5
   

Do any of you have Ukrainian ancestry?

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 09:02 pm
Hmmmmm.....
Pigs' trotters?
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shortncute11185
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Sep, 2005 08:03 am
and some salo to go with that!
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Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Sep, 2005 08:04 am
I'm there too!
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Sep, 2005 04:17 pm
Oh, definitely! Very Happy
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shortncute11185
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Jun, 2006 03:29 pm
again, attempting to break the silence of this wonderful forum topic Very Happy :


what are your predictions about team Ukraine in next week's upcoming World Cup Soccer event? Cool
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Jun, 2006 11:22 pm
Oh, a Ukrainian victory, definitely! Without a doubt they are superior in every possible way! Very Happy






(Now don't go putting any money on this, s'n'c .... I should warn you I know absolutely zilch about world cup soccer. But I feel a victory is definitely on the cards! :wink:
0 Replies
 
ffydownunder
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Jun, 2006 02:24 am
my step family (dad's wife's side) are all ukranian. Dad's wife and step daughter now live in UK but the rest of the family is back in Odessa

Sorry haven't read this whole topic, but has anyone ever experienced a Ukranian Chritsmas dinner.... all 15 courses of it???? I managed to course 3 and then was done.... Dad's Mrs was royally pi**ed off that i couldn't eat 4 - 15. Never in my life have i seen so much food! No wonder they have to start eating when the first star appears in the sky... that way they're just about finished for New Year!
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jun, 2006 06:58 am
Nope, never done a formal 15 courser, ffydownunder. (I think one would have to do some serious training for that!) But I'm very familiar with the "groaning Ukrainian table" - I grew up with it! This is how it worked: unsuspecting guests would sit down at the table & bits of this & that would appear, piled high. Then the dishes kept coming & coming. It didn't matter that the guests declared themselves seriously full, after 3 or 4 serves. My father would declare that the the pikers (usually my friends) were "skinny rabbits" that needed to eat more to build up their strength! Needless to say, often my poor friends were almost comatose, totally stuffed with food. No amount of warning them in advance could prepare any of them for the first time they experienced good old Ukrainian hospitality!
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the prince
 
  2  
Reply Fri 9 Jun, 2006 07:07 am
Havent had a Ukranian for a while. The only guy I know from Ukraine is so irritating that everytime he opens his mouth I want to punch him.
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jun, 2006 07:09 am
the prince wrote:
Havent had a Ukranian for a while. The only guy I know from Ukraine is so irritating that everytime he opens his mouth I want to punch him.


Really?
That's not like you, G! Surprised
He must be quite obnoxious!
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Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Mon 1 Jan, 2007 01:57 pm
An obnoxious Ukrainian? Not possible. He clearly must be trying to fit in where he doesn't belong.
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Jan, 2007 03:08 pm
Surprised

Oh my!
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 May, 2007 11:06 pm
Don't ask me why, but this afternoon I reread this thread (started in 2004) & found all sorts of things here I'd completely forgotten about. Found myself laughing out loud at some of farmerman's Ukrainian observations. Funny, at the time (not knowing fm very well) I took a lot of his comments quite literally. Silly me. In fact, they were very, very amusing. Like this one on church:

farmerman wrote:
...Church-feh. I had the distinction of being raised by an amalgam of Catholic and orthodox traditions. youd have an Easter Holiday that lasted a damn month. the entire month was death and blood and torture. Id have been more comfortable being an aztec. Guilt, and sober reflection followed by feasting on artery clogging fats with hardly a hope of dessert. at least the Lutherans had lime jello.


Laughing
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 May, 2007 11:08 pm
Better a few late laughs than to miss the humour altogether, I guess? :wink:
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Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 May, 2007 06:52 am
msolga wrote:
Don't ask me why







Did you now?


(well you said not ask Why)
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 May, 2007 08:14 am
Yes, indeed I did!

And very entertaining & informative it was, too! Very Happy

You know, I really miss some of the older A2K threads where anyone might just pop in & say their bit. Often going right off topic in the process. (Like Setanta's impassioned defence of Irish cooking against farmerman's criticisms. On a thread about Ukrainian ancestry! Laughing )These days we seem rather more segregated into different different interest/friendship groups.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Apr, 2010 04:58 pm
On another thread (on of the tsar's, which I can't find again) Merry Andrew & I (& others) had a discussion about perogies .. about whether they are eaten with a fork or not. (after Ceili had posted a photograph of a gigantic perogi monument from somewhere in Canada, which was an astonishment to behold! Surprised )

Anyway ... Andrew (who has Lativan ancestry) said he had never eaten perogi with a fork .. which surprised the rest of us, because we had only ever eaten the little devils with a fork. Was there any other way, we responded?

Andrew, if you should read this, I did a little online research (then promptly lost the appropriate thread & couldn't respond!) and you're absolutely correct .. perogi are traditionally cooked differently by Lativians & are eaten with the hand, not a fork at all. As an accompaniment to soup. Borst, if I recall correctly.

But Ukrainians (& many other cultures) do it differently. As they are boiled & served hot, a fork is absolutely essential to eat them.

So that clears that up! Very Happy

The other thing that confused me a little was that others called these dumpling-like creations "pirogi", while I had always called them "varenyky". How come, I wondered? Confused

Then a little more research revealed that varenyky is (one of the) the traditional Ukrainian names.

So that clears that up, too!

Fascinating stuff this, isn't it? Smile Wink


Quote:
Varenyky (also known as Perogies, Pyrohy, Pedehey or heaven on a plate), a staple Slavic fare for centuries...


http://www.allthingsukrainian.com/Recipe/Varenyky/Images/btnFryVarenyky.jpg


Varynyky recipe:
http://www.allthingsukrainian.com/Recipe/Varenyky/index.html

`
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Fri 2 Apr, 2010 06:06 pm
http://web.mac.com/lubap/Ukrainian_Easter/Traditions_files/easter%20jh.gif

Happy Easter to any Ukrainian A2Kers out there, who ever you might be..
Easter is a very big deal, I know.

I'm afraid I'm not a very good Ukrainian when it comes to such things, but enjoy your celebrations.

Especially the part on Easter Sunday when the girls & boys get to kiss (after the marathon service!) declaring "Christ has arisen!" (That was just about the only good bit I can recall, to tell the truth! Very Happy Wink )


http://web.mac.com/lubap/Ukrainian_Easter/Traditions.html
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djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Apr, 2010 06:12 pm
a bad joke from the troll thread

http://able2know.org/topic/143018-28#post-3951667
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Apr, 2010 06:17 pm
@djjd62,
Spot on, djjd!

A bad joke, indeed! Smile
0 Replies
 
 

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