revelette
 
  2  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 01:41 pm
@snood,
Not only that but he missed the two hour meeting about Benghazi in order to hold that press conference.

McCain Misses Classified Briefing While Blasting White House

Quote:
Senator John McCain is demanding answers on the Benghazi attack, but his office tells ABC News he missed a classified briefing on the subject because of a "scheduling error."
0 Replies
 
revelette
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 01:53 pm
@H2O MAN,
Quote:
WASHINGTON (AP) — Superstorm Sandy drove the number of people seeking unemployment benefits up to a seasonally adjusted 439,000 last week, the highest level in 18 months.

The Labor Department says applications increased by 78,000 because a large number of applications were filed in states damaged by the storm. People can claim unemployment benefits if their workplaces close and they don't get paid.

The storm may distort claims for another two weeks, the department has said.

The four-week average of applications, a less volatile number, increased to 383,750.

Before the storm, applications fluctuated between 360,000 and 390,000 this year. At the same time, employers added an average of nearly 157,000 jobs a month. That's barely enough to lower the unemployment rate, which was 7.9 percent in October.

source
0 Replies
 
wmwcjr
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 01:55 pm
@cicerone imposter,
H2O MAN wrote:
Weekly jobless claims rose for the week ending 11/3/12.

Both Pennsylvania (7,766) and Ohio (6,450) lost more jobs,
thanks to layoffs in auto manufacturing and other industries.


cicerone imposter wrote:
Re: H2O MAN (Post 5168141)
You,

Quote:
thanks to layoffs in auto manufacturing and other industries.




Talk about sore losers, being thankful for job loss is beyond politics.



Hi, cicerone imposter! Smile I think you may have misunderstood what H2O MAN was saying. He seems to be saying the loss of jobs was caused by layoffs in auto manufacturing and other industries. I don't believe he was saying that he was happy about it. I'm sure none of us, regardless of our political views, would ever gloat over the loss of jobs.

This is not a criticism. It is simply an attempt to promote understanding.

(And, no, I'm not being partisan. I didn't support either Romney or Obama in the Presidential election.)
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 01:56 pm
@roger,
$5000 would have purchased decent group insurance in 2007. Things aren't so pretty now, even with really large groups.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 02:26 pm
@wmwcjr,
You may be correct, but I'm relying more on waterboy's past posts about his political leanings.

I'm not "that" partisan either, but between Romney and Obama, it was an easy call. I'll never vote for a pathological liar for president.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 04:40 pm
Now what?

The House tries to repeal the ACA via "Congressional Oversight"

http://www.speaker.gov/general/boehner-congressional-oversight-key-obamacare-repeal
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 04:47 pm
@Setanta,
I'm afraid I don't quite understand this post. I thought in every case, we were both speaking about the premium and cost to employer per employee. At the time of my my last job, that money bought good coverage. I believe you were also speaking of your last job, so I just don't take your meaning.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 04:52 pm
@JPB,
JPB wrote:

Now what?

The House tries to repeal the ACA via "Congressional Oversight"

http://www.speaker.gov/general/boehner-congressional-oversight-key-obamacare-repeal


Yeah, I don't think all that hot air really adds up to anything. It just seemed like a bunch of blather and an attempt to subpoena Sebellius (which she will likely ignore).

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 04:53 pm
@wmwcjr,
No mistaking meaning if written as follows,
Quote:
H2O MAN wrote:
Weekly jobless claims rose for the week ending 11/3/12.

Both Pennsylvania (7,766) and Ohio (6,450) lost more jobs to layoffs in auto manufacturing and other industries.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 05:10 pm
It reminds me of the attempts to stonewall Planned Parenthood funding.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  3  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 05:11 pm
I can't find the pizza surcharge posts so I'll plunk this here.

Quote:
Papa John's CEO John Schnatter’s recent statement that the Affordable Care Act will force the pizza chain to raise prices came as good news to Nick Martin.

Martin, a part owner of Ian’s Pizza, a pizza shop with four locations in Wisconsin, said his business has offered full heath care coverage to its 50 full-time employees for years, making it all the more difficult to compete with national chains like Papa John's that pay workers low wages without health benefits.

"This may level the playing field for us,” Martin said of the Papa John's price hike. “If they have to pay for benefits, and that pushes their prices up closer to ours, it will justify what we’ve been paying for and what we’ve been fighting to do the past few years.” (Ian's knows a bit about fighting, having fed demonstrators free slices during last year's protests in Madison.)Huff Post
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 05:33 pm
@JPB,
Generally speaking, in a "family restaurant," cost of sales and salaries and benefits should cost 25 to 30% of gross sales.

According to Papa John's financial statements, their cost of sales and salaries and benefits costs 22.6%.

Based on this generality, they can afford to pay more for employee benefits without the need to increase prices on their food.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 05:57 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Interesting. In the two oil and gas well servicing companies I did books for, wage and salary ran to just one side or the other of 50% of sales. This is exclusive of benefits and payroll taxes.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 05:59 pm
@cicerone imposter,
One thing to watch those restaurant chains for is the number of full time employees vs part time.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 07:11 pm
@JPB,
Papa John can stick his pizzas where the Sun don't shine, preferably right out of the oven.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 07:49 pm
@roger,
There are many variables that determines success or failure of restaurants. Some specialty restaurants are open just for dinner, and are highly successful, while others open 24/7 go broke. Many depend on regulars to remain successful while others must have some iron chef title to do well that can have high turnover of customers.

roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 07:57 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Ah. I see you agree that it is important to distinguish between full and part time restaurant employees when addressing pay and benefits.

Good.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 08:00 pm
@JPB,
JPB wrote:

I can't find the pizza surcharge posts so I'll plunk this here.

Quote:
Papa John's CEO John Schnatter’s recent statement that the Affordable Care Act will force the pizza chain to raise prices came as good news to Nick Martin.

Martin, a part owner of Ian’s Pizza, a pizza shop with four locations in Wisconsin, said his business has offered full heath care coverage to its 50 full-time employees for years, making it all the more difficult to compete with national chains like Papa John's that pay workers low wages without health benefits.

"This may level the playing field for us,” Martin said of the Papa John's price hike. “If they have to pay for benefits, and that pushes their prices up closer to ours, it will justify what we’ve been paying for and what we’ve been fighting to do the past few years.” (Ian's knows a bit about fighting, having fed demonstrators free slices during last year's protests in Madison.)Huff Post



This is dead on. I really could give a **** if the rock-bottom, low-quality businesses who pay their employees dirt wages go out of business - they screw every single person they can, all along the way, in order to provide that 99-cent hamburger (which tastes terrible and is bad for you anyway).

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 08:06 pm
@roger,
Here's an example of the extremes that "can" happen in high end restaurants.

Say the bill for four comes to $1,000; the tip at 20% is $200 for one table. Serve two or three tables, and you're really making some big bucks.

On the other hand, work at a mom and pop family restaurant where the typical bill for four comes to $60. A typical tip will be around $9 at 15%. Whether it's part time or full time, it depends on the success of the restaurant. At the lower end restaurants that are open 24/7, they probably use a lot of part-time help during lunch and dinner hours, and not much beyond that - unless they do a good breakfast crowd. With the average bill in the $15 to $20 range for dinner, that's a $2 to $3 tip. My wife, son and I went to a Chinese restaurant for lunch today, and the bill was $24. I left a $4 tip.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Nov, 2012 08:10 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I now understand we are not part of the same discussion.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Now what, USA?
  3. » Page 18
Copyright © 2024 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 04/19/2024 at 08:15:54