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Fears About Shariah Law Take Hold In Tennessee

 
 
Reply Mon 3 Sep, 2012 12:27 pm
Fears About Shariah Law Take Hold In Tennessee
by Blake Farmer - NPR Morning Edition
September 3, 2012 from WPLN

It's getting tougher to be a Republican in some parts of the country while also fully accepting the practice of Islam.

In Tennessee, an incumbent in the U.S. House found herself on the defensive after being called soft on Shariah law, the code that guides Muslim beliefs and actions. And the state's governor has been forced to explain why he hired a Muslim.

Lee Douglas, a dentist just south of Nashville and an anti-Shariah activist, points to the Muslim woman hired in Tennessee's economic development office as evidence of an "infiltration" of Islam in government. Douglas helped draft a resolution criticizing the governor and Islam. A version of the document has been signed by a growing list of GOP executive committees, from rural counties to the state's wealthiest.

"By stopping this now, we're going to save ourselves a lot of difficulty in the future," he says.

Republican Gov. Bill Haslam defends his Muslim staffer's credentials and says she grew up in a small town. "This is somebody who is very Tennessee," says the governor.

The fact that she's a fellow Tennessean hasn't silenced the critics.

The number of Muslims in Tennessee remains tiny, but it is growing. Many come as refugees. Others are college professors. They're planting roots in one of only three states where, according to a Pew Forum survey, more than half of the population is evangelical protestant.

Douglas believes Islam is diametrically opposed to his faith.

"I don't want anybody to persecute any religion including Islam, but we have a duty as Americans to understand that they intend to take us over and compel us to become Islamic," Douglas says.

The First Amendment may provide the freedom to practice all religions, but, according to Douglas, the "government is showing a deference and is accommodating one single religion — Islam, Shariah," he says.

This is somebody who is very Tennessee.

- Gov. Bill Haslam, defending his Muslim staffer

Douglas says deference should be shown to the religion of the country's Founding Fathers. Instead, Douglas sees the Justice Department making sure a mosque in nearby Murfreesboro could open despite legal challenges.

Rebin Omer attended the first prayers in that mosque. The Kurdish refugee dismisses claims that Islam is violent.

"We haven't seen anything like that from our upbringing or anything, so it's kind of surprising, but the First Amendment gives you the right to worship any religion you want," Omer says.

As one of a thousand mosques built in the U.S. over the past decade, this Islamic center ignited debate across the country and political spectrum — from pulpit pastors to wealthy Republican donors. Health care investor Andy Miller tries to isolate his concerns to the moral code laid out in Muslim holy books, where he finds discrimination toward women.

"I am not anti-Muslim at all. I don't hate anybody. But I do have issues with Shariah law. When you look at Shariah law, it's so antithetical to the things that we hold dear as Americans," Miller says.

This year, Miller pumped a couple hundred-thousand dollars into superPACs supporting a candidate who shares his views. Lou Ann Zelenik made Islam a campaign issue in both of her failed but fiery bids for Congress.

While Zelenik lost to Rep. Diane Black again in this month's Republican primary, Black felt pressure to show toughness.

"I understand the devastation that Shariah law could mean here in our country, and I'm a sponsor of a bill that will once again say that the United States Constitution is our law and that it is the supreme law," Black said.

Besides the federal legislation, more than 20 states have considered bills banning the use of Shariah law. The proposals are a solution in search of a problem, according to many. But to the anti-Shariah crowd, they are another way to get their fears taken seriously.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 10 • Views: 1,482 • Replies: 13
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BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Sep, 2012 01:10 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Quote:
In Tennessee, an incumbent in the U.S. House found herself on the defensive after being called soft on Shariah law, the code that guides Muslim beliefs and actions. And the state's governor has been forced to explain why he hired a Muslim.

Lee Douglas, a dentist just south of Nashville and an anti-Shariah activist, points to the Muslim woman hired in Tennessee's economic development office as evidence of an "infiltration" of Islam in government. Douglas helped draft a resolution criticizing the governor and Islam. A version of the document has been signed by a growing list of GOP executive committees, from rural counties to the state's wealthiest.



I guess no one had read the US constitution in Tennessee of late.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Religious_Test_Clause

The No Religious Test Clause of the United States Constitution is found in Article VI, paragraph 3, and states that:

The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.This has been interpreted to mean that no federal employee, whether elected or appointed, career or political, can be required to adhere to or accept any religion or belief. This clause immediately follows one requiring all federal and state officers to take an oath or affirmation of support to the Constitution, indicating that the requirement of such a statement does not imply any requirement by those so sworn to accept a particular religion or a particular doctrine. The option of giving an "affirmation" (rather than an "oath") can be interpreted as not requiring any metaphysical belief or as a nod to Mennonites and Quakers who would not swear oaths but would make affirmations.

The clause is cited by advocates of separation of church and state as an example of "original intent" of the Framers of the Constitution of avoiding any entanglement between church and state, or involving the government in any way as a determiner of religious beliefs or practices. This is significant because this clause represents the words of the original Framers, even prior to the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.

Joe Nation
 
  2  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 08:40 am
@BillRM,
And they haven't read the First Amendment:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

These people are the American Taliban. They want to base our laws on what their peculiar interpretation of Christian scripture is. They do not accept the primary idea of the First Amendment: no establishment of any religion. They would use the power of law to prohibit others from exercising beliefs unlike their own.

These are the same people who have for years decried Jews and Catholics as outsiders. Who see nothing wrong with a Baptist preaching in the city parks on any day of the week, but who passed laws preventing Jehovah's Witnesses from even entering the town lest they "litter the ground with their pamphlets." Lovell v. City of Griffin

They are souls full of ignorance and fear. Shame on them.

Joe(shame on us if we don't stand against them)Nation
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 08:46 am
@Joe Nation,
you know what's funny to me about this?

these same tenessee folks that hate all muslims are kinda soft on the brown skinned folks from down south...

because they do the dirty work, much like the darker skinned workers they were forced to give up a century or so back.

there were lots of undocumented workers where I was just south of Nashville.

but they didn't have little rugs or funny singing prayers to attract attention...
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 09:36 am
Does Shariah law allow us to cut out the tongue of idiots? I might be for it.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 10:22 am
@RABEL222,
I think all you can do is stone them.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 10:42 am
@Rockhead,
Hey, as long as "those people" are willing to stand in little groups at the closed Citgo gas station at 4AM so that Jim Bob and his brother, Bobby James*, can come by and pick them up to daylabor (until dark) picking and packing for six bucks an hour, nobody will say a word against them.

They only charge them five dollars for the transportation. Each way.

Joe(They should be grateful)Nation


PS
*Yes, I think it was the Whittles family who had the two boys, born three years apart, one named ROBERT JAMES and the other JAMES ROBERT and yes, they did call them R.J. and J.R until they were about fourteen, then the boys themselves decided they wanted to be called "Jim Bob" and "Bobby James". It was kind of fun around rodeo time when they competed against each other in the saddle bronc events.

Joe(both dumber than a sack of empty beer bottles)Nation
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 10:45 am
That's the solution, Roger. Everybody must get stoned. That sage from the 1960s had this exactly right.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 11:17 am
@Thomas,
That's an interesting slant, Thomas, but are you sure it should be required by law?
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 11:53 am
@roger,
If it aint it should be!!
0 Replies
 
wmwcjr
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 12:00 pm
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
That's the solution, Roger. Everybody must get stoned. That sage from the 1960s had this exactly right.


0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 12:46 pm
@roger,
Quote:
That's an interesting slant, Thomas, but are you sure it should be required by law?


Everybody must get stoned law.
Everyone is required to be stoned at least four nights and three mornings a week, not including weekends.

Two weekly staff meeting a month must be attended and PARTICIPATED in per month while completely stoked up and toked up.

("Hey, way cool idea, bossman, way.")

Joe(Don't worry HE's stoned too.)Nation

0 Replies
 
mysteryman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 04:42 pm
The people in Tennessee that are so afraid of Sharia law apparently have no brains.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Sep, 2012 07:33 pm
Quote:
"I don't want anybody to persecute any religion including Islam, but we have a duty as Americans to understand that they intend to take us over and compel us to become Islamic," Douglas says.


they ??

unbelievable. Well, not really. The ignorance is not surprising, but the fact it got as far as it did is concerning.

These same people hold rallies and talk about fighting for freedom. When people say our country is headed in the wrong direction, I agree. How did people like this get into power?
0 Replies
 
 

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