Gener
 
Reply Sat 23 Feb, 2013 08:40 am
Two months ago I asked for correcting a sentence what I "translated by dictionary" The sentence was "Seeker of the Sacred Light of God"
I am trying to revise this since the word "God" means different things to different people according to their belief.
Please help me out and translate the following:
"Seeker of the Sacred Light"
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 2,347 • Replies: 7
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George
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Apr, 2013 05:56 am
@Gener,
Quaesitor Lucis Sanctae
Gener
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2013 11:28 am
@George,
Welcome back! I hope things are well. I wondered what happened to you since I haven't seen your helping signature on any of the messages for quite a while and lately I did not even checked back. You were a solid, always available help on this forum. Thank you very much for helping out!
George
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2013 12:45 pm
@Gener,
Thanks, Gener.

I have to get away from A2K from time to time. The nastiness on some
threads gets under my skin. But a bit of a break helps me lift my spirits
again.
Gener
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2013 01:47 pm
@Gener,
I am glad you are well George. Thank you again and Godspeed to you.
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Gener
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2013 02:19 pm
@George,
George, I forgot one thing here. It is a strange occurrence and I am trying to find explanation. It may have word play in it of what I am not sure of. Could be Latin and English combination in understanding it.
Please translate: "crastinus_dies"
I pondered the possibilities from a dictionary:
1/ Latin to English:
tomorrow_day
future_day
Crastinus_day
2/ Taking "dies" as an English word:
tomorrow_dies
future_dies
Crastinus_dies
(Gaius Crastinus as a senior centurion under Julius Caesar. He died indeed in a decisive battle at Pharsalus.)

George
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Apr, 2013 06:34 pm
@Gener,
Crastinus is a great word. It is an adjective form of "tomorrow". (The Latin
word for "tomorrow" is cras.) We don't have anything exactly like crastinus
dies
in English. The closest is when we say "tomorrow morning" or "tomorrow
night". Crastinus dies is "tomorrow day".
Gener
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Apr, 2013 04:57 pm
@George,
Thank you very much. I was referring to word play half Latin half English and vice versa. I meant "Crastinus dies" the centurion named Gaius "Crastinus dies". It remains a puzzle for me considering the circumstances it came about.
Thank you again!
0 Replies
 
 

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