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Terrorist attack in London

 
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Jun, 2013 08:50 pm
@wandeljw,
Quote:
Whenever a radical Islamist commits a horrific act of violence or an act of terrorism, Glenn Greenwald is there with the same all-powerful explanation: it is our fault. More specifically, it is the fault of anyone living in the United States or any “loyal, constant ally” state, as he put it on Twitter. Terrorists, it seems, have no agency.


If you want to ensure that you keep your job at a top NY law firm and you get invited to all the right parties, marry the right girl, climb up the ladder so that one day you get to be part of the top terrorist group in the world, you write what you wrote.

If, however, ya were willing to take an honest look at history, Zack, there is simply no other conclusion to reach; 9-11, 7-7, Boston, Woolwich, ... simply would never have happened if the US and UK were not engaging in terrorist actions/frequent war crimes around the world.

As Will said;

When you give a lesson in meanness to a critter or a person, don't be surprised if they learn their lesson.

You can always tell, Zack, [Wandel] when something is true. No one wants to discuss it. Like you didn't in your article, Zack.

0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  4  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 06:53 am
Quote:
Michael Adebolajo's dangerous ignorance about Afghanistan
(Richard Kemp, The Guardian, 24 May 2013)

Michael Adebolajo, the knife-wielding, blood-soaked brute who is suspected of killing Drummer Lee Rigby told passersby he was fed up with people killing Muslims in Afghanistan. If that was the reason for Wednesday's attack on Drummer Lee Rigby, Adebolajo should have travelled to Helmand and started wielding his knife against Taliban fighters. It is they who kill most Muslims in Afghanistan.

According to the United Nations, 81% of civilian casualties were inflicted by the Taliban and their bedfellows in 2012, with only 8% caused by Afghan and coalition forces. This is roughly the pattern of previous years too. The overwhelming majority of the Taliban's victims were the result of deliberate targeting and indiscriminate use of improvised explosive devices and suicide attacks, some carried out by children.

Adebolajo seemingly has a track record with the group that loudly accused my own regiment, the Royal Anglians, of being child killers and "butchers of Basra" during a march through Luton to honour their return from Iraq in 2010. A regiment that had completed its six-month tour of duty without firing a shot in anger, and had protected many Iraqi Muslims from the depredations of extremist killers.

Of course, Iraq, Afghanistan and the "defence" of their brother Muslims in far-off lands are nothing more than feeble excuses for Islamists who follow al-Qaida's murderous agenda. Al-Qaida's earlier bombing campaigns in the 1990s – during which far more Muslims were killed than the westerners they were targeting – and 9/11 obviously pre-date the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts.

Their agenda is far wider. It is to remove western presence and influence from Islamic lands, impose fundamental theocratic rule on all Muslim countries and unite them under a restored Sunni caliphate as imagined from centuries past.

Al-Qaida does not see this as a short-term project, but one that will be achieved only in generations to come. Its role is to drive inexorably towards this goal by mass killings intended to set community against community, and to gradually undermine the existing order through violence and economic destruction.

Al-Qaida's war will not end when Nato forces leave Afghanistan. Neither will its campaign in Britain. If anything, terrorist attacks here could increase. In Helmand, British soldiers have encountered Taliban fighters with Birmingham accents and bodies with Manchester United tattoos. Many British Muslims have travelled to Afghanistan for jihad. If that option reduces after 2014, some might turn their murderous attentions on their homeland.

That was true of Parviz Khan, a Birmingham man who was prevented from travelling abroad to fight and instead hatched a plot in 2007 to kidnap and behead a British soldier here at home.

Ironically, the rudimentary attack in Woolwich may be the result of increasing success by British and international security forces against Islamist terror networks and cells set up to execute more sophisticated plots. MI5 has thwarted dozens of serious terrorist plans here in the UK since 2001. Only last month, 24 people were convicted of terrorism-related offences in British courts. Al-Qaida Central, whose hand was previously behind many attack plans in Britain, has been sent reeling by wave after wave of highly effective US drone strikes in the Pakistan border areas, and are now in virtual survival mode.

Anwar al-Awlaki, an English-speaking al-Qaida leader, was the inspiration behind many recent terror plots in the UK. It is possible that the Woolwich killers were motivated by his exhortations to Muslims everywhere to launch whatever attacks they could with whatever weapons they had to hand. Though Awlaki's message continues to resonate among his followers, he was fortunately silenced by a US drone strike in Yemen in September 2011.

There are unfortunately many more Awlakis out there. The continuing threat from Islamist terrorism shows how urgent it is that the government finds ways of shutting down the preachers of hate both here in Britain and on the internet. These mind-benders, who seek out the compliant and the vulnerable, are every bit as culpable as those who wield the knife or plant the bomb at their behest.

We don't yet know whether Rigby's murderers were acting alone, but their attack required little planning, no finance, no support network and no special expertise other than merciless bloodlust. With few opportunities to collect intelligence via planning and communications, these are the most difficult terrorist attacks for our security services to prevent.

Yet it seems that both suspects had previously been on MI5's radar. It is not the first time that the activities of those on the periphery of extremism have been disregarded by the security service, only to emerge in serious terrorist plots. Mohammad Sidique Khan, the leader of the 2005 London suicide attacks, is a case in point. But the police and security service have to prioritise their operations against finite resources. The Woolwich attack raises the question: is increased funding needed to widen their net in an ever-evolving war on terror that has many decades yet to run?
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 07:47 am
@wandeljw,
From your source.

Quote:
Yet it seems that both suspects had previously been on MI5's radar. It is not the first time that the activities of those on the periphery of extremism have been disregarded by the security service, only to emerge in serious terrorist plots. Mohammad Sidique Khan, the leader of the 2005 London suicide attacks, is a case in point. But the police and security service have to prioritise their operations against finite resources. The Woolwich attack raises the question: is increased funding needed to widen their net in an ever-evolving war on terror that has many decades yet to run?


If you look at the amount of plots thwarted by our security forces over the last decade or so, you can't blame them too much for letting one slip through. 7/7 was the last such attack, that's almost six years without incident.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 11:40 am
@wandeljw,
Jesus, Wandel, Richard Kemp, one of the top war criminals in the illegal invasion of Afghanistan makes excuses for his war crimes.

Richard Kemp's [WandelJW's ] dangerous ignorance about Afghanistan

Quote:

http://www.alternet.org/story/93473/afghanistan%3A_the_other_illegal_war

Afghanistan: The Other Illegal War
The U.S. invasion of Afghanistan was every bit as illegal as the invasion of Iraq. Why, then, do so many Americans see it as justifiable?

...

The U.N. Charter provides that all member states must settle their international disputes by peaceful means, and no nation can use military force except in self-defense or when authorized by the Security Council. After the 9/11 attacks, the council passed two resolutions, neither of which authorized the use of military force in Afghanistan. Resolutions 1368 and 1373 condemned the Sept. 11 attacks and ordered the freezing of assets; the criminalizing of terrorist activity; the prevention of the commission of and support for terrorist attacks; and the taking of necessary steps to prevent the commission of terrorist activity, including the sharing of information. In addition, it urged ratification and enforcement of the international conventions against terrorism.

The invasion of Afghanistan was not legitimate self-defense under article 51 of the charter because the attacks on Sept. 11 were criminal attacks, not "armed attacks" by another country. Afghanistan did not attack the United States. In fact, 15 of the 19 hijackers came from Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, there was not an imminent threat of an armed attack on the United States after Sept. 11, or Bush would not have waited three weeks before initiating his October 2001 bombing campaign. The necessity for self-defense must be "instant, overwhelming, leaving no choice of means, and no moment for deliberation." This classic principle of self-defense in international law has been affirmed by the Nuremberg Tribunal and the U.N. General Assembly.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 11:44 am
@izzythepush,
You're still avoiding the reason these attacks take place, Izzy. Why are you such an apologist for UK war crimes but you are so against Israel's crimes?
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 12:25 pm

I wish that the victim
had been better armed in his own defense, b4 he was decapitated.
Then the Moslems wud have lost.





David
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 12:28 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Go change your Depends, Siggy.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 02:28 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:


I wish that the victim
had been better armed in his own defense,


He was run over then set upon, having a gun would have made no difference.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 04:51 pm
@izzythepush,

OmSigDAVID wrote:


I wish that the victim
had been better armed in his own defense,
izzythepush wrote:
He was run over then set upon,
having a gun would have made no difference.
Did he tell u that ?

Be alert, Izzy !
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 05:27 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
There were a lot, and I mean a lot, of eye witnesses.

OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 06:17 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:
There were a lot, and I mean a lot, of eye witnesses.
Do thay know for a fact
that he was not able to aim a handgun ??
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 06:19 pm
@izzythepush,
I knew a lady who was hit by a car.

She cud have aimed a handgun (with the arm that was not broken).

(Is that unique to AMERICANS ?)
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Jun, 2013 02:55 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I think you're playing fast and loose with reality here. The witnesses initially thought they were coming to his assistance, so it's likely to assume he probably thought the same thing.

Not only that , if you get hit by a car you're going to be in shock, at least for the first few minutes.

Instead of automatically assuming you're right, try looking at the facts to see if they square up with your hypothesis.
OmSigDAVID
 
  3  
Reply Mon 3 Jun, 2013 03:39 pm
@izzythepush,
I have a hunch that the English know
that if someone rams them with a car, thay r not his friend.





David
0 Replies
 
 

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