5
   

Super mosquito set to invade Florida

 
 
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 05:35 am
http://www.myfoxorlando.com/story/21554128/mega-mosquito-galinipper-could-invade-florida-this-summer

http://wofl.images.worldnow.com/images/21554128_BG1.jpg

Quote:
....Being bitten by a galinipper "feels like you're being stabbed," said Pelaez, who has been bitten countless times by the galinipper while working for several years in the Amazon.

"This summer it's very important to wear lots of mosquito repellent if you don't want to get bitten by the galinipper," Pelaez said.

Read more: http://www.myfoxorlando.com/story/21554128/mega-mosquito-galinipper-could-invade-florida-this-summer#ixzz2N2bLJNTO


Again for any who might have missed it, the answer to this and every other kind of similar problem was right there in 1950. They all but had polio, malario, bed-bugs and everything else like that wiped off the planet by 1957 and that was too good for the idiots.

http://junkscience.com/ddt/

http://townhall.com/columnists/ashleyherzog/2008/04/22/an_environmental_failure_restrictions_on_ddt

Quote:
I might take the environmental movement seriously if it weren’t responsible for millions of deaths. On Tuesday, the world observed Earth Day—a celebration of the movement’s alleged successes, one of which is worldwide restrictions on the insecticide DDT.

Environmentalists in the U.S. and Europe might be congratulating themselves for nearly ridding the Earth of DDT, but the people of South America, Asia and Africa are not celebrating....


http://junksciencearchive.com/ddtfaq.html

Nobody is suggesting that anybody bring back the gigantic use of DDT as an area pesticide for crops which was going on in the 1950s. But the idea of banning its use to protect human habitat areas and attack mosquito breeding grounds was and remains insane.

 
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 06:20 am
@gungasnake,
was wondering when youd begin your annual gibberish campaign for DDT.
SInce DDT does have several proven "shortcomings" and its another fact that insects quickly develop resistance and then immunity to organo chlorines, hundreds of new compounds and biologicals have been developed since the 1930's
Maybe you should start rallying for Atrazine, since weve gradually begun downuse of this ag chemical too in favor of safer compounds.
0 Replies
 
Ice Demon
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 06:32 am
@gungasnake,
Finally a worthy foe, a foe worthy enough that when slapped will slap back, but still not what I desire.
Anyway, DDT can be synthesized in your home if you can get your hands on chloral hydrate. Third world countries still use DDT & Chlordane today to fight vector borne disease.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 09:06 am
@Ice Demon,
thats true, but DDT is not the only pesticide out there. It rapidly loses effectiveness as the many countries that still use it, also use it agricultiurally and so the bugs becomne immune, and in fact, thrive on it.

Integrated Pest Management is the way to go, that way the whole life cycle of other animals isnt fucked up because of DDE and DDT
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 09:32 am
From the DDT FAQ:

Quote:
Discovered by accident, DDT became one of the greatest public health tools of the 20th century. Overuse harmed its efficacy -- and made it politically unpopular.


Dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) was first synthesized, for no purpose, in 1874 by German chemist Othmar Zeidler. In 1939, Dr. Paul Müller independently produced DDT. Müller found that DDT quickly killed flies, aphids, mosquitoes, walking sticks and Colorado potato beetles. Müller and the Geigy corporation patented DDT in Switzerland (1940), England (1942) and U.S. (1943).

The first large-scale use of DDT occurred in 1943 when 500 gallons of DDT were produced by Merck & Company and delivered to Italy to help squelch a rapidly spreading epidemic of louse-borne typhus. Later in 1943, the U.S. Army issued small tin boxes of 10 percent DDT dust to its soldiers around the world who used it to kill body lice, head lice and crab lice.

Müller won the Nobel Prize in 1948 for his work on DDT.

Peak usage occurred in 1962, when 80 million kilograms of DDT were used and 82 million kilograms produced.

"In May 1955 the Eighth World Health Assembly adopted a Global Malaria Eradication Campaign based on the widespread use of DDT against mosquitos and of antimalarial drugs to treat malaria and to eliminate the parasite in humans. As a result of the Campaign, malaria was eradicated by 1967 from all developed countries where the disease was endemic and large areas of tropical Asia and Latin America were freed from the risk of infection. The Malaria Eradication Campaign was only launched in three countries of tropical Africa since it was not considered feasible in the others. Despite these achievements, improvements in the malaria situation could not be maintained indefinitely by time-limited, highly prescriptive and centralized programmes."

[Bull World Health Organ 1998;76(1):11-6]

"To only a few chemicals does man owe as great a debt as to DDT... In little more than two decades, DDT has prevented 500 million human deaths, due to malaria, that otherwise would have been inevitable."

[National Academy of Sciences, Committee on Research in the Life Sciences of the Committee on Science and Public Policy. 1970. The Life Sciences; Recent Progress and Application to Human Affairs; The World of Biological Research; Requirements for the Future.]

It is believed that [malaria] afflicts between 300 and 500 million every year, causing up to 2.7 million deaths, mainly among children under five years.

[Africa News, January 27, 1999]

Some mosquitoes became "resistant" to DDT. "There is persuasive evidence that antimalarial operations did not produce mosquito resistance to DDT. That crime, and in a very real sense it was a crime, can be laid to the intemperate and inappropriate use of DDT by farmers, espeially cotton growers. They used the insecticide at levels that would accelerate, if not actually induce, the selection of a resistant population of mosquitoes."

[Desowitz, RS. 1992. Malaria Capers, W.W. Norton & Company]

"Resistance" may be a misleading term when discussing DDT and mosquitoes. While some mosquitoes develop biochemical/physiological mechanisms of resistance to the chemical, DDT also can provoke strong avoidance behavior in some mosquitoes so they spend less time in areas where DDT has been applied -- this still reduces mosquito-human contact. "This avoidance behavior, exhibited when malaria vectors avoid insecticides by not entering or by rapidly exiting sprayed houses, should raise serious questions about the overall value of current physiological and biochemical resistance tests. The continued efficacy of DDT in Africa, India, Brazil, and Mexico, where 69% of all reported cases of malaria occur and where vectors are physiologically resistant to DDT (excluding Brazil), serves as one indicator that repellency is very important in preventing indoor transmission of malaria."

[See, e.g., J Am Mosq Control Assoc 1998 Dec;14(4):410-20; and Am J Trop Med Hyg 1994;50(6 Suppl):21-34]

II. Advocacy against DDT


In other words, it is not clear that anything ever developed resistance to DDT and even if anything did, it was from the gigantic misuse of DDT as an area pesticide for crops.

Those generations of bugs are gone. Used to protect human habitats and cleanse mosquito breeding grounds, the stuff would work as well today as it did in 1950.

Nothing else has ever come down the road which is close to being as cheap and as effective or as harmless to everything in the world other than insects.










0 Replies
 
Ice Demon
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 09:38 am
@farmerman,
Yes, if some of these eggs are from a strain that have already had encounters with DDT and have built resistance, I'll give it 8 to 12 months after reintroducing DDT in America before most become fully resistant. If not, maybe a decade. DDT should only be used only a long term last resort, but definitely not an environmentally safe solution.
Anyway, I don't see why people should freak out. These blood suckers are big, so they are slow flyers, and they're bigger targets for the swatter.
Worried of the painful sting? Apply a thick layer of gooey mud all over the. Problem solved, and on the upside, you'll stay cool.
Or you can just spray insect repellant. Whatever works for you.
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 09:40 am
http://townhall.com/columnists/ashleyherzog/2008/04/22/an_environmental_failure_restrictions_on_ddt/page/2

Quote:

....Under threat of trade sanctions from the West, African nations have been forced to use less effective and more expensive methods to fight the malaria epidemic, such as mosquito-repellent bed nets—which, according to World Health Organization estimates, have about a 50 percent success rate. (Countries that have reintroduced DDT, such as South Africa, have found it has a 90 percent success rate.) In any event, the DDT alternatives don’t seem to be doing much good: Every year, up to 300 million Africans get malaria, and it costs the continent’s economies billions in medical expenses and lost work days.

The situation was so dire that, in 2006, the World Health Organization announced its support for indoor DDT spraying in countries ravaged by malaria, saying the chemical had “a clean bill of health” and any possible negative effects of DDT did not outweigh its benefits. The usual suspects went nuts. As the environmentalist group the Sierra Club whined, “Studies have linked widespread reproductive disorders in animals to DDT exposure—including reproductive failure in the American Bald Eagle.” This is what happens when people start rating wildlife more worthwhile than human life.

As for DDT’s effect on humans, the claim that it causes cancer has never been proven. Some studies show a link, especially in agricultural workers who were exposed to large amounts of DDT as well as other chemicals. Others, such as one conducted by Dr. David J. Hunter of the Harvard Medical School, have found none at all. One study by the National Cancer Institute found that DDT actually reduced tumors in animals.

Others, such as writer Paul Driessen, describe the fear of DDT as a “country club anxiety,” a luxury of rich Westerners who can afford organic foods and all-natural cosmetics and clothing. They will never contract malaria. Meanwhile, Africans—many of whom are lucky to afford any food at all—have made it clear that they’re willing to accept the risk of potential side effects if it means avoiding the very real threat of malaria. Two weeks ago, Uganda initiated a program to spray houses with DDT, even though it will probably hurt their trade with the U.S. and the European Union. As Ugandan businesswoman Fiona Kobusingye told reporters, “I lost my son, two sisters and two nephews to malaria. Don’t talk to me about birds. And don’t tell me a little DDT in our bodies is worse than the risk of losing more children to this disease. African mothers would be overjoyed if that were their biggest worry.”.....
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 10:01 am
@Ice Demon,
i wonder what their life cycles are? Like the tiger mosquiotoes have been breeding in piles of tires that hold rain water (just dont make big tire dumps). If these guys breed in open water, Im sure that a nominal population will be attained because of fish predation on larvae
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 10:03 am
@gungasnake,
t post ANY science from HUFFPO, why must you only clip "science" from Conservative press, they have their own agendas which are ANTI-environmental.Doesnt take a great intelligence to find some honest to goodness (non self published) juried science about DDT and DDE
0 Replies
 
Ice Demon
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 10:29 am
@farmerman,
This species isn't really news worthy. Must be a slow news day. Repellents with DEET will definitely do a good job of repelling them, but on the off chance the persevering female bites, Psorophora ciliata are not known to carry dangerous diseases like malaria, or the West Nile virus in Florida. Urban civilians only have a very small likelihood of being in contact with these extra large blood suckers.
Ice Demon
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 10:39 am
@gungasnake,
Inform yourself will ya?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 10:46 am
"The sky is falling! The sky is falling!

-- C. Little
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 12:18 pm
@Ice Demon,
I AM informed, as are the nations which have started using DDT again despite the pain it causes to libtard pseudoscientists. YOU're the one who is misinformed.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 12:33 pm
@Ice Demon,
I see that the good side of P ciliata is that its larvae EAT the larvae of the Aedes and ANapholes etc.
I guiess the news point was that, due to the wet fall and winter, Florida will see a bump in P ciliata.

Youre right, slow news day.
Ice Demon
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 12:58 pm
@gungasnake,
Yess, yessss, let the spite flow through you.
Even if DDT doesn't have any delirious and repugnant affect on humans, it still affects the ecosystem. And ecosystems are really dangerous to mess with. Malaria medicine is cheap in case you didn't know, and DDT is not the only solution. My point is that there are better ways of defeating malaria than killing all the mosquitoes in the world.
The initial success of the DDT campaign used against malaria decreased with subsequent resistant insects emerging. In many places the initial success partly or completed reversed, and in some cases malaria actually became worse. In any case, DDT was less effective in tropical regions because of the continuous life cycle of mosquitoes and poor infrastructure. It was never used in sub-Saharan Africa for those reasons. Anyway, DDT is stil used in vector control. In many countries and regions it has lost much of its effectiveness due to developed mosquito resistance, mainly due to massive agricultural use. Whether continued use of DDT at the 1950s and 1960s levels to present day would have resulted in fewer malaria and other vector born deaths, or whether it would have made mosquitoes totally resistant to it, no one knows for sure.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 01:01 pm
Wait . . . you're attempting to reason with Gunga Dim? He's been peddling this DDT bullshit for literally years. Nothing gets through to him. While i applaud you approach, it's wasted effort.
Ice Demon
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 01:10 pm
@Setanta,
With that heads up, I can safely skip along peacefully to greener pastures. Merci Beaucoup.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 01:31 pm
@Ice Demon,
De rien . . .
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 01:43 pm
@farmerman,
What wet fall in FL? The summer months were the 10th wettest on record, but they were followed by an exceptionally dry fall.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 02:07 pm
@Ragman,
well, The news article was based upon a really wet egg laying season.
 

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