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New Type Of Resistant Malaria Appears On Thai-Burmese Border

 
 
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2012 11:30 am
Just what the world needs, a new Malaria disease. BBB

New Type Of Resistant Malaria Appears On Thai-Burmese Border
by Richard Knox - NPR
April 5, 2012

A micrograph shows red blood cells infected by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

Malaria experts have been holding their breath and hoping it wouldn't happen. But it has.

Malaria parasites resistant to the last, best drug treatment, called artemisinin combination therapy, or ACT, are infecting people along the border of Thailand and Myanmar.

This is 500 miles away from the first focus of ACT-resistant malaria in Cambodia. And it's a different form of resistant malaria, which means it arose independently of the Cambodian type rather than spreading from there. We're talking here about Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest and most common form of malaria.

The discovery ruins the World Health Organization's hope that resistance to ACT might be stamped out for good in Cambodia. Now it's a two-front war.

An international team of researchers is publishing the news in The Lancet.

Meanwhile, many of the same scientists report in Science that they've zeroed in on changes in the parasite's genes that drive this new form of resistance. That gives hope that its spread may be monitored and that new drugs might someday be devised to foil resistance.

But the bad news outweighs the good. The new resistance raises concern that the tantalizing prospect of eliminating malaria might slip away again, as it did when the parasite developed resistance to the drug chloroquine in the 1960s through the 1990s. More than 600,000 people die of malaria each year, but the toll has been falling.

Artemisinin-based therapies are a big reason why the hope of eliminating malaria has been rising. Other reasons are wide distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets to prevent mosquitoes from transmitting the parasite at night, and last fall's announcement that the first large field trial of a malaria vaccine reduced infections by 55 percent.

"Anti-malarial control efforts are vitally dependent on artemisinin combination treatments," write Anne-Catrin Uhlemann and David Fidock of Columbia University in a Lancet editorial. "Should these regimens fail, no other drugs are ready for deployment, and drug development efforts are not expected to yield new anti-malarials until the end of this decade."

Thus, the new focus of resistant malaria is likely to stimulate urgent strategy sessions about whether it can be contained, as authorities still hope the Cambodian outbreak might be.

Working against that is the fact that the new resistance involves Myanmar, which has a lot of malaria and a weak public health system.

Researchers say that ACT regimens are not totally impotent against the newly resistant parasites. But there has been a rapid increase in what they call "slow clearing" of infections.

The proportion of patients with the slowest response to treatment in western Thailand has increased from less than 1 percent in 2001 to 20 percent in 2010.

The biggest fear is that resistant forms of malaria will emerge in sub-Saharan Africa, where malaria afflicts and kills more people than anywhere else.

Uhlemann and Fidock say malaria fighters are in a race against time. Increased resistance to ACT "emphasizes the need to both monitor for signs of emergence resistance," they write, "and implement all available measures towards malaria elimination while we can."
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 1,022 • Replies: 8
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Fido
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2012 12:39 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Where walks poverty, there walks misery...

The rich will not be happy until they have eliminated all the poor, and can breed limitlessly until they once again breed poverty...And you cannot say this is a matter of choice... This is what happens when choice is denied because people still act even without political power or education... They act in a percieved sense of self interest even if it destroys all good, and all of humanity... People cannot see beyond the moment, and profit blinds all people in government who should be combining their sight in order to discern the future..
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2012 12:48 pm
@Fido,
Ironically, it's some of the richest people in the world trying to stamp out malaria.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Apr, 2012 06:29 am
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:

Ironically, it's some of the richest people in the world trying to stamp out malaria.
Wouldn't you if it were interfering with your ability to make money off of the poorest of people???
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Apr, 2012 04:28 pm
Rachel Carson's legacy grows evermore tragic.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2012 12:59 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

Rachel Carson's legacy grows evermore tragic.
Only because song birds are about gone, and we have become the victims of our own thoughtless actions... Money is the universal equivilant... What is morality worth??? Money... What is human life worth??? Money... What is the sun shine worth, fresh water and air??? Money... What are all the birds in the air, the fish in the sea, and the animals on the earth worth??? Money... What is the earth worth??? Money
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2012 02:28 pm
@Fido,
The single use pesticides that were identified by Carlson have shown amazing resistance developed by all the mosquitos species that carry both P vivax and P falciparum. DDT has been tried over and over in those areas that are seing these new resistant strains and still the stupid douche bags insist on stuffing this stuff into the air. The method of inducing resistance in genes of mosquitoes is now well understood its all done by protein peptide linkages with peroxides as "assistants" in linkage.
Integrated pest management wherein natural AND multiple groups of pesticides are used seems to be working to an estremely high degree of success but the chemical companies still feed a lot of cash to the poor nations wherein DDT is still exclusivey used for the mosquitoes.

In the US, environmenta controls have actualy spurred on entirey new industries and these have been refleted in our GDP .
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2012 02:29 pm
@Fido,
Quote:
Only because song birds are about gone, and we have become the victims of our own thoughtless actions... Money is the universal equivilant... What is morality worth??? Money... What is human life worth??? Money... What is the sun shine worth, fresh water and air??? Money...
so your entire point is that money is bad?. Suppose that money could help solve the problem?
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2012 05:24 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Quote:
Only because song birds are about gone, and we have become the victims of our own thoughtless actions... Money is the universal equivilant... What is morality worth??? Money... What is human life worth??? Money... What is the sun shine worth, fresh water and air??? Money...
so your entire point is that money is bad?. Suppose that money could help solve the problem?
money is never the solution, and is always the problem. It can stand as well for honor as dishonor, but honor can only stand for itself.
0 Replies
 
 

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