11
   

Study links childhood IQ to likelihood of future drug use

 
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 09:03 am
@boomerang,
I also think that the poor kids are also not given real life skills either.
Most low income families I know are TOO busy working whether its working for someone else ( yard work, day labor etc) or just working a small job like crazy ( mcdonalds for example) they do not have time to even be with their kids so the kids are essentially floating on their own when it comes to finding their place and learning what to do with them selves.

I wonder if this study , though I am not throwing it to the wind as useless...but I wonder if this study is sort of skewed to making the drug user image more universal instead of always driving home the image of the gang member and such.
dlowan
 
  3  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 09:24 am
@boomerang,
That's a massive processing speed issue for him.

were they specific re whether this was auditory, written, what?

That would be very stressful for him.

http://yourcatcareguide.com/wordpress/?p=145

That little paper includes slow processing speed material...not sure how helpful it is.

There's a fair bit on the web re processing speed.....hmmmm, I recently got a book for kids on learning issues.

http://www.amazon.com/Keeping-Head-School-Abilities-Disorders/dp/0838820697/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_b



There's a few by that guy......I actually got All Kinds of Minds, but I can't swear it has processing speed in it.

I'd have a look at No More Meltdowns on Amazon too....Ive just started it.

Mo's hypersensitivity to rejection and misreading of social cues about it is obviously common in kids with his history. Is he getting to the point where you can start addressing this cognitively with him?

That discrepancy in his abilities profile is a real bummer...no wonder he finds school hard.

dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 09:28 am
@dlowan,
Can't ignore Dan Hughes!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553807919/ref=oh_o03_s00_i00_details
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 09:36 am
@shewolfnm,
Thanks for providing a classic example of a smart, under-challenged child running into difficulties in the school system.

Smart kids often seem to be ignored at the cost of providing services to everyone else. The dangers of a bored kid are no less because someone is academically gifted.
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 09:53 am
@dlowan,
Thanks for all the links! I think I'm having a hard time finding appropriate information because I don't know the right terms to google.

Yeah, it is a massive issue. His frustration is immense and intense. The problems are all with written information. Having to write things down seems almost physically painful to him: he can tell you, in detail and in depth, what he wants to write but when it comes to writing it down.... he just can't do it. Something stops it. His vocabulary is great, he's a whiz at spelling, his reading comprehension, according to his teacher, "is among the best of the kids in his grade" but if you look at his writing you'd swear he was at least a couple of grades behind.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 09:54 am
@dlowan,
I think your first link might be a goof.....
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 10:08 am
@boomerang,
I know, at Mo's grade level they still have to submit handwritten papers, but - after talking to the teacher - would it be possible for Mo to bring in typed homework?
We have in the office these Dragon voice recognition devices that type what you speak and they're fantastic and even pick up certain accents (helloooo).
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 10:23 am
@ehBeth,
Quote:

Smart kids often seem to be ignored at the cost of providing services to everyone else.


Not in America. You don't need to look much further than the charter school explosion with their selective admissions to see that a great deal of money is going towards not ignoring the smart kids at the cost of everyone else.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 10:27 am
@CalamityJane,
They won't even let him use a calculator at this point but we're working on getting some concessions. But then you have to weigh the social aspect of such things -- getting slightly different homework than the other kids caused 10 tons of bullshit for him when the "smart" kids caught on and were unmerciful in their "teasing".

I'm going to look into that Dragon thing!
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 11:01 am
@boomerang,
Yes....iPads can be odd that way. I'll get it later on a proper computer.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 11:41 am
@boomerang,
So it's the transition from the answer he can verbalize to the written that's the sticking point?

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1835883-overview

(lots of resources as you page through this)

Is it possible Mo falls into the "twice exceptional" group?

http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/What_is_Gifted/2echildren.htm

The person I've mentioned to you on another thread ran into problems as she fits into this group. Off-the charts at the top end of spatial skills and spoken language, below the 10th percentile in expressive writing. She's got an extra whammy as she is pretty much unable to keyboard because of injuries to her hands.

BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 12:54 pm
Gifted program kids in my high school were mainly females and mainly assholes.

My tested IQ always had tested out at the 128 level even if I can not put a sentence together and my abilities and interests had always focus tightly on mathematic and sciences and therefore I found myself sharing those subjects areas classrooms with the label gifted kids and for the most part outshining them in those areas.

Only in college did I first meet people with more abilities in those fields as a matter of fact.

In any case, I was never either fish or fowl and the high school had a hard time adjusting to a B student with many short comings being able to outshine the their mainly female officially gifted students in some subjects areas.

One guidance counsel even told my father that I was not as bright as I thought I happen to be as I was just an overachiever. LOL

Given the personalities of the label gifted young ladies I needed to deal with I am not too surprise they would be more likely to be drug users then most of the population.

They felt it was totally unfair that a non-member of their group would or could mess up their class standings especially in classes that had grading on a curve.

They was mainly interested in grades and class standings and I was mainly interested in the subjects being taught.

High School was fun to say the least.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 12:59 pm
@boomerang,
Dragon voice recognition isn't cheap, but the best out there.
I do hope you'll find a school that is much more nurturing towards Mo's needs. Public school is just not the answer for him. The emotional pain he's
getting from his peers there is so unnecessary. I know how unmerciful
kids can be, it's even shocking at times, isn't it?


0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 01:13 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:

Thanks for all the links! I think I'm having a hard time finding appropriate information because I don't know the right terms to google.

Yeah, it is a massive issue. His frustration is immense and intense. The problems are all with written information. Having to write things down seems almost physically painful to him: he can tell you, in detail and in depth, what he wants to write but when it comes to writing it down.... he just can't do it. Something stops it. His vocabulary is great, he's a whiz at spelling, his reading comprehension, according to his teacher, "is among the best of the kids in his grade" but if you look at his writing you'd swear he was at least a couple of grades behind.


I'd be curious to know if this is true only for when he is having to use his handwriting (pen and paper) to make notes, or if it improves with his using a keyboard. I think they would use different parts of the brain and may have different results.

Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 01:26 pm
@boomerang,
Here are some old threads about Dragon Naturally Speaking:

http://able2know.org/topic/126720-1

http://able2know.org/topic/161679-1
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 01:35 pm
@shewolfnm,
Shewolfnm one sixty that is four SDs above the norm and you ended up doing drugs?

The few times with an IQ only 2 SD above the norm I had used illegal drugs it was to get lay as that what the young lady wish us to do together and no young male is bright when the blood leave the big head for the little head.

Strange as I had zero wish to get high and fought the effects of the drugs on my body to the best of my abilities.

I hate even taking pain pills and always ended up with an almost full bottle when my doctor insist I had them available after a medical procedure.

The last time I told the doctor that I already had enough pain pills to supply Rush Limbaugh for a month at home.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 02:10 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:
Shewolfnm one sixty that is four SDs above the norm and you ended up doing drugs?

The few times with an IQ only 2 SD above the norm I had used illegal drugs it was to get lay as that what the young lady wish us to do together and no young male is bright when the blood leave the big head for the little head.

Strange as I had zero wish to get high and fought the effects of the drugs on my body to the best of my abilities.

I hate even taking pain pills and always ended up with an almost full bottle when my doctor insist I had them available after a medical procedure.

The last time I told the doctor that I already had enough pain pills to supply Rush Limbaugh for a month at home.
That happened to me too, after my surgery in 2005. I got the Rx for pain pills filled,
but I never had any pain, so I ended up with a lot of unused pain pills.

I used them on odd occasions, e.g. when I fell hard and bled.

I think that thay have a half life on the shelf, tho.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 02:29 pm
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:

boomerang wrote:

I think kids just feel invincible. I know I did.

I suppose it's self medication.



When I was in school, I have a very high IQ. I still do .
And I was never EVER interested in ANYTHING that had to do with school. It was boring. It was common, dumbed down things like read, copy answer, and recite.
Reading tests made me frustrated. They would give this 3 or 4 paragraph story, then ask you questions about it. These questions went in order of the paragraph 90% of the time and could be answered by simply matching the first few words of the question to the almost EXACT sentence in the story. This was not 'learning' ... and I knew it.

I figured out that teaching pattern in 3rd grade and my then teacher Mr Faulkner picked me out and started handing me books from higher grades. Those books taught in the exact same fashion and I went through those easily. With no real comprehension of the information needed... ANYONE could pass those tests with just a little scanning of the stories. They still do that today.

He declared me gifted and had me moved. I thought that was the dumbest thing ever.

4th, 5th..etc.. Same thing.

In high school ( mind you I was only there until 10th grade) I was put in the special ed class. I had by passed the gifted rooms and at this point in my education I was not doing ANY home work, or ANY class work. I did however take all tests. With just that alone I was pulling in c's and d's. Just enough to pass... just enough to show I knew the material ...but not enough to make me have to pay attention if that makes sense.

Invincible.. yeah. I agree with Boom. I thought that as well. Especially when I was tested for my IQ several times and all times hit 160 or better. This enforced my very arrogant idea that I did not need to study. Though to a certain extent I was correct.. but in the big scheme of things I was wrongly full of myself. Hence the invincibility ..

Frankly, I think the IQ test is only a way to show how well you can solve problems, not necessarily a major judge memory or retention of specific pieces of knowledge.Though you DO have to understand things like basic sentence structure ,language rules, algebra, trig..etc to get through it . Once you have done well with that part of the test they have to move you on to the shapes and blocks test. Again.. no real retention necessary.

Long rambling short.. I was bored out of my mind as a kid. I thought school and the basic education was stupid. I was shocked that people struggled with such simple concepts and I stayed far away from most kids...gravitating to the stoners. There, we stayed high and skipped school to do things we actually enjoyed.

I left school at 14. And its no secret that I have done a lot of drugs. I never felt alienated or different from other kids. I always thought THEY were the ones who were different and why were they not getting basic stuff. I had nothing in common with them and didnt enjoy their company . I still feel that way in life, but as an adult I can pick and choose the people I associate with now instead of being jammed into a classroom full of people I would never speak with anyway.

but my question to this whole article is this-

Why are only the 'smart' students being called out on taking drugs because they 'are different' ?
What about the students in gangs?
Your chess club type kids? The ones no one would hang out with?
What about the students who have been failed?
The very fat ones?
Super skinny ones?
Poor kids?
Even rich kids? People call them arrogant, stuck up..etc.etc.

My point is that there are always people , groups and personalities that are singled out and teased. MOST KIDS at one point feel they do not belong, and are not fitting in some where.
If that were the only thing necessary for taking to drugs then you could not simply point to the IQ and call it a major factor...
I agree with that lack of desire for their company; no interest in it.
I never attended school social events, including the graduation ceremonies
(except law school).

It always struck me as odd when I read of kids:
"desperately wanting to 'fit in' and to be accepted by their peer group".
I never had much interest in what thay thawt about anything (except real world politics).





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 02:38 pm
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:
I also think that the poor kids are also not given real life skills either.

Most low income families I know are TOO busy working whether its working for someone else ( yard work, day labor etc) or just working a small job like crazy ( mcdonalds for example) they do not have time to even be with their kids so the kids are essentially floating on their own when it comes to finding their place and learning what to do with them selves.
That 's not limited to low income families.
My parents were very busy, for years, attending to our family businesses,
such that thay got home quite late each nite.

I was alone from age 8, until c.9PM or 10PM, Saturdays and summers.
That was not bad. I had a lot of freedom
(not to imply that when thay got home, I was less than free).





David
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 03:06 pm
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:
if that worked? we would not have the percentages of drug users we have today. Everyone knows drugs harm you.

No, they don't, really. That's exactly what I was talking about. Kids get told "don't take drugs" but they don't get told "trying this one time can screw up your entire life."

shewolfnm wrote:
I do know ( even from experience) that people who choose to go the drug route are essentially self medicating due to something being wrong.. But how could a society pin point that wrong in every single person and attempt to fix it is absolutely beyond me and probably near impossible..

That's very true. Our culture attaches a stigma to mental illness that prevents many people from seeking help.
 

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