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animal drawings, paintings. anyone?

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Apr, 2004 02:21 pm
All great work . i always check my work at the sketch stage by holding up a mirror and seeing the drawing in reverse, If it needs adjusting in balance or perspective , I usually get it done then. Then for my finished works I run the drawing through a xerox and expand or shrink it to fit the panel.


Since I have all my works franmed exactly the same, Im used to a flat fee that only varies slightly based upon the size and the type of mat. Im used to 120 to slightly over 200. I use all frames with corner blocks rather than mitered edges. If I used mitred edges in the past i had the frame gold leafed and then the cost became prohibitive for shows. My corner block frames are still a novelty and I have a framer in Lancaster do them all. She does excellent work and iI have them slightly different by the choice of woods and/ or milk paint. I try to achieve and aged patinated look that doesnt overwhelm the work inside.
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Apr, 2004 03:32 pm
secoh you have a talent for graphic work and the poster was a clever twist.

Unlike you farmer my images are never standard sizes Sad but i have a very nice framer who cuts his prices to the bone for me.

I have never seen frames with the corners farmer describes here, though i expect they are available, just that i haven't seen them. I use limed ash a lot as it is light and contemporary and suits my work but yes, framing is a huge expense. It does add the finishing touch though and a bad or cheap frame can spoil a good piece of work.


http://www.able2know.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11568/rosie%20sketches%20a2k.jpg

this is not a finished piece but a lightning quick set of sketches of Rosie, who can't keep still Evil or Very Mad
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Apr, 2004 07:15 pm
Neat, Vivien, love it.
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ableaf
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 06:17 am
I like the poster too.What do you enjoy most drawing using pastels or using your computer?

Hi Vivien ,so did you complete your piece? Would love to see it.

FArmerman thanks for the mirror tip, I will try that next time (if I do a sketch first).

I usually don't make a sketch. I know I should but since I learned to draw on my own I kinda skipped that part.
WHat I do is the following (you might be thinking that I am such a newbie):
I start drawing a particular section of my object ,a part that catches my eye then I build outward from it. I sometimes do sketch first but that only happens when the drawing is large and I am not sure it will meet proportions and that it will fit.
I know, I know I am sure I will have some criticism on my method,but I will accept any suggestions and help from the experts.
Angela.
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 03:29 pm
ableaf wrote:
Hi Vivien ,so did you complete your piece? Would love to see it.
.


is that have i finished the sketches of Rosie? no, I never really intended to, they are just what they are, lightning impressions. If I try to 'finish' them they'll lose the spontaneity they now have. I want to do lots more and then i might consider doing a 'finished' piece. possibly in pastel.

I have lots of work in sketchbooks that just stays there and may or may not be developed at some point.

I'm always buzzing with more ideas than i can work on because of time (and energy) Crying or Very sad

Farmer's point about the mirror is a really good tip - so is turning the work upside down - it helps you to see how the composition is working and if the balance is right.

I think you are reading a slightly different meaning into the word sketch than I am.

When i say sketch i don't mean an underlying working out of where things will go - it is a separate drawing (series of drawings), thinking about the subject, looking at it in different ways, maybe from different angles or in different light, whatever..... The finished piece will develop as something separate in oils, pastels, watercolour etc.

Sometimes i work in the way you describe and sometimes i lightly work out where elements will fit - then put them in - no rules, whatever works at the time. I know at school we were taught not to work outwards like that - but it works for you, so no problems.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 03:53 pm
I tend to paint the whole canvas at once, or draw the whole sheet - and tend to not have one part be worked out more than other parts, but that's me, I am interested in the relation of the parts as part of the "doing". Sooooo, when I start to paint, I tend to draw approximate positions of features of whatever is my subject (usually my work is triggered by, but not tethered to, one of my photographs, sometimes but not always landscapes. Anyway, I uses a wet brush of turps substitute with a little paint of anywhere near a color that interests me for the different parts of the piece, and just start to work things out. I respond after that to the first loose wash/not-even-a-drawing at least as much if not more than responding to the photo, which I might just toss aside.

Even in a sketch now I consider the whole, although I have gotten away from keeping a sketch notebook (I draw landscape plans for a living, which takes away some of my old drawing hunger..) Back in my advanced drawing and painting classes I used to consider the whole model, as opposed to getting the nose right, for example) but it is only lately that I see a model/whatever as being in a space - the nature of what is happening in the space three dimensionally is more interesting to me than that nose...

what has this to do with the topic? I'd probably be putting an indication of the curve of a wing chair on the page with the cat.
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 04:11 pm
yes osso - working on a painting on canvas or aiming to be a 'finished' piece i would work in a very similar way to you.

i agree with eventually tossing the photo aside - copying from it can result in very stiff work.

Everything is also subject to change, the image is built up in layers and elements of lower layers show through. Things may be moved if i feel they need to be - a constant state of flux, relating marks and colours to each other like jazz musicians with music.

When sketching i may or may not work this way - sometimes i do start with a point and build out - the finished dimensions aren't always planned - as with the quick sketches of Rosie, they are just information gathering and not intended to be complete.

it is important to hold in mind whatever interested you in the first place and the 3 dimensionality and sense of place/character can be part of it.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 04:30 pm
You're right, Vivien, they are different ways of working, and I see your Rosie sketches are notations.. I can't verify that I would throw in a wing chair curve either, since I haven't sketched much since I got all involved in spatial design in my other life, design work, and that is not coincidentally when I got so interested in space itself. I sketch quick details for how a structure works or a garden is laid out, but they are like your Rosie pics, notes of a sort, and I guess I wouldn't call the starter maneuvers I do on a canvas a even a sketch - they're primitive marks - that's it... they're just "markers", the start of the jazz dance..

I used to take photos of the process of doing a painting, not that I am so egotistical as to want to memorialize it, but that I could possibly narrow down where I flubbed up, for future reference. I think I mention that once before on a2k, but as ever, have failed to scan stuff to put it on to a2k.
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secoh2000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 05:42 pm
Angela:

What do I like most... drawing with pastels or using the computer? That's a hard one to answer. They both have benifiets. Now I love the computer when it comes to 3d modelling... I love to make my models come to life... although I have very few models lol.

The computer is great for one reason... undo. Oh how i love undo If you make a major mistake you can simply undo it (unlike painting/pastels/drawing... well you can but it's not as easy). I consider the computer to be great (especially illustrator) for making cartoony designs. In fact computers art great for sculpturing, you can build 3d models in a computer, and you have that wonderful undo command again.

When I want to make something lifelife (other than a 3D model) i prefer to use either pencil or pastel, instead of a computer. I used acrylics for my art class... however they were cheap... and the blasted red paint was a pain to work with. So it's a trade off 50-50, they both have benifiets. I'd have to say that I use both equally.

Also, I'd have to say Angela, use what-ever works for you. I've been drawing/sketching/doodling for as long as I can remember. I've never taken an art class (well except for this year... i took 3 classes to finish off my minor). The classes were actually very helpfull for me, however; it's nothing that practice/experimenting/hard work won't teach you.

Also, In my opinion, I think your tigers are really well done. The only tad bit of info i could give... the background may need more darkening (for the middle piece, the two tigers). I see some detail i really like... it almost looks like leaves in the background. It would look cool if you could add some more darker shades to the background, that would really help bring out your tigers (and leaves?), at the moment they sorta meld with the background... unless that is what you want.

Farmerman:

You get your frames made in Lancaster? Thats only a few hours drive from my area (Williamsport), In fact my older brother lives in Lancaster. I really hope I can get them done for around $85-ish... my art professor informed me that B&S Gallery (local gallery) is very generous and very willing to help students.

Another interesting note, I like the mirror idea. For some reason, I really don't know why, sketchs in the mirror look much better than when looking at them normally. When held in the mirror, you get a new view. When i try it, I can tell if the Image is pleasing to my eye or if there is something off (like Vivien said deals with balance). I too was also told (by my proffesor) that you have a good composition, If the piece works upside down/on it's sides/or in the mirror.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 05:48 pm
I don't know what people are using now for instruction books, but I a fan of an older how to draw book by Nicolaides, called The Natural Way to Draw. Much of what I learned in my drawing classes was covered in that book.
I'll look it up and put it in the Portal book listing.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 05:56 pm
I don't know what people are using now for instruction books, but I a fan of an older how to draw book by Nicolaides, called The Natural Way to Draw. Much of what I learned in my drawing classes was covered in that book.
I'll look it up and put it in the Portal book listing.
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JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2004 06:48 pm
Wow - so many great works. You are all so wonderful.
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 May, 2004 06:31 am
Osso-I have all the old watercolor books of Ted Kautsky . These are my favorites., and I used to crop the works when I was taking art. This allowed me to figure out the makeup of really well done paintings . Kautsky would have many vignettes and sub subjects in each painting (sort of like FE Churches epic works)

ableaf and secoh, pardon my impoliteness, welcome to the boards, theres a very active roup of artists here and I love the advice and tips I get from everybody.

The advice about using he mirror was to adjust any perspective problems that may go unnoticed. Sometimes when I do more detailed wildlife subjects , I develop a series of quick sketches and photos . The initial sketches have good perspective usually. When I start to lay out the final panels, thats when my perspective problems occur.. SO , I use a big wall mirror that I have mounted in the studio. I walk up and reflect the work. Any mistakes show up as a
bit of awkwardness in the animals faces I did a series on some turtles a few years ago and I had a lot of problems in the foreshortening of the shells. Looked awkward until I redid them a few times.

Im working in a "primitive" phase now. Im doing a bunch of paintings of Amish kids in as primitive a fashion as I can. I had some interest at an art shop in the tourist areas .
Ive heard of the framer youve mentioned... The Lancaster Art School has frequent shows and the fine arts kids are using a number of framers on Queen ST in the town. The prices are good and, Ive seen works hung at the PCAD shhows . The frames are well done in most cases. The framer becomes an extension of the artist and a good one tries to accentuate the painting .
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ableaf
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 May, 2004 12:27 pm
There is so much that I need to learn.Like I said I never took classes.
What I draw is what I see ,for me it is a very simple and crude concept.
Sorry about my own definition of a sketch Smile .Thats proves that I don't have a clue about art.
Anyway, I will try to absorb as much as I can from this board.

Thank you all for the great tips.
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secoh2000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 May, 2004 05:07 pm
Hey farmer, don't worry about it, no problem. Good news, I just got back from the local framer, and they agreed to frame both pieces for 77$ each. They gave me a large discount (i believe they were originally 130$). It was also cheap because I agreed to assemble the frames myself (they come completed i just need to put the image into the frame and so on). I could have had the gallery do it for me, but then it would have been $110 a piece (I can barely afford $77 Razz) . Another stipluation... the frame had to be metal (to get the student discount). So we settled on a metal frosted silver frame for both pieces with a whitish matte. It's actually pretty cool, the frames make them go together quite nicely (which i really didn't intend Confused).

-Jeff
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 01:42 pm
ossobuco wrote:
I guess I wouldn't call the starter maneuvers I do on a canvas a even a sketch - they're primitive marks - that's it... they're just "markers", the start of the jazz dance..
quote]



what an absolutely brilliant way of describing it. Very Happy YES!
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 01:44 pm
farmerman wrote:


ableaf and secoh, pardon my impoliteness, welcome to the boards, theres a very active roup of artists here and I love the advice and tips I get from everybody.

quote]

seconded Very Happy
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 01:47 pm
ableaf wrote:
Sorry about my own definition of a sketch Smile .Thats proves that I don't have a clue about art.
quote]


definitions don't make artists - their work does and you are doing just fine!
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2004 07:04 pm
Farmer, I'll try and add those Ted Kautsky books to the Portal, or do you want to? when I add something to the portal I try to review it, however lamely. Or I can add it and you add a rating at some point. Have just added a few art books this week and I don't think there is an art book category yet. They may be in self help at this point, ha!
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mouth4thesouth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Aug, 2004 06:18 am
Re: My drawings tigers
ableaf wrote:
What do you think? Any input is appreciated.

http://home.nycap.rr.com/angel1111/tigerb.gif


http://home.nycap.rr.com/angel1111/tigers2b.gif



http://home.nycap.rr.com/angel1111/tigersketchb.jpg


Hey, just wondering if you would ever consider selling some of your tiger art? my boyfriend is a HUGE tiger lover, and id love to buy him an original picture for his birthday. Feel free to email me at [email protected]
hope to hear from you soon
lora mathis x
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