes Wednesday's London attack on this British soldier without including many acts of violence undertaken by the US, the UK and its allies and partners? Can that be done?

I know this vital caveat will fall on deaf ears for some, but nothing about this discussion has anything to do with justifiability. An act can be vile, evil, and devoid of justification without being "terrorism": indeed, most of the worst atrocities of the 20th Century, from the Holocaust to the wanton slaughter of Stalin and Pol Pot and the massive destruction of human life in Vietnam, are not typically described as "terrorism". To question whether something qualifies as "terrorism" is not remotely to justify or even mitigate it. That should go without saying, though I know it doesn't.

The reason it's so crucial to ask this question is that there are few terms - if there are any - that pack the political, cultural and emotional punch that "terrorism" provides. When it comes to the actions of western governments, it is a conversation-stopper, justifying virtually anything those governments want to do. It's a term that is used to start wars, engage in sustained military action, send people to prison for decades or life, to target suspects for due-process-free execution, shield government actions behind a wall of secrecy, and instantly shape public perceptions around the world. It matters what the definition of the term is, or whether there is a consistent and coherent definition. It matters a great deal.

There is ample scholarship proving that the term has no such clear or consistently applied meaning (see the penultimate section here, and my interview with Remi Brulin here). It is very hard to escape the conclusion that, operationally, the term has no real definition at this point beyond "violence engaged in by Muslims in retaliation against western violence toward Muslims". When media reports yesterday began saying that "there are indications that this may be act of terror", it seems clear that what was really meant was: "there are indications that the perpetrators were Muslims driven by political grievances against the west" (earlier this month, an elderly British Muslim was stabbed to death in an apparent anti-Muslim hate crime and nobody called that "terrorism"). Put another way, the term at this point seems to have no function other than propagandistically and legally legitimizing the violence of western states against Muslims while delegitimizing any and all violence done in return to those states.

One last point: in the wake of the Boston Marathon attacks, I documented that the perpetrators of virtually every recent attempted and successful "terrorist" attack against the west cited as their motive the continuous violence by western states against Muslim civilians. It's certainly true that Islam plays an important role in making these individuals willing to fight and die for this perceived just cause (just as Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, and nationalism lead some people to be willing to fight and die for their cause). But the proximate cause of these attacks are plainly political grievances: namely, the belief that engaging in violence against aggressive western nations is the only way to deter and/or avenge western violence that kills Muslim civilians.

Add the London knife attack on this soldier to that growing list. One of the perpetrators said on camera that "the only reason we killed this man is because Muslims are dying daily" and "we apologize that women had to see this today, but in our lands our women have to see the same." As I've endlessly pointed out, highlighting this causation doesn't remotely justify the acts. But it should make it anything other than surprising. On Twitter last night, Michael Moore sardonically summarized western reaction to the London killing this way:

I am outraged that we can't kill people in other counties without them trying to kill us!"


Basic human nature simply does not allow you to cheer on your government as it carries out massive violence in multiple countries around the world and then have you be completely immune from having that violence returned.

...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/23/woolwich-attack-terrorism-blowback
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 12:46 pm
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:
Sad thing is I also understand the terrorists' frustration.

What's to understand?

They want to conquer the world, abolish freedom and democracy, abolish women's rights, and commit genocide against all non-Muslims. They want to achieve that through the large-scale massacre of innocent civilians.

They are frustrated because no one will allow them to do any of that.
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 01:23 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
izzythepush wrote:
David, far right means the Nazis and their ilk, I don't need to explain the nomenclature, it's common currency.

Agreed that u don't need
to answer questions addressed to u in the forum.
Agreed that it is "common currency" but its logic
is not functional; I was bringing out that point.

( Y call it "right"?? Y not call it yellowish, or downward, or northeasterly, or Sylvester?? Y "right" ?? )

People are naturally eager to express opposition to those who disagree with them. But some people are not intelligent enough to form coherent arguments. People who are both leftist and stupid will often falsely accuse the right of being associated with the Nazis because they are not smart enough to say anything else.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 01:25 pm
@oralloy,
Don't just vote down these transparent lies, address them head on, folks. That's the only way to stop the spread of this insidious propaganda.

The quote below, Oralloy, is from a leading US constitutional scholar. You certainly have gall, trying to advance these vicious lies, right after I post an article that you completely ignored [probably didn't even read it].

Compare his credentials to yours.


Quote:
Basic human nature simply does not allow you to cheer on your government as it carries out massive violence in multiple countries around the world and then have you be completely immune from having that violence returned.

...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/23/woolwich-attack-terrorism-blowback
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 01:27 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:
The UK, US poodles,

Nonsense. The UK are their own independent country. They are allied with us because of our shared values of democracy and human rights.



JTT wrote:
have been regularly killing innocents around the world. Certainly nowhere near the numbers that the US has slaughtered but more than enough to understand that it would make these young men angry enough to retaliate.

If they didn't want us to defend ourselves, they shouldn't have been killing us. We tend to defend ourselves when people start killing us.



JTT wrote:
How would his retaliation be any different from the UK/US illegal invasion of Afghanistan?

There is nothing illegal about our invasion of Afghanistan.

The terrorists differ from us in the following ways:

• The terrorists are the aggressors. We are merely defending ourselves.

• The terrorists intentionally target civilians. We do not.

• The terrorists seek to eliminate freedom, democracy and women's rights. We seek to make these values universal.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 01:41 pm
@oralloy,
Quote:
They want to conquer the world, abolish freedom and democracy, abolish women's rights, and commit genocide against all non-Muslims. They want to achieve that through the large-scale massacre of innocent civilians.


Quote:
But some people are not intelligent enough to form coherent arguments.


The first quote is a common US meme, a way, way old bit of US propaganda that "people [who] are not intelligent enough to form coherent arguments" throw out all the time.

This silly notion is preposterous. Sure, Afghanistan or Libya or Guatemala or {___} is going to invade and conquer the US superpower. It's as big a lie now as it has always been.

To show just how ludicrous a notion it is:

"If we publicly declare that Cuba is a threat to our security, 40 million Mexicans will die laughing."

– Mexican ambassador to the United States, in response to the Kennedy administration's 1961 call to collective action against Cuba.

But way way way too many Americans continually swallow this nonsense fed to them by their governments and media. Again, one has to wonder what mental defect it is that plagues Americans.

oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 02:14 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:
Don't just vote down these transparent lies, address them head on, folks. That's the only way to stop the spread of this insidious propaganda.

The fact that I am telling the absolute truth makes it rather difficult to address my posts head on.



JTT wrote:
The quote below, Oralloy, is from a leading US constitutional scholar. You certainly have gall, trying to advance these vicious lies, right after I post an article that you completely ignored [probably didn't even read it].

I probably haven't gotten to it yet. I'm answering posts from page 4 right now.

And I need to take a break and do other things soon. It probably won't be until much later tonight that I can sit down and plow through all the posts to get caught up.



JTT wrote:
Compare his credentials to yours.

I don't care much about his credentials. If the guy is capable of making a point, it will show up in his argument.



JTT wrote:
Quote:
Basic human nature simply does not allow you to cheer on your government as it carries out massive violence in multiple countries around the world and then have you be completely immune from having that violence returned.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/23/woolwich-attack-terrorism-blowback

I note the fact that the terrorists are the aggressors, and we are the ones who are merely "returning the violence" (i.e. defending ourselves).

The guy's main argument seems to be that since these people attacked a soldier instead of a civilian, they are not terrorists.

Fair enough. They are unlawful combatants.

Being an unlawful combatant is a capital offense. I know the UK abolished the death penalty for civilian justice, but did they also abolish it for wartime matters?
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 25 May, 2013 02:18 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:
This silly notion is preposterous. Sure, Afghanistan or Libya or Guatemala or {___} is going to invade and conquer the US superpower. It's as big a lie now as it has always been.

The fact that the terrorists' goals are unlikely to succeed does not change the reality of what their goals are.
0 Replies
 
 

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