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Study links childhood IQ to likelihood of future drug use

 
 
CalamityJane
 
  0  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 03:21 pm
@DrewDad,
Quote:
No, they don't, really. That's exactly what I was talking about. Kids get told "don't take drugs" but they don't get told "trying this one time can screw up your entire life."


That's what they're trying to address now with these shocking videos about meth. The emphasis is "I try it just once..." and then you'll see what happened. Again, here is the link to the videos - very powerful message
and it should be shown over and over again...
http://www.methproject.org/ads/tv/
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 03:39 pm
@CalamityJane,
Quote:
these shocking videos about meth. The emphasis is "I try it just once..." and then you'll see what happened. Again, here is the link to the videos - very powerful message



You know the society is not rational about drugs and had a history of knowingly lying about the harm of such things as Marijuana so the anti drug message need to fight again that background even if the warnings are more near the truth then ever before.

Those videos are likely to be view as a modern version of reefer madness.

0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 04:02 pm
@CalamityJane,
I look at some of those videos links and they are very close to the reefer madness government produce 1932 film in fact far too close to that film in style and format.

Not good given that a lot of kids had seen reefer madness as a joke and an example of the government lying.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 04:49 pm

I look upon those drugs as being poison,
but to each his own. Down with the War on Drugs!





David
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 05:55 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
David one of my proudest moments is as a college student, happen while being question for a jury in a marijuana case by a Federal judge.

I told him that I could not serve on the jury because I did not believe in the Marijuana laws nor would I convict anyone under those laws.

Off hand I consider it a fairly brave act to do in a court room as a twenty-one or two years old student.

Footnote this was an intellectual decision alone as it was years later before I gave the drug a try. Found it not to do anything for me other then mess up my time sense and put me to sleep.

Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 06:26 pm
It's funny but I don't recall anyone ever writing:

Quote:
"I have a low IQ and I think IQ testing is grand/bogus?"


I'm not sure that the testing is of any true value. If your intelligence is not, in some way, made evident, what is the difference what your IQ score is? The people who achieve in any field, display the only intelligence that is worth a damn.

I'm not at all surprised by this finding.

Drugs are like anything, but with less of a margin for error. Anything in excess is likely to be a problem. With a lot of drugs excessive use can quickly sneak up on a person.

A high IQ doesn't mean a person is level headed or wise. It doesn't mean that they have been taught to follow the rules religiously either.

Whether or not the finding is accurate, the world has seen a vast array of clearly intelligent and creative drug addicts.


DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 06:31 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
It doesn't take an excess of drugs, though.

One dose of ecstasy. One dose of PCP. One dose of acid. That's all it takes for artificially induced schizophrenia or permanent depression for some people.

Not everyone, of course, but some.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 06:40 pm
Adults need to be role models for their kids and get all the excessive drugs and alcohol out of their own lives if they want any chance of their warnings being viewed with any validity by their kids.

As to the anti-meth ads, one reason they are effective with the teens is some of them are focusing on how the addiction damages a person's looks, something very important to teens. Teens don't feel at all invincible when it comes to their looks.
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 06:42 pm
@DrewDad,
Quote:
One dose of ecstasy. One dose of PCP. One dose of acid. That's all it takes for artificially induced schizophrenia or permanent depression for some people.


I like to see the studies that one dose of anything that is not a massive overdose but perhaps for LSD is that harmful.

Of course how do you prove it that the harm was done at one dose as most people that run into problems had many times more then one dose and pining down where the harm was done would be a hard task indeed.
DrewDad
 
  3  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 06:54 pm
@BillRM,
Like Methamphetamine, "Ecstasy" May Cause Long-Term Brain Damage

Quote:
Heavy users of ecstasy, a synthetic drug that is structurally similar to methamphetamine and the hallucinogen mescaline, may be risking brain damage that remains long after the high has worn off, according to NIDA-supported research.

In a series of studies conducted with rats and nonhuman primates, Dr. George Ricaurte and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions first determined that a single dose of MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), only slightly higher than the size of doses taken by humans, significantly damaged brain cells called neurons that produce serotonin. Serotonin is a major neurotransmitter, or chemical messenger, in the brain that is thought to influence mood, appetite, sleep, and other important functions. Then Dr. Ricaurte reported that 12 to 18 months after the brains of squirrel monkeys had been damaged by MDMA, serotonin-producing nerve fibers had regrown abnormally in some brain regions and failed to regrow at all in others.

Unlike methamphetamine, which damages brain neurons that produce both serotonin and another important chemical messenger called dopamine, "MDMA selectively damages serotonin neurons in virtually all species examined to date," Dr. Ricaurte says.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 06:58 pm
@Butrflynet,
Butrflynet wrote:
Adults need to be role models for their kids
Did anyone have a "role model" ?
I had guys whom I admired, George Washington, MacArthur n Herbert Philbrick, but I never considered copying them.

Has anyone had a role model ?





David
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 07:55 pm
@DrewDad,
Comment only slightly greater doses taken by humans now why if your concern is human reactions would it be greater and if the dose larger then a normal human dose is given to an animal that weight a fraction of the average adult human there is still a far far far greater problem with relating it to humans.Something does not smell right here at least with the information given.

Footnote I am not saying that the drug is harmless in one dose or many doses but that study does not smell right on it face.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 07:56 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:
David one of my proudest moments is as a college student,
happen while being question for a jury in a marijuana case by a Federal judge.

I told him that I could not serve on the jury because I did not believe in the Marijuana
laws nor would I convict anyone under those laws.

Off hand I consider it a fairly brave act to do in a court room as a twenty-one or two years old student.

Footnote this was an intellectual decision alone as it was years later
before I gave the drug a try. Found it not to do anything for me other
then mess up my time sense and put me to sleep.
Yes, u were very honest, Bill.
Another alternative from which u coud have chosen
was to serve and vote your conscience; "jury nullification".

U remind me of my own youthful hi jinx with federal judges.

As a new lawyer, I applied for admission to the Bar
of the US District Court for the Southern Dist. of NY.

The instructions to applicants were very emphatic (big, BOLD capital letters)
that we needed to have SPONSORs (prior members of that Bar)
to move the Court for an order of our admission to that Bar.
I got one, but on the day of swearing in, my sponsor was beginning
his first day in a new job, and he attended to his business,
not to my requests.

When I arrived in Court, I saw the calendar posted outside
the federal judge's courtroom. There were c.30 names on it
for admission to that Bar, that day.

About a quarter of the way thru the calendar call,
after many speeches endorsing admission n moving for
admission by the sponsors, a candidate answered,
requesting an adjournment, because his sponsor was absent: Granted.
He gave him a date.

After several more candidates were successfully moven for admission,
it happened again: a candidate moved for an adjournment
on the same grounds: Granted again.
He gave him a date.


When my turn arrived, I explained to the judge
that my sponsor coud not make it because he
was on his first day of a new job, and I said:
"I move for admission to the Bar of this Court" and I argued in support of that motion.

Judicial silence for about 45 seconds . . .
then the judge asked something like: "Is Joe Blow here ?" No Blow.
"Is John Smith here ? " No Smith. (The 2 earlier adjournments)

Then the Judge said: "The motion is GRANTED."
I was admitted to the Bar of that Court without adjournment n without any sponsor.

I got a kick out of that.

That nite, our firm's biggest client
threw a big party, for unrelated reasons.
Thay knew of my sponsorless plight n were interested in how well
I 'd made out in Court and were amused at my success in getting admitted with no sponsor.





David
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 07:59 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Parents don't have to be role models, but they set an example for kids. If the parents smoke and drink a lot of alcohol, the kids will do the same.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 08:04 pm
@DrewDad,
God I love it when I am right that there is something badly wrong with that study.


http://www.maps.org/mdma/studyresponse.html

George Ricaurte retracts his paper published in Science claiming that Ecstasy causes severe dopaminergic depletion and can lead to Parkinson's disease.

For a paper critiquing the methodology and conclusions of some of Dr. Ricaurte's other papers, read "Deconstructing Ecstasy" by Dr. Charles Grob.



0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 08:07 pm
@CalamityJane,
CalamityJane wrote:
Parents don't have to be role models, but they set an example for kids.
If the parents smoke and drink a lot of alcohol, the kids will do the same.
That coud be. I made a particular point of not
smoking, because my father did. He was stinking me out.





David
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 08:14 pm
@CalamityJane,
Quote:
If the parents smoke and drink a lot of alcohol, the kids will do the same


I had known adults who never taken a drink in their life because they did not wish to take the risk of following in the foot steps of a parent who abuse alcohol so your statement is hardly correct on it face.

The same for smoking parents as like everything else it depend on many factors and no such statement of your that cover all kids is going to be true.

My grandmother used to need to take a flat bed wagon, the kind with horses, to picked up her father my great grandfather from the bars after he had gotten drunk and you better not drink in front of her.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 09:27 am
@ehBeth,
Interesting links, ehBeth. Thanks.

This really struck me:

Quote:
Children with written expression difficulties can find essential activities at school, such as note taking, to be insurmountable tasks. Note taking requires listening, comprehending, retaining information while continuing to process new information, and summarizing the important points into a useful format. The physical acts involved in writing notes must occur simultaneously with these cognitive processes. All of this must be accomplished with sufficient speed, automaticity, and with a quality of production leading to writing legibly enough for the notes to be useful later.


His teacher talked about how when she's demonstrating something by writing it on the board, expecting the kids to take notes that Mo never does. He just stares at his desk. She says she can tell that he's listening, really listening, and concentrating on what is being said but that he will never write anything down.

However, the rest of the article is not really relevant to Mo. He has good handwriting, great coordination, excellent language skills (phonological awareness (sounding out nonsense words) was his highest score on the Woodcock-Johnson test, placing him in the 63rd percentile).

It's a puzzle!

As to the second article I'll confess to being tempted to put him in that category but if I'm honest about it I'd be hard pressed to put him into any a gifted category where it comes to any academics. Most of his scores fall into the "average" range, some being high average, some being low average, showing his work to be consistent with his grade level.

I do think he's found some ways to compensate for his weak areas and I do think that those compensations are emotionally draining for him.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 09:39 am
@Butrflynet,
He's not a very good typist but he's learning. I don't really think it's the method of getting the ideas on paper but the organization of the thoughts that gets things so jumbled.

For instance: his class has been taking a series of field trips to a science center. He comes home from each of these trips so excited and spilling over with stories of what they did, what experiments they preformed, who they worked with etc.

After each trip they are supposed to write in a diary about their experience. His teacher recently showed me his diary, it read like this: We went to ______ station, then we did _____________, then we had lunch, then we ____________, then we came back to school.

I think that if he typed it it would say exactly the same thing.
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 10:18 am
@BillRM,
Yeah. The downwind-fast-than-the-wind was also absurd on the face of it, and made you look like such a genius.

Oh. Wait. No, you turned out to be completely wrong, didn't you?

lulz
 

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