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Spain: Bombs Rip Through Train Stations At Rush Hour

 
 
Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2004 03:09 pm
Yes I know of that bomb attack fbaezer, and that was indeed an ETA-bombing, but if you look at the number of bomb attacks and the places where they occurred, I do not think it is a part of the ETA-strategy. But we do not know, that is one thing we - now - know. That's why I also said in my post that it could also well be ETA.
Well UK is indeed the most logical next goal if this is an attack by Al Qaida. But you have the Channel - we only have two stupid landborders with Germany and Belgium :wink:
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2004 03:11 pm
But the Vaalser Berg as natural barrier as well :wink:
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Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2004 03:17 pm
Of course :wink: No, I rather go for our BIG friend Erica Terpstra :wink: She's a HUGE personality :wink:
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hobitbob
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2004 03:18 pm
Lets not forget that the group that "confessed" has frequently confessed for things thay haven't done. They claimed credit for the power outages in the US and Canada and (interestingly enough) the recent earthquake in Morrocco. Confused
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2004 03:19 pm
Laughing
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kickycan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2004 05:31 pm
bm
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Portal Star
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 01:18 am
I have a friend in Spain who frequently took the bus that got bombed. She is okay, but very scared. They cancelled school for a day.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 01:53 am
Four trains in three stations had been bombed, Portal Star.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 02:13 am
Up to two million people have taken part in a demonstration against terror in the Spanish capital Madrid a day after bomb attacks killed nearly 200.

About 11 million Spaniards took part in the demonstrations countrywide, although it was raining in nearly all the places.

All leading Spanish politicians and the royal family took part as well.
They were joined by European allies - Silvio Berlusconi of Italy, Jean-Pierre Raffarin of France as well as their Irish counterpart Bertie Ahern and Romano Prodi representing the European Union.
John Prescott, the UK deputy prime minister, and German Foreign Minister and Vice-Chancellor Joschka Fischer also participated in the march.
The US president condolated the Spanish embassador in Washington.


Officials still say, Basque militants from Eta remain the main suspects.
The government says it is ruling out no line of inquiry. Some clues appear to implicate Islamic radicals.
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hobitbob
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 05:13 pm
Arrests made:
Five Morrocans arrested for interrogation
Quote:
Spain arrests five over bombings
Angel Acebes promised total transparency in the investigation
Spanish authorities have arrested five suspects in connection with the Madrid blasts which killed 200 people.

Interior Minister Angel Acebes told a news conference three Moroccans and two Indians were being held.

The suspects may have links with extremist Moroccan groups, the minister said, but it was still too early to confirm this.

The news comes as protesters held an angry demonstration outside the office of Spain's ruling Popular Party.

BBC correspondent Richard Galpin in Madrid says the protesters - mainly anti-war campaigners - feel Spanish leaders were too swift to blame the Basque separatist group Eta for the bombings.

The demonstrators charge that the government downplayed the theory that it might have been al-Qaeda.

They say the government is scared of losing votes in Sunday's general election because of its unpopular decision to support the invasion of Iraq.

Funerals

The arrests came as the first funerals for the victims of the bombings took place in the capital and across Spain.

The five suspects were arrested in different parts of the capital, and were handed to the country's High Court, which is in charge of investigating the attacks, the minister said.

"Early this afternoon, members of the National Police corps made five arrests, three of citizens of Moroccan nationality, two citizens of Indian nationality, and there are two other Spaniards of Indian origin from whom statements are being taken now," he said.

Mr Acebes said the men were believed to be linked with the sale and falsification of a mobile phone and SIM card found by police near one of the bomb blasts on Thursday.

The phone was inside a bag containing one of the bombs which failed to explode.

Mr Acebes assured the Spanish public that all lines of investigation were still open and he reminded Spaniards it had only just begun.

Funeral services have attracted thousands of mourners
But he promised he would continue to make public every new piece of information.

On Thursday a statement was sent to a London-based newspaper claiming that al-Qaeda was behind the bombings and some Arab commentators in London said they believed it to be genuine.

Most recently, a radio station claimed to have been told that investigators are "99% certain" of involvement by Islamic militants by an unnamed intelligence source, but this has not been confirmed.

Tears of a nation

The first funeral masses took place in the capital and other cities on Saturday.

Thousands of people turned up at cemeteries, funeral homes and religious services to mourn those killed.

In Alcala de Henares, the commuter town east of Madrid where the bombed trains had started their journeys, up to 1,000 people crammed into a gymnasium to remember some 30 local people killed.


I wanted to feel a little bit better, because at home I can't do anything
Madrid protester

Bombs' impact on elections
"We have buried a son, 23 years old, a son full of his future," said one father dressed in black.

"We are all overwhelmed."

"Alcala is broken," said Mayor Bartolome Gonzalez.

In Tanatorio Sur, Madrid's biggest funeral home, lack of space meant coffins had to be placed in staff rooms.

Distraught families have been holding vigils.

"My son. Why?" one elderly woman sobbed.

The funerals continued throughout the day, with the last in the Basque city of San Sebastian scheduled for early evening.

On Friday evening up to 11 million people nationwide turned out in heavy rain to protest against the violence.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 05:21 pm
Quote:
Aznar Could Pay Price for Backing Iraq War

By James Lyons, Political Correspondent, PA News


Spanish Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar's tough stance on terror both at home and abroad has met with very different reactions from voters.

Mr Aznar's refusal to give any quarter to Basque separatist terror group Eta won widespread support for his Popular Party.

However, his support for the US-led invasion of Iraq went against overwhelming public opposition to the conflict.

If the Madrid rail bombings were shown to be an act of revenge for that stance experts say he could pay a heavy price in tomorrow's general election.

After Prime Minister Tony Blair, Mr Aznar was US President George Bush's staunchest ally over Iraq.

He backed Mr Bush despite one poll showing 91% of Spaniards were against the war.

Madrid, Barcelona and other major cities saw huge anti-war demonstrations with violence between police and protesters.

In the face of such furious opposition, Mr Aznar stopped short of sending troops to take part in the invasion.

Even the later deployment of 1,300 peacekeepers provoked fresh fury.

Despite these problems, his hard-line stance on Eta coupled with a strong economic record had been expected to deliver him an easy poll win tomorrow.

The margin of victory is likely to be greater if Spaniards accept his government's claims that the Basques are behind the Madrid bombings.

However, the verdict could be very different if voters conclude that outrage was the result of his decision to back Mr Bush.

source: PA via Scotsman
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nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 05:24 pm
Just bookmarking ... I had started a thread cause I thought there wasnt one yet (was highly surprised about that) - but here it is. And pretty much everything I know or have thought about it has already been said. So just bookmarking, see what news comes in.
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 06:04 pm
Three Moroccans and two Indians arrested, our TV News said. And, three suspects were seen using a white van which has now been checked, and a tape with Koranic verses was found in it.....still, it's early days yet. All that stuff could have been planted, or be a deliberate false trail.

Just the same, I can't imagine ETA would want to indiscriminately murder hundreds of Spaniards. That certainly would not help them achieve their aims, in terms of popular support.

So, muslim extremists are now the prime suspects, it seems.
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Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 06:11 pm
Book of condolences for Spanish victims stolen from Central Birmingham mosque tonight. Why?
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hobitbob
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 06:14 pm
Huh? I don't get it.
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Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 06:22 pm
not sure I do hence the ? mark

aparantly a book of condolences was left open for people to sign at the central mosque in Birmingham (uk) and someone nicked it!

It could be just mindless thieves
It might be someone trying to make a point

Are they trying to frighten people, you express condolences and we know who you are...?
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hobitbob
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 06:29 pm
Okay. I wasn't sure what a book of condolences was.
It was likely a stupid thief.
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 06:33 pm
Walter wrote:
However, the verdict could be very different if voters conclude that outrage was the result of his decision to back Mr Bush.


Or not... it seems to me that this kind of terrorist outrage fuels anger at the terrorists most of all.

Are we angry at the boy who puts the stick in the hornets' nest? Yes, we are but still when the hornets come buzzing the house, we look for ways to eradicate the hornets.

To me (and I'm not & never have been "for the war") a revenge attack by terrorists of whatever ilk only proves the war-mongers' point.

It will be interesting to see how their election goes.
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kickycan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 06:34 pm
Al Quaeda was responsible apparently.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=514&u=/ap/20040314/ap_on_re_eu/spain_al_qaida_8
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hobitbob
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2004 06:36 pm
Piffka wrote:
Walter wrote:
However, the verdict could be very different if voters conclude that outrage was the result of his decision to back Mr Bush.


Or not... it seems to me that this kind of terrorist outrage fuels anger at the terrorists most of all.

Are we angry at the boy who puts the stick in the hornets' nest? Yes, we are but still when the hornets come buzzing the house, we look for ways to eradicate the hornets.

To me (and I'm not & never have been "for the war") a revenge attack by terrorists of whatever ilk only proves the war-mongers' point.

It will be interesting to see how their election goes.

Hmm...I would see it as a further reason to be angry at those who desired the war, against the wishes of the citizenry. Sort of like saying: "Thanks for increasing the chance for us to die for your politicial gamesmanship and business profits."
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