5
   

Do any of you have Ukrainian ancestry?

 
 
shortncute11185
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 06:29 am
according to the link I provided above, yes, Jewish is not just considered a religious practice but a nationality as well in Ukraine, which I find to be the case for most former Soviet States
0 Replies
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 06:30 am
And which nationality can that be?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 06:37 am
shortncute11185 wrote:
according to the link I provided above, yes, Jewish is not just considered a religious practice but a nationality as well in Ukraine, which I find to be the case for most former Soviet States


Well, some thousands of Jews from the former Soviet Union are arriving in Germany (more than 120,000 within the last ten years), a great percentage from the Ukraine.

There opinion about their [former] nationality is as well different to yours, shortncute, as the official one.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 06:44 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
msolga wrote:
And yes, Ukrainian food is wonderful! ... farmerman, thinks it's quite horrible...


<I must admit that I like more the "Central European Versions" of Borschtsch, Mlinzi, Pirogi, Wareniki, Golubzi to the original Ukrainian kind, too :wink: >


I just can't let this pass, Walter! What is this about "Central European versions" of the blessed food of the Motherland? Shocked Plagiarism, theft, pure & simple, I say! Evil or Very Mad
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 06:51 am
You are certainly correct, msolga.

But I admit that Borecka, Kaladetz, Hallupsi, Grumera Wurst, Kraut Paruch, Kees Knoepfla etc just tastes better for me :wink:
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 06:54 am
Ah, they're all great, Walter! Peasant food is the best food! Very Happy
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 06:55 am
Right, but that is German-Ukrainian food Laughing
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 06:58 am
No! You KNOW what the correct answer is, Walter! Laughing
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 07:08 am
Swabian-Ukranian?
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 07:11 am
Swabian-modified Ukrainian! Razz
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 07:12 am
What I said: good old blessed food from Central Europe Laughing
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 07:15 am
<shaking head vigorously>

Walter, Walter ...! You are very stubborn! Laughing
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 07:16 am
Did you meet Mrs. Walter Shocked
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Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 07:17 am
Laughing Laughing Laughing
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 07:17 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Did you meet Mrs. Walter Shocked


<No, she didn't - otherwise she would have said:'Walter, as usual, you are soooooooooooooooo ....'>
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2005 07:18 am
Laughing
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2005 06:35 am
shortncute11185 wrote:
I've finally discovered the top NINE populated cities in Ukraine and here they are in case anyone hadn't known before and is curious to find out:

Kyiv--2.61m
Kharkiv--1.47m
Dnipropetrovsk--1.07m
Odesa--1.03m
Donetsk--1.02m
Zaporizhia--815,000
Lviv--733,000
Kryvyi Rih--669,000
Mykolaiv--514,000

source: http://www.ucrainica.info/intro/distribution.htm



demographics:
Ukrainian 77.8%
Russian 17.3%
Romanian 0.8%
Belarusian 0.6%
Crimean Tatar 0.5%
Bulgarian, Hungarian, Polish 0.4%
Jewish 0.3%

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukraine#Demographics


very fascinating facts!! Smile


Thanks for that, S'n'C! Very Happy
Yes, interesting, indeed!
0 Replies
 
shortncute11185
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2005 08:10 am
Dobryy den msolga!

I have a linguistic question for you:

If a Ukrainian and a Russian were to converse one day in their native tongues, would t be easy for them to understand each other?

For instance if a French-speaking person from France and a French-Canadian were to converse they'd be able to interpret what the other is saying even if their accent is somewhat different and the don't have the exact same terminology.

Just wondering... Smile
0 Replies
 
SerSo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2005 12:34 pm
shortncute11185 wrote:
[..]If a Ukrainian and a Russian were to converse one day in their native tongues, would t be easy for them to understand each other?[..]

My mother tongue is Russian and when I hear Ukrainian speech I can say I do understand most of it. Of course it all depends: if a Ukrainian wanted me to understand nothing of what he or she says such person would have no problem doing so, I believe. It is easier for a Russian to grasp written text than verbal conversation: I recollect when I was only a 10 year old boy I could read verse in Ukrainian and it was not difficult to me at all. If two Ukrainians talk one to another and speak quickly I can only attempt to guess what it is all about. But when I listen to the radio and the station is Ukrainian I do understand it, especially news. That is to say a Russian can understand 90% of a Ukrainian analogue of BBC English but in a colloquial form it may be not so simple.

I am Russian myself but my father and the father of my mother were Ukrainians. Though one cannot surprise anyone here with Ukrainian ancestry.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2005 05:54 am
Dobryy den back at you, S'n'C! Very Happy

There's a lot of overlap in Slavic languages (not that I'm an expert in these things.) When I was in Yugoslavia I could understand enough words (About every eighth or so) to get by. I was also constantly mistaken for a local (brown hair, brown eyes, high cheekbones, skin colouring - I looked just like one of them.) Folk would get stroppy & think I was playing games with then when, after the initial "Dobryy den", I often appeared a bit dazed & confused by the rest of the conversation. Thought I was trying to be smart! Very Happy

I have a recently arrived exchange student in one of my classes, from Czechoslovakia ... She nearly fell out of here seat with shock when I hit her with "Dobryy den!" the other morning. Very Happy The last thing she expected to come out of her teacher's mouth! But I think I'll have to learn a few more useful things to say ... I'm a bit stumped after that! You probably know more Ukrainian than me!
0 Replies
 
 

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