9
   

why does light have a finite speed

 
 
cheeser
 
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:23 am
So, why?
 
View best answer, chosen by cheeser
tsarstepan
  Selected Answer
 
  6  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:27 am
@cheeser,
Light already has 10 points on its driving license. Gained them all 4 billion years ago and it take 5 billion years for the DMV to remove them from her record. One more point for speeding or reckless space travel and her license will be revoked.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:34 am
@cheeser,
Why is PI 3.1415926 or the gravitational constant is 6.67 x 10^-11 N(M*KG)^2 and so on.......it the way the universe is that is all.

And with out any of the factors being what they are the universe would not exist as we know it.
cheeser
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:36 am
@tsarstepan,
why was that necaserry
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:38 am
@BillRM,
Interesting footnote while the speed of light hold inside the universe the universe and space/time can expand faster then this speed and had done so just after the big bang.
0 Replies
 
cheeser
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:42 am
@BillRM,
more specifically if light has no mass and yet has energy, how can it have a finite speed?
rosborne979
 
  4  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:57 am
@cheeser,
cheeser wrote:

more specifically if light has no mass and yet has energy, how can it have a finite speed?

Because time also doesn't pass for it. Things that exist at the speed of light don't experience the passing of time.

The "Speed" of light isn't so much a velocity as it is a structural component of the structure of the Universe. It's a condition which we point at by specifying a velocity.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 07:02 am
@cheeser,
Quote:
more specifically if light has no mass and yet has energy, how can it have a finite speed?


Light had mass if not rest mass what give you the idea that photons does not have mass ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photon#Experimental_checks_on_photon_mass
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 07:15 am
@cheeser,
If there were no limit on the speed of light, then time travel would be possible and everyone would go back to the big bang and meet everyone else.
tsarstepan
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 07:24 am
@DrewDad,
Meeting you there at the sushi restaurant for lunch today, you remember?
chubo1
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 07:50 am
@cheeser,
because light does not have an infinite amount of energy!
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 08:10 am
@cheeser,
cheeser wrote:
So, why?

Why not?
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 08:24 am
@cheeser,
cheeser wrote:
more specifically if light has no mass and yet has energy, how can it have a finite speed?

Because the energy of light is electro-magnetic, not kinetic. Consequently, neither the (absence of) mass nor the speed of light figure into its energy.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 08:42 am
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

Meeting you there at the sushi restaurant for lunch today, you remember?

No, but I will have.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 09:37 am
@cheeser,
I see you are asking questions which either have no answer (like this one), or according to Google, have been discussed at length elsewhere. Ultimately there is always a limit to logical analysis and/or causal explanation because logic always starts with at least one conjecture (Godel), and causality is a cognitive projection about human prediction, rather than an independent physical specification (Hume and Kant).
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 11:56 am
@cheeser,
Quote:
more specifically if light has no mass and yet has energy, how can it have a finite speed?
Cheese that's really a good q and one that has long puzzled me. When I proposed a possible reason--that owing to certain limitations of relativity theory in gaging time at a distance--that we simply underestimate its speed; that eventually it will be shown that light speed isn't absolute after all

That is, by a principle I call "The relativity of relativity" it can be considered to travel much faster than c

But I was attacked mercilessly by all tho I'd be most happy to elaborate
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 12:12 pm
@dalehileman,
Quote:
that owing to certain limitations of relativity theory in gaging time at a distance--that we simply underestimate its speed; that eventually it will be shown that light speed isn't absolute after all



Once more they indeed have mass photons when they are moving they had no rest mass however so the whole issue is being view in a wrong content.

Any physic book will explain the situation hell Einstein books he wrote to explain the subject to the general population is now in the public domain and can be download.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/1630
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 02:18 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
Once more they indeed have mass photons when they are moving
But aren't photons always moving so aren't you simply saying they have mass

Quote:
so the whole issue is being view in a wrong content.
Forgive me Bill but by whom. I for one don't deny photons might have mass
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 03:26 pm
@cheeser,
It is, after all, a physical entity with physical properties restrained by physical laws. Light is not supernatural.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 04:53 pm
@InfraBlue,
Of course not, Blue

However the intriguing q remains: Why c and not some other value
 

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