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Frightening new take on Neanderthals

 
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 03:46 am
@gungasnake,

Quote:
An aquatic mammal has little if any need for a sense of smell.


Debatable, very, imho.
0 Replies
 
iamsam82
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 03:56 am
@gungasnake,
Gung, you haven't responded to my point about the position of the foramen magnum on Neanderthal skulls yet and it's impact on his upright posture (see http://able2know.org/topic/184929-7#post-5063925). Keen to hear your rebuttal.
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 07:52 am
@iamsam82,
Your claim appears to arise from a children's article and I've never heard anybody else make it, therefore I view it as eminently worth ignoring.

For that matter Ambam clearly has the ape spine-head connection and holds his head reasonably upright when standing or walking on two feet.

gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 08:01 am
For the benefit of newcomers, a few of Danny Vendramini's Neanderthal reconstructions, courtesy Danny Vendraamini at:

http://www.themandus.org

Some images without the ice-age fur coat for illustration purposes. I believe the best thing to do with all previous attempts at Neanderthal reconstructions is to toss them.

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r53/icebear46/n5.gif

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r53/icebear46/n4.gif

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r53/icebear46/n6.gif

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r53/icebear46/n8.gif

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r53/icebear46/n10.gif

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r53/icebear46/n3.gif

The ONLY thing which bothers me a little bit about most of Vendramini's images is that his artist has a sort of a fight face on most of them, which may or may not have been normal, Vendramini thinks it was.

Fred here on the other hand seems to have a more serious look to him:

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r53/icebear46/Neanderthal_profile.gif

Fred strikes me as a sort of a more serious type, most likely some sort of a business executive Neanderthal and a Neanderthal of wealth and taste.



parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 08:19 am
@gungasnake,
So Danny thinks the spine of a Neanderthal runs down the chest?
0 Replies
 
iamsam82
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 08:22 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote...
Quote:
Your claim appears to arise from a children's article and I've never heard anybody else make it, therefore I view it as eminently worth ignoring.


Oh. OK. I read Noddy and the Tales of Teddy Ruxpin as a kid. The term foramen magnum never cropped up. Crops up here though, on the Smithsonian site...
Quote:
How do we know Sahelanthropus walked upright?

Some of the oldest evidence of a humanlike species moving about in an upright position comes from Sahelanthropus. The large opening (foramen magnum) where the spinal cord exits out of the cranium from the brain is located further forward (on the underside of the cranium) than in apes or any other primate except humans. This feature indicates that the head of Sahelanthropus was held on an upright body, probably associated with walking on two legs.

http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/human-fossils/species/sahelanthropus-tchadensis

Sahelanthropus, for the record, is more than 6 million years older than neanderthalensis, whose foramen magnum is even further forward. They can tell from Sahelanthropus' foramen magnum that even he walked upright.

Danny's book more highbrow than all of the above, is it?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 08:28 am
How come all those boys have got such tiny peckers?
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 09:11 am
@iamsam82,
I should also mention that the term "upright" is relative, sort of like "big" and "little". Most people would say that Ambam walks upright...
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 09:13 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
How come all those boys have got such tiny peckers?


Good question. Basic reality is that by human standards, primate peckers ARE small. Sort of like demoKKKrats in a way...
0 Replies
 
iamsam82
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 09:24 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote...
Quote:
Most people would say that Ambam walks upright


I think they'd say he didn't as he's a gorilla, and gorillas are primarily quadrupeds. Ambam's skeleton is in no way designed for upright locomotion. Neanderthal's is.

Quote:
Knuckle-walking is a form of quadrupedal walking in which the forelimbs hold the fingers in a partially flexed posture that allows body weight to press down on the ground through the knuckles.

Gorillas and chimpanzees use this style of locomotion as do anteaters and platypuses.

Anthropologists once thought that the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans engaged in knuckle-walking, and humans evolved upright walking from knuckle-walking: a view thought to be supported by reanalysis of overlooked features on hominid fossils.[1][2]

Since then, scientists discovered Ardipithecus ramidus, a human-like hominid descended from the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans. Ar. ramidus engaged in upright walking, but not knuckle-walking. This leads scientists to conclude that chimpanzees evolved knuckle-walking after they split from humans 6 million years ago, and humans evolved upright walking without knuckle-walking.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knuckle-walking)
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  0  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 09:33 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
How come all those boys have got such tiny peckers?

Because Danny and Gunga don't know dick.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 09:41 am
@parados,
Good one . . .
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Aug, 2012 11:50 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

How come all those boys have got such tiny peckers?


Let's be honest. As you might have noticed in the communal showers in the Army, Caucasoidals have peckers that only grow when they are tumescent (aka, aroused and engorged with blood). African-Americans, or those with some African-American ancestry have peckers that appear somewhat tumescent, even in the unaroused, flaccid state. But, when the African-American pecker is aroused, it can then stand at attention, giving a snappy salute, even though it has not grown percentage wise, as much as the caucasoidal pecker grows during arousal. In the end, both peckers seem to achieve a similar maximum length, usually less than 12 inches.

Needless to say, I do notice my surroundings.

Since no one could know anything about Neanderthal peckers, I had to assume you were referencing Homosapien peckers, whether they were caucasoidal, or of African ancestry. As the saying goes, all peckers lead to Rome.

0 Replies
 
 

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