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Where do you Stand on EATING Wild Seafood?

 
 
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 12:55 am
Eat your share before they are gone, or abstain participating in the slaughter of of the all these species on moral grounds?

I vote for a feast....my grandkids will never get any no matter what so I might as well enjoy myself.

What say you?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 12 • Views: 5,662 • Replies: 80

 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 04:55 am

I love fish.





David
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  7  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 06:39 am
@hawkeye10,
whats wrong with conserve or conservation. Seems to be the root words in "conservative".

Weve put a fishing ban on Georges Bank and Gulf of Maine Codfish and they are slowly coming back.
Fihing limits and size limits imposed on lobsters has seemed to work in keeping a seafood resource viable.

Part of the problem is that we not only indicriminantly overfish, we also dump our toxins in the prime seafood areas.

You have a preciously simplistic view on this subject. Why must we totally take a resource to extinction ? We not only remove a resource, we shoot a hole in certain parts of the economy.

The state of MAine imposes limits and sizes and seasons on lobsters, scallops, ground fish anf it bans wild salmon fishing since about 1995. Im fine with that and can afford the prices for the catch that does make it to market.

I am strobgly in favor of strong ;aws punishing poaching and out of season market fishing.

PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 08:07 am
There's such a difference between wild caught salmon and the farm raised.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 11:02 am
@hawkeye10,
I love wild seafood. It is much better than the farm raised crap. When I buy I always ask if it is wild or farm - I don't buy the farm raised kind.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  5  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 11:21 am
@farmerman,
this is simply an extension of his basic moral philosophy.

gimme mine and to hell with the rest of you...
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 11:38 am
@Rockhead,
Rockhead wrote:

this is simply an extension of his basic moral philosophy.

gimme mine and to hell with the rest of you...


As I explained I dont believe that there is any way to save what remains of the seafood for future generations, between over fishing which can not be stopped without a lot of effort and the creation of a global government and pollution caused by the Earth carrying far to many humans the oceans are DOOMED!

I figure I deserve the last of it as much as anyone else.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 12:03 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
The state of MAine imposes limits and sizes and seasons on lobsters, scallops, ground fish anf it bans wild salmon fishing since about 1995. Im fine with that and can afford the prices for the catch that does make it to market.


While I have done very limited research I believe that there is very little historical evidence to suggest that catch limits can work to preserve species, though one recent study claims that they see some signs that it could work

Quote:
Efforts to curb overfishing in five of the world's marine ecosystems are starting to show signs of working.

The news comes from a multi-national study on the status of marine fisheries and ecosystems reported in "Science".

While the report found that stock collapse is an increasing international trend, the scientists involved believe there are positive signs that rebuilding the ocean's depleted fish stocks is possible.

The two year study looked at ten marine ecosystems, evaluating how much marine life was being fished and which management techniques have been used to rebuild depleted stocks. It is a follow-up to a 2006 paper that highlighted a widespread global trend toward fisheries collapse that led to disagreement among the scientific community.



The study found signs of some stock recovery in waters around the U.S., Iceland and New Zealand, supporting the argument that well managed fishing can lead to rebuilding fisheries in other parts of the world.

"These highly managed ecosystems are improving" said Ray Hilborn of the University of Washington and one of the report's lead authors. "Yet there is still a long way to go: of all fish stocks that we examined sixty-three percent remained below target and still needed to be rebuilt."

"Across all regions we are still seeing a troubling trend of increasing stock collapse," said Boris Worm, of Dalhousie University and co-author of the report.

"But this paper shows that our oceans are not a lost cause. The encouraging result is that exploitation rate -- the ultimate driver of depletion and collapse -- is decreasing in half of the ten systems we examined in detail. This means that management in those areas is setting the stage for ecological and economic recovery. It's only a start, but it gives me hope that we have the ability to bring overfishing under control."

Most of the marine ecosystems studied were in intensive managed areas in developed countries where the scientists were able to collect regular data.

However, the report also found that often overfishing would move to areas with weaker laws and enforcement.

http://articles.cnn.com/2009-07-30/tech/conservation.fish_1_fish-stocks-marine-ecosystems-marine-life?_s=PM:TECH
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 12:59 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
You have a preciously simplistic view on this subject.


And all subjects. There was an article in yesterday's Guardian on this very issue. It's not all doom and gloom.

Quote:
The number of fish and seafood products certified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) has shot up by 41% in the UK over the last year, as retailers and supermarkets respond to consumers' demand to know the provenance of the produce they buy.

Fisheries minister Richard Benyon has hailed the progress made over the last 10 years as evidence of "a seismic shift" in people's attitudes towards the quality and source of the fish they eat, but admits that challenges remain in keeping the momentum going.

The MSC is an international non-profit organisation set up to help make the seafood market sustainable. It oversees and manages the distinctive blue labelling system that tells consumers which species of fish they can buy safe in the knowledge they aren't destroying stocks.

The growth in the number of MSC-certified products on UK shelves has been significant, from 200 in 2008 to 988 at the end of 2011. The figure is up 41% from 701 in 2010. More than 13,000 seafood products worldwide – from prepared seafood meals to fresh fish – now bear the MSC label in 80 countries, up 50% over the last year.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/jan/30/sustainable-seafood-products-sharp-rise?INTCMP=SRCH
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 01:04 pm
@izzythepush,
And yet not a single word is said about anything good happening to fish supply.... why is that? The majority of fisheries are stressed to very stressed, and the situation is getting worse dispite a raft a law making over the last decades. I think that labeling and certifiction will amount to nothing more than a way for wealthy nations to feel better about themselves as they nosh on the last of the seafood.
izzythepush
 
  4  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 01:13 pm
@hawkeye10,
Have you read the article or do I need to spell it out? If more people eat fish that is not threatened, then those species that are threatened will be able to recover. Not everyone is a greedy selfish bastard like you.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 01:19 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

Have you read the article or do I need to spell it out? If more people eat fish that is not threatened, then those species that are threatened will be able to recover. Not everyone is a greedy selfish bastard like you.

We don't have enought understanding of how the oceans work to make the honest statement that any kind of fish is not threatened. Ecosystem collapses are true collaspes, see lots of fish, blink and they are gone sometimes......and we never see it coming nor can we explain it after the fact.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  7  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 02:37 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
As I explained I dont believe that there is any way to save what remains of the seafood for future generations,
And your beliefs are based on what?


Quote:
While I have done very limited research I believe that there is very little historical evidence to suggest that catch limits can work to preserve species, though one recent study claims that they see some signs that it could work
Muswt be a reeal inetersting place in your had. You are having an argument with yourelf here.
If most areas impose size and catch limits and impose seasons, fisheries can make a remarkeable recovery.
The moratorium on groundfishing and outlawing drag nets for thios resource has been fairly successful to date. However the cod and hake stocks had been so depleted that it will take several more years before a reasonable sport and commercial fishery can be started.
It will be the end of dirt cheap seafood and maybe thats whats needed.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 02:54 pm
@farmerman,
that reminds me - I think I am going to get some fresh wild fish tonight - my local fish market just opened up again today after their one month annual vacation!

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 03:08 pm
@Linkat,
Ill be over. I dont dislike farm raise salmon if its raised in swift seawaters like the ones in MAine. I dont like the norwegian because its too far from pen to market.
Im actually not nutz about "Wild Salmon" it is too "fishy" for my tastes.
Ive tried pen raised haddock and its kinda limp fleshed but these kinds are used for stuffing with crabmeat anyway.

Most other seafoods are wild that I like. Freshwater fish, I dont like tilapia unless they are very fresh caught farm pond style. They are good broiled only when firm. We get em in markets and they give off a whiff pf ammonia that the fish mongers say they cant smell. BULLLL.
I have been fishing for walleye on several rivers that are open now . Walleye is great as a "crispy fish" dish with a hoysin sauce.
failures art
 
  2  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 03:23 pm
No surprise I'm sure, but I don't eat these fish. I'm more concerned with krill and other euphausiacea as well as phytoplankton on lower trophic levels. Forget the charismatic megafauna.

Farmerman is right, the threat is the toxins we are putting in the ocean. Additionally, the ocean temp is an issue. The seas are big, but it's more of a delicate balance than we often think.

A
R
T
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 03:30 pm
@farmerman,
I like most kinds of fish. tilapia can be good in fish tacos. But I prefer to pay a bit more and go to a reputable fish market - the one I usually go to (and a couple of my secondary ones) are all local family owned. Great because they will let you know what is fresh.

And bonus - I am on his mailing list so one time - they were having an unadvertised special on lobster - you would only know about via the email or if you happened to walk in that day.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 03:37 pm
@Linkat,
are you insinuating that we dont have top notch seafood markets here at the "head of the Chesapeake"?

I dont ever eat lobsters from any market thats not within a drive from Baileys Island and North. I dont even like Port Judy's ;lobster , too close to LI sound which is, IMHO , a sewer
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 03:43 pm
@farmerman,
Nah, not at all - just I love my fish market guy - his prices are a little on the higher side, but I've had a bad fish from him. I think the only seafood I've had better was when we caught our own blue fish and then dug up our own steamers.

We did go to the market to get the lobster as those suckers you can't catch in the winter (at least I don't know anyone who goes scuba diving in the winter).

Best darn seafood meal i've had.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 04:02 pm
@farmerman,
<agreeing with Farmerman all along>
 

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