10
   

Kid wouldn't fight, died of injuries

 
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Mar, 2013 10:02 pm
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:

I've never heard of a concussion causing seizures,


You're an idiot.

Concussions in Kids

Quote:
Even without a loss of consciousness, it's important to watch for symptoms of a concussion.

Common initial symptoms include:

a change in level of alertness
extreme sleepiness
a bad headache
confusion
repeated vomiting
seizure
0 Replies
 
Lola
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Mar, 2013 10:04 pm
@MattDavis,
Quote:
jinx

yeah, but I beat ya!
MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Mar, 2013 10:07 pm
@Lola,
You did!
I suppose I don't have to get aggressive and fight about though. Wink
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 8 Mar, 2013 10:33 pm
@boomerang,
As I see it, a big part of the violence in football stems from the WAY it is usually played, particularly the way the pros play it i.e. the pro offensive system produces too many two on one and three on one hits. I used to enjoy watching wishbone teams particularly Bear Bryants teams which featured a passing game keyed to the wishbone, but part of what made those teams work was the wishbone isolating ball-carriers and eliminating the many vs one situations.

boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Mar, 2013 11:30 pm
@gungasnake,
And now it seems as if we've come to the time that I have to confess that I am not a football fan. I don't even pretend to understand more than the very basics of the game.

But I love Mo and Mo loves football. He LOVES it. And because HE loves it I put my fears on the shelf.
gungasnake
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 8 Mar, 2013 11:42 pm
@boomerang,
Try to convince him that football is a ticket through college and not necessarily a rational way to earn a living...

0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Fri 8 Mar, 2013 11:43 pm
Part of the problem in contact sports is that when the equipment got better, the hits got harder. The average athlete is bigger and stronger than ever. There have been studies that prove all that protective equipment makes them feel invincible and they tackle or check harder causing more rather than less injuries.
0 Replies
 
MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 12:15 am
In the interests of civility, can we remove the "liberal hysteria" tag. It makes this topic look childish. Rather than a serious matter involving the death of a child.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 12:24 am
@MattDavis,
Okay, Matt. I just tagged it as Concussions. The tags didn't change, so tag it the same and see what happens. We need some votes.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 12:32 am
@roger,
Alrighty, someone tagged it American Society, and it stuck. I'll tag it the same just for luck.
MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 01:04 am
@roger,
Thank you Roger and anonymous do-gooder Very Happy
0 Replies
 
MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 01:24 am
How can schools reduce the risk of violence among students?
How should teachers and other adults react to children's violent acts?
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 03:22 pm
@MattDavis,
I don't think that there's THE or even ONE solution.

Generally, however, mediation and anti-aggressive training will be a good start.
Many schools here have "conflict pilots", trained pupils doing a kind of peer-education.
H2O MAN
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 03:25 pm
@MattDavis,


Corporal punishment.

If a kid gets out of line at school, home or in public the kid gets a smack to the back of the head.

Educate them that there are in fact consequences for their actions.
0 Replies
 
MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 03:29 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
How long has the "conflict pilot" program been in effect?
Has it shown improvements?
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 03:58 pm
@MattDavis,
In Germany, this idea already started in 1995. But it took until now that most schools take part in this 'program'.
It seems to work pretty well.
English website

It is done in Switzerland since 2008 as one of the programs done by persons liable for compulsory community service.


MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 05:13 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Thank you Walter. Very Happy
I especially appreciate that the mediators are peers (fellow student). I think this helps reenforce the reality that mediation is effective leadership. It is not something that can only happen with enforcement "from above" (teachers/police/parents).
It is teaching responsibility (intrinsic), for constructive behavior.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Mar, 2013 03:00 pm
@MattDavis,
I think first we need to quit thinking of it as a school problem. It's not -- it just plays out at school because that's where kids are.

If we really wanted to solve the problem we'd make sure our schools had the funds to deal with the problem. Small classes and counselors would help, and then we'd look for ways to level the playing field by getting rid of things like homework and paying into a general fund that provides needed supplies instead of asking each family to provide their own, we'd look long and hard at eliminating grades and moving to portfolios. We'd most definitely get rid of "behavior management" charts.
H2O MAN
 
  0  
Reply Sun 10 Mar, 2013 03:09 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:

I think first we need to quit thinking of it as a school problem. It's not -- it just plays out at school because that's where kids are.

If we really wanted to solve the problem we'd make sure our schools had the funds to deal with the problem.


I agree that it's not a school problem, it's a family and society problem.

I disagree that schools need more funds to deal with a problem that's not a school problem.
MattDavis
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Mar, 2013 03:14 pm
@boomerang,
I totally agree regarding "behavioral management" charts. Very Happy
I think they are a bad idea for several reasons.
The "sign on the back" problem you mentioned for one.
Additionally, it implies that there is some sort of behavioral "score board". Winners and losers. Labeling children as "good" or "bad".
Talk about self-fulfilling prophesies!
Numerous studies have shown that children quickly (within 1 year) conform to a teacher's biases and prejudices academically and behaviorally.
Some of the saddest studies you will ever read. Crying or Very sad

I also it takes away a feeling of internal responsibility from children. Teaching them that positive behavior can only be "enforced" from above. This doesn't teach children to be moral, this teaches children how to game a system. The result is training machiavellian thinking.
 

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