13
   

Joining a local group for white supremacy

 
 
JTT
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2012 07:32 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Quote:
See, Familyman, most of us (by 'us' I mean most normal people) aren't particularly concerned with the 'superiority' of our race


If that's the case, Merry, then why have so many innocent people of color died, continue to die with the strong support of the US citizenry.

There sure can't be very many of those "normal people" you talk of. Because it seems that none of these "normal people" really give a **** about the millions who have been slaughtered with the "normal" people's tax dollars.

It's actually awfully rich to hear y'all lecturing some guy about his moral failings.

How much did you kick in to help Reagan slaughter 50 thousand Nicaraguans and destroy a country that was really going places?
0 Replies
 
Caitlin Krouse
 
  0  
Reply Mon 5 Aug, 2013 05:20 pm
@jcboy,
I"ve tried looking all over downtown Indianapolis, but all I could find are places where they let impure people with Jewish heritage in! So gross. I can't believe they'd let people like that in!
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 5 Aug, 2013 05:48 pm
@Caitlin Krouse,
Quote:
I"ve tried looking all over downtown Indianapolis, but all I could find are places where they let impure people with Jewish heritage in!


Yeah, I`ve noticed that about Indianapolis. Sad
0 Replies
 
JoeBruno
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Aug, 2013 10:40 am
@Familyman7280,
Have you tried the Jones Hospital For the Criminally Insane?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Aug, 2013 11:59 am
@JoeBruno,
Interesting quote, Joe.

=============
Justice is a good thing,maybe the best of things;it punishes the guilty,comforts the victim and protects the innocent;it is the closest
we will ever come to a perfect world.

Josef Tandofsky
===============

Wouldn't it be grand if all those countries that the USA has brutalized, stolen from, murdered their citizens, killed and sickened their children, destroyed their infrastructures, ... could get this "justice"?
JoeBruno
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 01:02 pm
@JTT,
Was any of that done during wartime?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 03:07 pm
@JoeBruno,
Some was done during war time, WWI & WWII, but the vast majority of it was done during illegal invasions of sovereign nations by the USA.
JoeBruno
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 02:58 am
@JTT,
Such as?
JoeBruno
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 02:59 am
@JTT,
There is an international court for war crimes at the Hague, Netherlands.
Has anyone brought charges against the USA there?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 11:03 am
@JoeBruno,
Quote:
There is an international court for war crimes at the Hague, Netherlands.
Has anyone brought charges against the USA there?


Yes, Joe. But the US just ignores these.

Nicaragua v. United States

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicaragua_v._United_States

================

Military and Paramilitary Activities in and against Nicaragua (Nicaragua v. United States of America)

http://www.icj-cij.org/docket/index.php?sum=367&p1=3&p2=3&case=70&p3=5

===============

General Assembly renews call for end to US embargo against Cuba

13 November 2012 – For the 21st consecutive year at the United Nations, the General Assembly today adopted a resolution calling for an end to the economic, commercial and financial blockade imposed by the United States against Cuba.

By a vote of 188 in favour to three against (Israel, Palau and the United States) with two abstentions (Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia), the Assembly reiterated its call to all States to refrain from promulgating and applying laws and measures not conforming with their obligations to reaffirm freedom of trade and navigation.

The 193-member Assembly “once again urges States that have and continue to apply such laws and measures to take the necessary steps to repeal or invalidate them as soon as possible,” the text added. For

The Minister of Foreign Affairs of Cuba, Bruno Rodríguez Parrilla, told the Assembly during the debate that preceded the vote that the last four years of US President Barack Obama’s administration has witnessed a “persistent tightening” of the blockade, which has been in place for over half a century.

“There is no legitimate or moral reason to maintain this blockade,” he stated, adding that the use of “less strident and threatening rhetoric” and certain partial measures to relax the travel restrictions on residents of Cuban origin and others for academic, scientific or cultural purposes have failed to conceal the tightening of the blockade over the last four years.

“The blockade is one of the main causes of the economic problems of our country and the major obstacle to its economic and social development,” he added.

...

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=43482&Cr=cuba#.Ug5bAZIWIhM
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 11:07 am
@JoeBruno,
Quote:
Such as?


I'll just give you the link. You can see and read about all the invasions there.

Quote:
FROM WOUNDED KNEE TO LIBYA:

A CENTURY OF U.S. MILITARY INTERVENTIONS

by Dr. Zoltan Grossman

The following is a partial list of U.S. military interventions from 1890 to 2011.

http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/interventions.html

0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 07:34 pm
@JoeBruno,
JoeBruno wrote:

There is an international court for war crimes at the Hague, Netherlands.


The US doesn't officially recognize that court's right to try Americans. They never ratified the Rome Statute that created the court. Clinton signed the Rome Treaty, and then Bush went and "unsigned" it.

Quote:
Bush 'Unsigns' War Crimes Treaty

The Bush administration has pulled out of the treaty to establish the International Criminal Court -- a move that is both unprecedented and foolhardy.

May 5, 2002 |

The Bush administration Monday formally renounced its obligations as a signatory to the 1998 Rome Statute to establish an International Criminal Court (ICC). Critics say the decision to "unsign" the treaty will further damage the United States' reputation and isolate it from its allies.

"Driven by unfounded fears of phantom prosecutions, the United States has hit a new nadir of isolationism and exceptionalism," said William Schulz, executive director of Amnesty International's U.S. section (AIUSA).

A simple three-sentence letter to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan formally ended U.S. participation in an agreement to create the world's first permanent tribunal to prosecute war crimes, genocide, and other crimes against humanity. In the letter, Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, John Bolton, asserted that Washington "does not intend to become a party to the (Rome Statute of the ICC)" and that it "has no legal obligations arising from its signature (to the treaty) on December 31, 2000."

The ICC treaty -- which was signed by President Bill Clinton -- has been signed by almost 140 countries and ratified by 66 and takes formal effect July 1.

Right-wing hawks in the Bush administration have been gunning for the ICC even before the inauguration. The author of the U.N. letter, John Bolton, was perhaps the most outspoken foe of the Rome Statute in Washington even before his appointment to the State Department. As vice president of the neo-conservative American Enterprise Institute and a trusted adviser of Sen. Jesse Helms, Bolton argued that the Court compromises U.S. constitutional guarantees, U.S. sovereignty, and could be used to pursue politically-motivated prosecutions of U.S. troops stationed overseas.

He also helped draft a pending bill in Congress, the American Servicemen's Protection Act (ASPA), which not only bars any U.S. cooperation with the court, but also bars U.S. military aid to other countries unless they agree to shield U.S. troops on their territory from ICC prosecution. It also bans U.S. troops from taking part in UN peacekeeping operations unless the UN Security Council explicitly exempts them from possible prosecution.

One version of the bill, which is still being discussed in Congress, would open the way for the president to use force to free U.S. prisoners hauled before the ICC, which is to be located at The Hague, in the Netherlands.
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:20 pm
@Kolyo,
I didn't provide a link to the source of that quote. Here it is:

http://www.alternet.org/story/13055/bush_'unsigns'_war_crimes_treaty
0 Replies
 
 

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